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Topic: The horns, more horns, and again horns

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  1. #1

    The horns, more horns, and again horns

    Tonight I attended a concert. A horn quartet playing several pieces, from Rossini to Hindemith (arrangements of course). Really great, four enthousiastic players from our Residentie Orchestra were playing for a selected audience. Normally a horn (or set of 4 horns) play their part in a Symphony and we are all satisfied about this. As one of the players explained to me, we are playing and nobody hears us.... except in Mahler, Wagner and some others. All I can say is: the horn is the most beautiful sounding instrument. When we write our own compositions, please give the horn the part they deserve!! Let them speak loudly, mellow and romantic.

    From now on I will give them a better and solistic role in my music. It was really all beauty tonight.

    Raymond
    [BTW they ended the concert with Wagner Tubas, a great piece, rather complicated. But that sound!!! Wonderful.]

  2. #2

    Re: The horns, more horns, and again horns

    I love the sound of the horns. I use them all the time - and doubled with the strings creates a wonderful full sound as they blend together.

    I do however use large horn sections, sometimes to drive a melody - but a solo horn is even better in the right moments.
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  3. #3

    Re: The horns, more horns, and again horns

    Raymond, Plowking, and other talented composers and or arrangers:

    If you like the horn (and you should), You will LOVE the EUPHONIUM!!!

    Ask me if you want examples or have questions.

    Snorlax.
    Jim Williams
    Professor of Capitalism
    N9EJR
    Indianapolis Brass Choir
    All Your Bass Sus&Short Are Belong to Us.

  4. #4

    Re: The horns, more horns, and again horns

    Hèhè, Snorlax. We love the Euphy as well......

    Raymond

  5. #5

    Re: The horns, more horns, and again horns

    I know that John Williams sure does love his horns (so do I for that matter), and they're quite easy to hear in most of his works. Such a wonderful instrument for either blending and supporting texture, or taking the lead and playing melody, or (personal favorite) doubling a melodic cello line.
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  6. #6

    Re: The horns, more horns, and again horns

    another cool thing is how awesome horns sound when they are used with wind instruments, (no other brass, strings or percussion) just woodwinds and horns
    Dan

  7. #7

    Re: The horns, more horns, and again horns

    Michael135==>Such a wonderful instrument for either blending and supporting texture, or taking the lead and playing melody, or (personal favorite) doubling a melodic cello line.

    Same for the euphonium!!! A cello is just a wooden euphonium. We play a lot of cello music--I have played Bach, Haydn, Schumann, etc. cello pieces.

    DPDAN==>another cool thing is how awesome horns sound when they are used with wind instruments, (no other brass, strings or percussion) just woodwinds and horns

    Same for the euphonium!! Euphonium and woods is a great combo. In a jazz setting, I have done euphonium and tenor, and tried to recreate Brookmeyer and Mulligan using euphonium and bari sax.

    I also play rondo movements of a couple Mozart Horn Concertos and the Concert Rondo--as written--on euphonium.

    C'mon you composers/arrangers...start using the euphonium!!
    Jim Williams
    Professor of Capitalism
    N9EJR
    Indianapolis Brass Choir
    All Your Bass Sus&Short Are Belong to Us.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Frank D's Avatar
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    Re: The horns, more horns, and again horns

    Hi Snor/Jim ...

    So this is the most press the euphonium has had on this site in all of 2012! Good show!

    Re: Great horn (or 'euph') voicings: A classic, elegant, glowing brass favorite of Henry Mancini was to cluster four horns (when horns had the melody) in the middle to middle-high register over four open (or bucket-muted) trombones in a wide-open spread voicing w/ bass trombone on low roots, all w/ no vibrato. The great thing w/ this voicing (when the horns are carrying the lead) is they can dip into the top trombone notes w/ no loss of balance. It really is a gorgeous sound.

    QUESTION, Professor: I just spent a half-hour on trying to learn the difference between the euphonium and the baritone horn. (BTW, dwerden.com site was helpful!) The best I could determine is euph=conical tubing, usually has a 4th valve for compensating in low register, and has a darker, bigger sound. Baritone=cylindrical tubing, always 3-valve, and has a slightly brighter and lighter sound. (One other reoccuring opinion was euph=$$$$ and baritone=$$.) What say you, sir?

    Good thread ... now I have to get over and listen some more to your great listening room piece!

    Regards,

    Frank

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