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Topic: Gigasampler response: 20-20K???

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  1. #1

    Gigasampler response: 20-20K???

    Does anyone know what the frequency response of GS is? Does it reproduce 20-20k (assuming reasonably low distortion figures throughout the range)?

    If so, what is the frequency response of the average sample? And, in particular, what is the frequency response of Gigapiano and Steinway B?

    John Grant http://artists.mp3s.com/artists/42/john_lewis_grant.html

  2. #2

    Re: Gigasampler response: 20-20K???

    I assume its FR is up to 22K cos of its sampling frequency. GS works internaly at 44,1k therefore its max freq is approx 22k. Most of the GS samples is 44,1k also.

    hope this helps

  3. #3

    Re: Gigasampler response: 20-20K???

    Viktor, is right. All digital has a maximum frequency of half the sampling rate (Nyquist frequency), i.e. a 44.1khz sampling rate has a max frequency of 22khz. In the real world it is never as high due to brickwall filters found in the digital recorders to prevent distortion. That is why you see digital recording now at 24 bit 96khz sample rate, to get extended frenquency response (but the downside penalty is twice the file size). Most samples are now recorded at 16 bit 44.1khz sample rate or lower. Most cheap sound cards are not flat up to 20khz. Additionally anything other than 16 bit 44.1khz sample rate suffers from the conversion into a CD process. As computers and sound cards are now capable of 24 bit 96khz sample rate, but CD\'s are still 16 bit 44.1khz sample rate, all the extra clarity gained may be just a case of diminished returns right now. If you can hear the difference after converting to CD by recording with a better standard all through the process great, but most people would be better served spending that time on the music. In my opinion, recording audio at 20-24 bit, 48 khz sample rate, and using standard samples recorded at 16 bit 44.1khz sample rate, seems to be the best compromise at the moment for making a CD end product. Sound is very subjective, let your own ears guide you. A good soundcard is key however, spend time researching and most of all listening. There is so much hype around specs, with all audio equipment, you should listen to it before you buy. As for samples you have the choice of using the standard 16 bit 44.1khz recorded stuff out there or record your own at a better setting, if a market appears for 24 bit 96khz samples, I\'m sure that someone will tap into it. Many samples just sound better than others, it could be the instrument or musician or microphone or recorder or any other varible, let your own ears be the judge. If the music grooves you can get away with some horrible recording and or samples. Quick, dirty, and no frequecy response can work if the music is right.

  4. #4

    Re: Gigasampler response: 20-20K???

    Viktor, is right. All digital has a maximum frequency of half the sampling rate (Nyquist frequency), i.e. a 44.1khz sampling rate has a max frequency of 22khz. In the real world it is never as high due to brickwall filters found in the digital recorders to prevent distortion. That is why you see digital recording now at 24 bit 96khz sample rate, to get extended frenquency response (but the downside penalty is twice the file size). Most samples are now recorded at 16 bit 44.1khz sample rate or lower. Most cheap sound cards are not flat up to 20khz. Additionally anything other than 16 bit 44.1khz sample rate suffers from the conversion into a CD process. As computers and sound cards are now capable of 24 bit 96khz sample rate, but CD\'s are still 16 bit 44.1khz sample rate, all the extra clarity gained may be just a case of diminished returns right now. If you can hear the difference after converting to CD by recording with a better standard all through the process great, but most people would be better served spending that time on the music. In my opinion, recording audio at 20-24 bit, 48 khz sample rate, and using standard samples recorded at 16 bit 44.1khz sample rate, seems to be the best compromise at the moment for making a CD end product. Sound is very subjective, let your own ears guide you. A good soundcard is key however, spend time researching and most of all listening. There is so much hype around specs, with all audio equipment, you should listen to it before you buy. As for samples you have the choice of using the standard 16 bit 44.1khz recorded stuff out there or record your own at a better setting, if a market appears for 24 bit 96khz samples, I\'m sure that someone will tap into it. Many samples just sound better than others, it could be the instrument or musician or microphone or recorder or any other varible, let your own ears be the judge. If the music grooves you can get away with some horrible recording and or samples. Quick, dirty, and no frequecy response can work if the music is right.

  5. #5

    Re: Gigasampler response: 20-20K???

    Well, except if GS(t) does something funny internally, frequency response is not an issue. It is simply mixing and playing back the samples. Consequently the freq response is basically determined by the sample itself, and the rest of the sound chain.

    If you stay digital all the way, this will typically be determined by the first D/A converter the signal strikes (e.g. in the end-user\'s CD player), barring any \"frequency-reducing\" processing which may occur along the way.

    Without getting too technical, there is actually no such thing as a brickwall filter. Which is why a filter has to start rolling off earlier, which is why one looses frequency response. But this is not necessarily a problem at 44.1kHz - one can oversample and do the rest digitally.

    There is actually also another reasoning behind 96kHz, and that is the potential for reducing jitter-effects.


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