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Topic: Fanfare for Performance Seminar for trumpets (I'm not quite sure about it...)

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  1. #1

    Fanfare for Performance Seminar for trumpets (I'm not quite sure about it...)

    This is one of those pieces that I am not sure if I like it or not so "I need a little help from my friends." Performance seminar was a class that all music majors had to go to every Friday afternoon at 1:00 pm to hear our peers perform. This work was featured in one of those Fridays long ago. I will tell more about this fanfare a little later, but please tell me what you honestly think about it because I honestly do not know. The sounds I used were SAM Trumpet Section and Garritan Trumpet Overlay AG.
    ~Rod
    MP3 with Trumpet Choir https://www.box.com/s/65gr2ohj73rq0kx24ywg
    Score https://www.box.com/s/9y1x69lj8s4jl0kf693c
    Randy's MP3 with soloists! https://www.box.com/s/ha4n13m9nffmlny08fw4
    LIVE version, just 1 take so don't judge too harshly, https://www.box.com/s/z24c2za2d840eobt7xfq

  2. #2

    Re: Fanfare for Performance Seminar for trumpets (I'm not quite sure about it...)

    It's short but sweet, Rod - Nice moderne opening chords, some traditional fanfareish development - and then, boom, she's done. What's not to like? - Well, if you're talking about the recording as opposed to the writing, there's a particular ringing sound to the SAM Trumpets that always bothers me a bit. I think to layer in the more tame original GPO trumpets may be worth a try, and maybe the more tame overlays too. Were you asking more about the composition, or the recording? I'm not sure.-- But there are my thoughts on both.

    Randy

  3. #3

    Re: Fanfare for Performance Seminar for trumpets (I'm not quite sure about it...)

    Quote Originally Posted by rbowser- View Post
    It's short but sweet, Rod - Nice moderne opening chords, some traditional fanfareish development - and then, boom, she's done. What's not to like? - Well, if you're talking about the recording as opposed to the writing, there's a particular ringing sound to the SAM Trumpets that always bothers me a bit. I think to layer in the more tame original GPO trumpets may be worth a try, and maybe the more tame overlays too. Were you asking more about the composition, or the recording? I'm not sure.-- But there are my thoughts on both.

    Randy
    I was worried mostly about composition, but thank you with your advice on the recording also. Having heard this piece perform several times over the years, it is actual funny and refreshing to hear a sampled rendition of the work. Randy, since it’s normally played with only three trumpet players and not an entire section your comments concerning using the Garritan trumpets would be a more accurate interpretation of the fanfare so I may try it later in the day. Also just wondering, do you think it needs more or less reverb? I am just curious on your thoughts.
    ~Rod

  4. #4

    Re: Fanfare for Performance Seminar for trumpets (I'm not quite sure about it...)

    Yes, I see now from the score it was written for 3 trumpets, and not sections as you have it in the recording.

    In theory, using solo instruments could make for a more accurate recording, but maybe you were worried about the solo trumpets not holding up well enough in the spotlight? Well, especially since this is so brief, it wouldn't take long to do an experimental recording. One possible improvement would be the building of sound as you've written it, rather than the constant ensemble sound you have from note one in this recording.

    Using just GPO, since I don't think you have JABB, you have 3 trumpet solos available - SAM solo, and Trumpets 1 and 2 solos. The other soloists are Piccolo trumpets.

    It would be worth experimenting with the regular Overlay instead of the AG(gressive) Overlay you've used. BUT, remember the Overlays aren't meant to be used at one constant volume as you seem to have them here. We talked about the use of Overlays on this thread:

    Tip Of The Week: Brass Overlays in GPO


    The only problem with what's outlined in that Overlays tutorial is that full MIDI control is more difficult, some of it seems to be impossible, in Finale and other notation programs. I played the Overlays volume performance in that demo. But if you can bring at least some control over the overlays layer like that, it would help.

    And yes, I think it would be worth trying this with the reverb turned down some. Easy enough to test while trying out the other suggestions.

    This fanfare is just 25 seconds long - It wouldn't take me long to run a test in Sonar if you'd like me to, Rodney. You could just send me the MIDI file, and I could try out various trumpets in GPO, JABB and CoMB. Let me know!

    Randy

  5. #5

    Re: Fanfare for Performance Seminar for trumpets (I'm not quite sure about it...)

    Quote Originally Posted by rbowser- View Post
    Yes, I see now from the score it was written for 3 trumpets, and not sections as you have it in the recording.

    In theory, using solo instruments could make for a more accurate recording, but maybe you were worried about the solo trumpets not holding up well enough in the spotlight? Well, especially since this is so brief, it wouldn't take long to do an experimental recording. One possible improvement would be the building of sound as you've written it, rather than the constant ensemble sound you have from note one in this recording.

    Using just GPO, since I don't think you have JABB, you have 3 trumpet solos available - SAM solo, and Trumpets 1 and 2 solos. The other soloists are Piccolo trumpets.

    It would be worth experimenting with the regular Overlay instead of the AG(gressive) Overlay you've used. BUT, remember the Overlays aren't meant to be used at one constant volume as you seem to have them here. We talked about the use of Overlays on this thread:

    Tip Of The Week: Brass Overlays in GPO


    The only problem with what's outlined in that Overlays tutorial is that full MIDI control is more difficult, some of it seems to be impossible, in Finale and other notation programs. I played the Overlays volume performance in that demo. But if you can bring at least some control over the overlays layer like that, it would help.

