• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Topic: Just how many samples of the same note are there?

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Just how many samples of the same note are there?

    So here's something I've been wondering, just how many samples are there of the same note? I'm guessing it's different for every instrument/instrument section. Also, what triggers a different sample? Is the same sample used for CC1 values 1-X then a different sample for CC1 values of X-Y etc? I know about the variability controllers but I was wondering just wondering what triggered a different sample outside of CC23.

    Is the attack (velocity) it's own sample for the strings?

    -Dane

  2. #2

    Re: Just how many samples of the same note are there?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dane Grant View Post
    So here's something I've been wondering, just how many samples are there of the same note? I'm guessing it's different for every instrument/instrument section. Also, what triggers a different sample? Is the same sample used for CC1 values 1-X then a different sample for CC1 values of X-Y etc? I know about the variability controllers but I was wondering just wondering what triggered a different sample outside of CC23.

    Is the attack (velocity) it's own sample for the strings?

    -Dane
    Hi, Dane - You didn't specify, but I'll guess you're talking about GPO-?

    Working backwards through your post, CC23 doesn't trigger a new sample. Most of the programming in the Garritan Libraries involves working with filter changes, so that different velocity levels and CC1 Volume changes effect the sample's sounds through changing the brightness, the time it takes for the initial attack to enfold, and things like that.

    The piano in GPO has 2 velocity layers I think, triggered by different velocity values. But I don't think the other instruments use different samples when played back at different velocities--I'm rather sure the change in tonality you hear is all done with clever programming which effects the play back of the raw sample pool.

    Randy

  3. #3

    Re: Just how many samples of the same note are there?

    Hey, thanks for the quick response Randy. Yes I was referring to GPO.

    I guess I misunderstood how it all worked. I thought the CC23 controller was giving me a different sample. I didn't realize it was a filtered variation of the same sample. So how many variations or "layers" are there for the various instruments or is there one main sample and several variations via filtering?

  4. #4

    Re: Just how many samples of the same note are there?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dane Grant View Post
    Hey, thanks for the quick response Randy. Yes I was referring to GPO.

    I guess I misunderstood how it all worked. I thought the CC23 controller was giving me a different sample. I didn't realize it was a filtered variation of the same sample. So how many variations or "layers" are there for the various instruments or is there one main sample and several variations via filtering?
    I can't say definitively how many samples are involved in all these instruments - There are programmers who are infrequent visitors who could answer you more specifically. But I've given you my basic understanding of how GPO has been programmed.

    How many variations and layers - I have no idea, but understand the variations to be rather limitless since they're tied to the 127 levels available in each MIDI controller.

    Your last sentence says what I've tried to explain of my understanding - that the dynamic variations in GPO are due to programming, manipulating the sound on a per-sample basis.

    All that matters is, as they say, the proof is in the pudding, and GPO is one tasty pudding. However they make it all work, GPO is a tremendous asset to anyone's arsenal, as I'm sure you agree.

    Randy

  5. #5

    Re: Just how many samples of the same note are there?

    Oh definitely, I have nothing but good things to say about GPO. I love the samples, I love the player, I love how light it is on my CPU, and I love the community. I was just curious.

    I've been considering sampling my Les Paul. I have no idea where to begin with that type of thing. I just thought it would be a fun project to do on the side for 2012. I started thinking about how many times I would have to pick a note and then I started wondering how many times the GPO instrumentalists had to do the same thing (bless their souls). Then I started wondering just how many recordings there were.

    It's all quite the science.

  6. #6

    Re: Just how many samples of the same note are there?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dane Grant View Post
    Oh definitely, I have nothing but good things to say about GPO. I love the samples, I love the player, I love how light it is on my CPU, and I love the community. I was just curious.

    I've been considering sampling my Les Paul. I have no idea where to begin with that type of thing. I just thought it would be a fun project to do on the side for 2012. I started thinking about how many times I would have to pick a note and then I started wondering how many times the GPO instrumentalists had to do the same thing (bless their souls). Then I started wondering just how many recordings there were.

    It's all quite the science.
    Neat project idea, Dane, to sample your Les Paul. You're probably aware of how difficult it is to get guitar samples to sound very natural with MIDI, but companies like Music Lab have made incredibly detailed guitar libraries which can sound great. They're in the several hundred dollar per instrument range.

    For doing what you'll be trying, here are some things you'll need to check out:

    AUDACITY

    That's a free sound editor that a lot of people use. You can record directly into it, and edit your samples.

    The other thing you'll need to look at:

    sfZed

    That's an editor for putting together SFZ files. Follow the instructions, and it generates the SFZ script.

    The basic concept is that you record your samples, edit them, put them in a folder. Then you assemble the script which makes the samples playable on a keyboard. The SFZ text is put in the same master folder with the samples.

    --easier said than done. The biggest difficulty is getting samples to loop smoothly. You may not need loops with your guitar samples though. Just record them for the full length of how long it takes for guitar notes to fade. And don't record any effect with them. Just good and loud, probably normalized in Audacity. Then when you use the final product, you'd use an amp simulator on the guitar track.

    You'll be able to record notes played with various degrees of aggressiveness, and then make different layers which are triggered by velocity. For instance a softly plucked note could be triggered by velocity values of 0 to 64, medium strength notes could be from 65 to 100, and the most aggressively played notes could be triggered by velocities of 101 to 127. That's the sort of thing we were talking about with your original topic of this thread.

    It would be very cool for you to have a virtual version of your Les Paul that can be played in Aria! Take a look at the stuff I posted - It'll be a lot of work, but could be a really fun project.

    Randy

  7. #7

    Re: Just how many samples of the same note are there?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dane Grant View Post
    I've been considering sampling my Les Paul. I have no idea where to begin with that type of thing. I just thought it would be a fun project to do on the side for 2012. I started thinking about how many times I would have to pick a note and then I started wondering how many times the GPO instrumentalists had to do the same thing (bless their souls).
    Check my tutorial on how to sample your own instrument for Aria:
    http://bartruffle.blogspot.com/2011/...-tutorial.html

  8. #8

    Re: Just how many samples of the same note are there?

    Hey thanks for the info. I have audacity. I mainly use it for converting wavs to mp3 since I only have the studio version of Sonar 6. That's the goal, to record the samples and then make it playable in Aria for the GPO community. (I have no commercial intentions.) There are a lot of things I need to figure out first though. I would like to somehow split the signal between the two pickups so that way people could control how much volume of each pickup they want since that's one of the advantages to have a Les Paul to begin with. Obviously this is way too advanced for someone like me to get into but I'm confident all of this is possible. (Doing the same thing with the tone knobs would be awesome.) I was actually considering having 6-8 layers of attack per note. The lowest two or 3 would be hammer-ons and pull offs (When you create the sound by pushing your finger on the string instead of plucking the string with a pick and when you create the sound by letting go) The rest would be brighter versions of each. I'm also considering sampling slides. The samples will be dry too. The guitar is such a cool instrument because of just how many dynamic sounds you can create with it.

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •