• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Topic: relation between sample bit depth and processor load

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    relation between sample bit depth and processor load

    Here\'s a technical one: if you have your audio hardware set to use 24 bit drivers, and you\'re using virtual samplers that are drawing from 16-bit multisamples (obviously not the new and venerable Bosendorfer 290), are you asking your processor to do conversions on the fly?

    More generally, would the tax on the processor be lower if you were to set your audio hardware at 16 bit when using virtual instruments with 16 bit samples?

  2. #2

    Re: relation between sample bit depth and processor load

    Originally posted by nathanmj:
    Here\'s a technical one: if you have your audio hardware set to use 24 bit drivers, and you\'re using virtual samplers that are drawing from 16-bit multisamples (obviously not the new and venerable Bosendorfer 290), are you asking your processor to do conversions on the fly?

    More generally, would the tax on the processor be lower if you were to set your audio hardware at 16 bit when using virtual instruments with 16 bit samples?
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Hmm, I have used 16-bit samples with my audio hardware set to both 16 and 24 bits. I can\'t say that I have noticed any difference in performance.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    5,755

    Re: relation between sample bit depth and processor load

    Hi Nathan,

    No additional load. Either way, the data is being funneled down from 32-bit float in most audio engines. There probably hasn\'t been a true 16-bit app on the market in 7-8 years.

  4. #4

    Re: relation between sample bit depth and processor load

    Thanks Bruce.

  5. #5

    Re: relation between sample bit depth and processor load

    Bruce is right. Most everything uses floats these days.

    I\'ve recently been working on some Sonic Foun... Sony plug-in programming. To be backwards compatible you program both 16-bit and 32-bit float solutions. Sound Forge figures out which path to send the data through.

    The float stuff is actually more efficient, since you don\'t have to do limiting to prevent roll-over. (Things that go past full-scale roll over to zero if you\'re not careful. POP!) Even less efficient is if the plug-in doesn\'t provide both options, and the host program has to convert back and forth between the two.

    There is one situation where 16-bit is more efficient than 24-bit, and that\'s with samplers that stream from disk. The 24-bit samples have 50% more data, and you need them NOW.

    Note that the sample rate thing isn\'t free the way that bit depth is. 96 kHz takes twice as much power as 48 kHz.

    I hope this post is clear. If not, ask more and I\'ll type more confusing stuff.

  6. #6

    Re: relation between sample bit depth and processor load

    Sorry, I don\'t mean to hijack this thread (I guess I just have!) but John when you said;

    The float stuff is actually more efficient, since you don\'t have to do limiting to prevent roll-over. (Things that go past full-scale roll over to zero if you\'re not careful. POP!)
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">I have noticed that some of my tracks (audio wav files) are popping when they never have before. They are 24bit captured from Giga and when brought into SX 2, Cubase converts them to 32 bit. When a part of the track has no noise, for example a flute note stopping, there is a loud pop.

    Does this have something to do with the bit dpeth conversion in some way? I have never come across this problem before.

    Sorry Nathan. [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  7. #7

    Re: relation between sample bit depth and processor load

    I can\'t guess where your POP would come from. Maybe a bad conversion. It\'s hard to say. I\'d bet it\'s obnoxious though! I hope you find a way to avoid it in the future.

Go Back to forum

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •