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Topic: Be Thou My Vision

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  1. #1

    Be Thou My Vision

    So, I've never written for guitar before (and it probably shows), but I thought I'd offer this out there anyway. I was asked to arrange "Be Thou My Vision" for Penny Whistle, Violin, and Guitar.

    http://soundcloud.com/c-foster-payne/be-thou-my-vision

  2. #2
    Senior Member fastlane's Avatar
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    Re: Be Thou My Vision

    I thought you did a good job with the guitar. I'm not familiar with this music but your arrangement sounded fine to me.

    Nice Irish music.

    Well done!



    Phil

  3. #3

    Re: Be Thou My Vision

    Very nice work. I had to boost the volume a good bit though. Can't see the real waveform as soundcloud shows a fake image of one, so I image it would benefit from a very light compression and pushing the output up.
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  4. #4

    Re: Be Thou My Vision

    This is calming to listen to. I like it. Your guitar part sounds fine to me but I wish Garritan would come up with a
    decent sounding nylon string guitar.
    Jay

  5. #5

    Re: Be Thou My Vision

    Thanks, guys. I'll look into the volume issue. I don't often write for small ensembles, but several people in my church have recently asked for some arrangements like this (I have a brass quintet and a tuba duet I'll be working on next). I think working with a limited canvas will be good for me--teach me how to be more efficient in my writing.

  6. #6
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    Re: Be Thou My Vision

    Very nice. I think you did a good job with the guitar part - I've played around with trying to get a good guitar sound and it always comes out sounding like a keyboard player.... I do agree with Plowking about the volume. A tuba duet sounds interesting - not an instrument I usually think of being played in a church as a solo, but then I have seen a tuba ensemble play Christmas songs so I know the sound can be beautiful...
    Trent P. McDonald

  7. #7

    Re: Be Thou My Vision

    Quote Originally Posted by jaynkate01 View Post
    This is calming to listen to. I like it. Your guitar part sounds fine to me but I wish Garritan would come up with a
    decent sounding nylon string guitar.
    Jay
    JABB has a really nice 10 string nylon classical guitar sampled and played by one of Garritan's finest beta testers named Karl Garrett.

    here is a quickie I did back some time ago with Karl's guitar.

    Silent Night

  8. #8

    Re: Be Thou My Vision

    I really like your arrangement, Fossman. Some interesting, fairly intricate harmonic lines laid in with the pleasant, simple structure of the song.

    --You didn't say what the sources of your sounds were, and everyone's talking about the guitar. Maybe you'll surprise them all by saying it's a real guitar?

    Really nice to hear some music from you.

    Randy

  9. #9

    Re: Be Thou My Vision

    Hello there! Thanks for sharing this, it does indeed have a soothing quality to it. The guitar is an instrument I know very little about, so I would never write for one, but you seem to have handled this very well!
    Michael Obermeyer, Jr.
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  10. #10

    Cool Re: Be Thou My Vision

    Quote Originally Posted by rbowser- View Post
    You didn't say what the sources of your sounds were, and everyone's talking about the guitar. Maybe you'll surprise them all by saying it's a real guitar?
    LOL... that would be ironic, eh? Sorry to disappoint, however. The instrumentation was the GPO4 Piccolo (non-vibrato) standing in for the Penny Whistle (is the PW in World Instruments, I wonder?), the Solo Strad from GPO4, and the Accoustic Guitar from JABB (specifically the instrument packaged ith Finale 2012).

    I can't explain how hard it is for me to write for a small ensemble. I taught myself the basics of composition and orchestration using a full MIDI orchestra (or what I thought was correct instrumentation until I went to school) while in the Air Force. I spent years writing this way and I'm positive I learned some bad habits, one of them being not understanding how to keep things simple--with an orchestra you always have such a huge canvas to draw on that simply wasn't ever really necessary for me back then, although I am painfully learning that lesson now--amateur players, such as those in church orchestras, don't like a steady diet of complicated stuff. Another bad habit was not knowing how to use a limited canvas (small ensemble).

    When I finally went to college and learned theory and rudimentary orchestration (someday I will go back and finish my education...that's a whole other topic, however) I think I was in the mindset of proving how "good" I was already and so missed out on some very important lessons. Fortunately I did retain the lessons about voice leading and movement (theory actually has its uses... it gives you a basic set of rules that assist you in making music sound more natural to the ear, and when combined with your natural imagination and instinct can produce truly amazing passages--at least that's my opinion), and I've gone back and re-studied my old texts. For orchestration I swear by Sam Adler's book (although the man himself I wasn't so much impressed with--"Music should not be written for the peasants," he said in a lecture I attended. Ha!).

    Hmm... sorry. I started rambling. Isn't 37 too young to start rambling? Sheesh! Anyway, I am finding writing for small ensembles very educational for me as a composer. Frustrating at times, but fulfilling when I start to "get it."

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