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Topic: Jim Corrigan's Nashville Guitars..

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  1. #1

    Jim Corrigan\'s Nashville Guitars..

    ..just received it in the mail.
    Anyone have any suggestions, tip/tricks to get the most out of this library?

    Thanks,

    DanS

  2. #2

    Re: Jim Corrigan\'s Nashville Guitars..

    Well I already have Matt Ragan\'s library, and I do the key switches the same way as you guys. Sounds bloody awful before you set them correctly. I agree, changing a split second before works best.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: Jim Corrigan\'s Nashville Guitars..

    Listen to \"Lying Eyes\" by The Eagles. That\'s a classic use of the high strung guitar technique. Essentially, it\'s a way to get a strong sense of chord progression into a mix in a very transparent way, leaving the middle wide open for leads.

  4. #4

    Re: Jim Corrigan\'s Nashville Guitars..

    Thanks Bruce. I\'ve always suggested to my guitarists to set their acoustics this way when we record strummed guitar parts, but they never wanted to. Well, now they don\'t have to!

    Cheers.

    D

  5. #5

    Re: Jim Corrigan\'s Nashville Guitars..

    Originally posted by DanS:
    ..just received it in the mail.
    Anyone have any suggestions, tip/tricks to get the most out of this library?

    Thanks,

    DanS
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">It sounds great in a mix...one of the best strummed guitars around. But the chord list is way too short.

    The Martin sample is sweet and lends itself well to finger picking styles played on a keyboard.

  6. #6

    Re: Jim Corrigan\'s Nashville Guitars..

    One other thing...I usually record the first take without the keyswitches and go back and overbub the chord progressions with the keyswitch. Needless to say, the first pass sounds like hell with all major chords, but I find it too difficult to keep the strumming going on the right hand and changing the progression on the left. The chord changes work better if you hit them a split second prior to the beat, so as you can see, it takes a lot of stress off doing it in two seperate passes.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: Jim Corrigan\'s Nashville Guitars..

    Originally posted by sporter:
    One other thing...I usually record the first take without the keyswitches and go back and overbub the chord progressions with the keyswitch. Needless to say, the first pass sounds like hell with all major chords, but I find it too difficult to keep the strumming going on the right hand and changing the progression on the left. The chord changes work better if you hit them a split second prior to the beat, so as you can see, it takes a lot of stress off doing it in two seperate passes.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">I do exactly the same thing, except mirror opposite. I sketch out the keyswitches, then play the part. For a while, I actually got pretty good at the keyswitches, but the problem I had was that I learned Danny Lux\'s Acoustic Essentials first, then couldn\'t keep the two straight in my head...

  8. #8
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: Jim Corrigan\'s Nashville Guitars..

    You\'re right about the chord list. I would kill for suspended chords in that library. Still, as you know, it\'s one of those near perfect sounding sample libraries. I have always thought that Corrigan, Gary\'s GigaHarp, and Larry Seyer\'s Acoustic Bass are some of the best sounding sample libraries ever made, and they date back to the very beginnings of GigaSampler.

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