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Topic: Four Part Texture and Orchestration

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  1. #1

    Four Part Texture and Orchestration

    First let me say that I accept the wisdom of learning traditional harmony and voice leading and I further accept the wisdom of avoiding forbidden parallels and other rules. But I can't make the connection between traditional harmony and voice leading and composing for orchestra, even a virtual orchestra. The textures seem different. I am not sure if I should be thinking in small choirs of 4 part harmony or if it is something entirely different. I hope this makes some sense.

  2. #2

    Re: Four Part Texture and Orchestration

    Richard,

    For the last 10 years I have been teaching orchestration to GPO users and others, using Sibelius as a means of transmitting scores by email. I charge no fee; my reward is the progress of my pupils. You may wish to enrol with me, but I will insist that first you show me some command of the rules of harmony that you revere. Email me at td@quorndon.com for more details.

    (The short answer to your basic query is doubling. Four-part harmony can be retained, but with more than one instrument to a part. This can be done well or badly - that's part of the art of orchestration.)

    Terry Dwyer MA BMus LRAM (and Garritan Professor)
    Retired music lecturer, conductor, composer, author.

  3. #3

    Re: Four Part Texture and Orchestration

    Quote Originally Posted by Poolman View Post
    Richard,

    For the last 10 years I have been teaching orchestration to GPO users and others, using Sibelius as a means of transmitting scores by email. I charge no fee; my reward is the progress of my pupils. You may wish to enrol with me, but I will insist that first you show me some command of the rules of harmony that you revere. Email me at td@quorndon.com for more details.

    (The short answer to your basic query is doubling. Four-part harmony can be retained, but with more than one instrument to a part. This can be done well or badly - that's part of the art of orchestration.)

    Terry Dwyer MA BMus LRAM (and Garritan Professor)
    Retired music lecturer, conductor, composer, author.
    I'm interested in orchestration but I don't use Sibelius; would that be a problem?

  4. #4

    Re: Four Part Texture and Orchestration

    Quote Originally Posted by SecondSelf View Post
    I'm interested in orchestration but I don't use Sibelius; would that be a problem?
    Yes. And I would need proof of compositional skills.

  5. #5

    Re: Four Part Texture and Orchestration

    As one who, I feel safe in saying, is probably not up to Terry Dwyer's standards, I have to add that I have always enjoyed the tutorials for orchestration that he has posted on line. I found his pieces on the French Horn and scoring for woodwinds especially helpfull. I hope he will continue to write such tutorials, so that those of us who would probably not be able to keep up with him in one-on-one lessons could benefit from his experience and advice.

    Speaking for myself, I would most like more information about how to effectively orchestrate accompaniment for vocalists in a live setting (i.e. solos, small ensembles, and choruses in musicals). I'd also like to learn more techniques for making small orchestras sound big. I think these are the two most important issues for the musical theater today. Unfortunately, there has been precious little written about them. If Mr. Dwyer or other forum members have experience in these areas, I hope they will share them wth us.

    Allegro Data Solutions

  6. #6

    Re: Four Part Texture and Orchestration

    I too have enjoyed the tutorials. I am currently making my way through Structure Your Music and have read the tutorial on Scoring for Woodwind, which is what I find the most challenging.

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