    And yes, I think it would be worth trying this with the reverb turned down some. Easy enough to test while trying out the other suggestions.

    This fanfare is just 25 seconds long - It wouldn't take me long to run a test in Sonar if you'd like me to, Rodney. You could just send me the MIDI file, and I could try out various trumpets in GPO, JABB and CoMB. Let me know!

    Randy
    Thank you for the reply Randy. That would be absolutely wonderful of you. It will have to wait until this afternoon though for me to send you the midi file since it is at home, but I would love to hear what you do with it. Thank you for the link. It is one of my Randy fav's!
    ~Rodney

  6. #6

    Re: Fanfare for Performance Seminar for trumpets (I'm not quite sure about it...)

    Quote Originally Posted by composingatnight View Post
    Thank you for the reply Randy. That would be absolutely wonderful of you. It will have to wait until this afternoon though for me to send you the midi file since it is at home, but I would love to hear what you do with it. Thank you for the link. It is one of my Randy fav's!
    ~Rodney
    That's fine, Rod - You've sent email to me before, so you have the addy - Actually it's also available in this message by clicking my name. Let's see if I can run an experiment that's helpful. Later, then!

    Randy

  7. #7

    Re: Fanfare for Performance Seminar for trumpets (I'm not quite sure about it...)

    In my opinion, you succeeded pretty well in realizing an opening fanfare. It makes me think of the Theban trumpets. A surprising and thrilling opening chord develops to a rich trumpet trio. I prefer not to interfere with the discussion on the recording quality or the use of layers and reverb. That isn't really my cup of tea.

    Well done!


    Max

  8. #8

    Re: Fanfare for Performance Seminar for trumpets (I'm not quite sure about it...)

    Quote Originally Posted by Max Hamburg View Post
    In my opinion, you succeeded pretty well in realizing an opening fanfare. It makes me think of the Theban trumpets. A surprising and thrilling opening chord develops to a rich trumpet trio. I prefer not to interfere with the discussion on the recording quality or the use of layers and reverb. That isn't really my cup of tea.

    Well done!


    Max
    Thank you so much for responding Max; it means a lot. Recording quality isn't my forte either, but that's why we have "The Man" Randy! What is Theban trumpets? Just wondering.
    ~Rod

  9. #9

    Re: Fanfare for Performance Seminar for trumpets (I'm not quite sure about it...)

    Ladies (are there any ladies on the forum?) and Gentlemen (have you ever notice the word gentle in gentlemen?) I proudly present to you the wonderful and talented Mr. Randy B. for his recording of the fanfare! It sounds as though there are 3 trumpet soloists instead of the ensemble sound. Thank you Randy for taking the time to record this in Sonar, for rolling up your sleeves, and performing your magic. It sounds thrilling, and more like the original live performance.
    https://www.box.com/s/ha4n13m9nffmlny08fw4
    ~Rod

  10. #10

    Re: Fanfare for Performance Seminar for trumpets (I'm not quite sure about it...)

    So now I’m going to tell you the story of “Fanfare for Performance Seminar.” In college I went through a compositional rebellious state. My theory professors hated it but my instrumentalist professors absolutely loved it. For example, in college I was taught to follow rules and avoid parallel 5th’s and 8va’s so to retaliate I wrote what you all know as “Fanfare for Earth” which every beat features a glorious parallel 5th or 8va creating a theorist's worst nightmare that refuses to use a 3rd until the final chord. Back then the work was only called “Fanfare” and only about 30 measures but still got its point across and a slap in the face toward the rules of traditional harmony.

    “Fanfare for Performance Seminar” has a similar story but deals with the concept of twelve-tone set theory. My private composition professor gave me an assignment where he wanted a piece for twelve-tone. I said sure, but I wasn’t going to sacrifice sound for theory. I would write the piece, but my goal was to come up with the most singable tone-row this world has ever heard. The fanfare uses all 12 pitches but even the first 5 notes outline a m9 and the work ends in a blasphemy major chord. That’s very scandalous! He hated it, the brass and piano faculty loved it, but that was my point.

    After listening to a couple of my friends’ performance of Stravinsky’s twelve-tone fanfare for two trumpets called “Fanfare for a New Theatre,” I decided to compose my own twelve-tone fanfare using three trumpets. My best friend in the whole land Dan, our buddy Jack, and I practice the fanfare late one night in the concert hall of the music building. We said to ourselves wouldn’t it be cool to play this piece on performance seminar, but we are going to do it a little differently than other performances. Other performances are very professional, come out, acknowledge the audience, etc. We were not going to do that. Instead, we were going to come out, blow them away for 30 seconds, and just leave without any acknowledgement whatsoever.

    So we came out, the audience applauded, we played, blew them away, and then left the stage. The audience of our peers went nuts and stood up with applause and excitement. We then took our curtain call and graciously thanked them. This hardly ever happens at performance seminar. It’s the last class on a Friday before the weekend starts, and you are performing in front of your music major peers who are secretly judging your every move. Our peers loved the work understanding the music's meaning, “I will not ever sacrifice emotion for theory.”

    Now the little fanfare has been performed by different people in different venues under different names. This work has been called, “Fanfare for a Student Recital,” “Fanfare for a Church Service,” “Fanfare for a Brass Revue,” and even “Fanfare for Beth who Took the Last Dr. Pepper and We Will Never Forgive her!!!!”

    There's more to the story of this fanfare, but I am a little afraid to tell it on a public forum since it involves Stravinsky's own trumpet player who visited the school of music and heard it performed.
    ~Rod

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