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Topic: Deconstructing Sgt. Peppers

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  1. #1
    Senior Member fastlane's Avatar
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    Deconstructing Sgt. Peppers

    These are the raw tracks from the "bounce" 4 track recorder. Two 4 track recorders were used with the first 4 tracks bounced to the second recorder and then additional vocals and instruments added. The last track is the crowd noise with the first three tracks.

    This also demonstrates what a great mix and edit can do for a recording if you then listen to the album cut.






  2. #2
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Re: Deconstructing Sgt. Peppers

    As a Beatles fan, way too cool.
    Styxx

  3. #3

    Re: Deconstructing Sgt. Peppers

    Phil, that's a fantastic find - Love it! How in the heck did the person get these tracks to put it up, I wonder? Gotta share this with my fellow Beatlemaniac friend in England. Thanks!

    Randy

  4. #4
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Re: Deconstructing Sgt. Peppers

    Are you using "Jammit"?
    Styxx

  5. #5
    Senior Member fastlane's Avatar
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    Re: Deconstructing Sgt. Peppers

    Quote Originally Posted by Styxx View Post
    Are you using "Jammit"?
    No, I'm using a Bartender's Friend.

    Seriously, these are the real deal man. The authentic tracks from Abbey Road Studio!



    Phil

  6. #6

    Re: Deconstructing Sgt. Peppers

    Quote Originally Posted by fastlane View Post
    No, I'm using a Bartender's Friend.

    Seriously, these are the real deal man. The authentic tracks from Abbey Road Studio!



    Phil
    Seriously though, where in the heck are these YouTube posters coming up with the original un-mixed masters from Abbey Road?--Have they been released to the public? It's so bizarre!

    Randy

  7. #7
    Senior Member fastlane's Avatar
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    Re: Deconstructing Sgt. Peppers

    Quote Originally Posted by rbowser- View Post
    Seriously though, where in the heck are these YouTube posters coming up with the original un-mixed masters from Abbey Road?--Have they been released to the public? It's so bizarre!

    Randy
    I know as much as you do Randy. If you go to YouTube and pull down the more tab the track info is there. This person knew or had access to the recording technique info. I always assumed it was recorded on a 4 track not two 4 tracks and I didn't know that 8 track recorders even existed in 1967 but there one in LA in 1966 and probably one in London soon after that. We forget how expensive and exotic all this gear was at the time. I read that the Pet Sounds vocals tracks were recorded in Columbia Studios not Capital because they had that one 8 track recorder. Studio time costs must have been enormous.

    The Channel this video comes from is totally blank like they want to remain anonymous. The question is why hasn't this video been pulled by Apple Corp. Are they unaware of it or what?

    I haven't found anything else like this on YouTube. Just some copy cats that don't have anything. I'm going to try and DL it before it's gone.




    Phil

  8. #8

    Re: Deconstructing Sgt. Peppers

    The most authoritative book that I know about what went on in the Beatles recording sessions is THE COMPLETE BEATLES RECORDING SESSIONS by Mark Lewisohn. According to him, the Beatles were initially recorded on two track stereo, but even from their earliest recordings (basically everything after "Love Me Do") they did edit pieces that were added to the master. This was used for things like allowing John to play the harmonica and sing on the same song. They eventually progressed to four tracks and finally eight. But, in both cases, they would do reduction mixes, where several tracks would be mixed to a single track, to free up channels so that more tracks could be added.

    When I was in high school, back in the early seventies, our music teacher had a Teac 4 track reel to reel (which, amazingly, he let us use, even though we were just a bunch of kids). On that machine, we would record three tracks, then bounce to the fourth, to record another two tracks, then mix down again to the third, and so on. This was all done on a single machine and the quality (with quarter inch tape) suffered - especially when you consider that we had to do a lot of takes to get it right.

    The Beatles, of course, had much better equipment. They could bounce a lot and preserve the quality. Also, the sound was very compressed, without a lot of highs and lows, and heavily processed, which probably made any loss of fidelity less noticable. PEPPER was recorded on 4 track. It was an earlier time. They probably couldn't bounce the tracks internally on the same machine or didn't want to, so they could get more tracks if they used two machines. From my reading of the book mentioned above, it also seems like they used multiple recorders for special effects (like tape delay or tape loops). The fact that impressed me most was that they didn't have a synth until the Abby Road album -- and that they showed remarkable restraint when they finally used it. Easy to forget that now.

    Allegro Data Solutions

  9. #9

    Re: Deconstructing Sgt. Peppers

    It's a good thing I didn't have anything pressing to do yesterday because I was glued to YouTube watching this along with "The Making of Sgt Pepper" along with every other Beatles link.
    Thanks very much Phil, very interesting and enjoyable!
    Randy

    BTW, anyone besides me that thought it was John that yelled "I've got blisters on my fingers" at the end of Helter Skelter?

  10. #10

    Re: Deconstructing Sgt. Peppers

    Not me. It's clearly Ringo with the blisters. His voice is very distinict. John and Paul are harder for me to tell apart sometimes because they were such gifted mimics and could immitate each other so well.

    The revelation that suprised me the most was that John (not Paul) apparently sung the harmony on "Come Together" (though Paul apparently wrote the part). Supposedly the keyboard solo was also composed by Paul and played by John in the final take. Paul "only" played the bass on that one.

    Allegro Data Solutions

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