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Topic: Loudness wars

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  1. #1

    Loudness wars

    Just stumbled on the following as I was perusing Wikipedia's music notation article:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/20/ar...c/20noise.html

    This may be of particular interest to those of you who compose music electronically, but with the aim of getting live performances.

    P.S. If it's not already happening here in the US, the NY Times article may be a preview of coming attractions for American orchestras.

    Steve
    If you'd like to hear a couple of pieces I might actually finish someday, please visit my virtual concert hall.

  2. #2

    Re: Loudness wars

    Interesting article. . .

    Lots of thoughts run through my (sometimes manic) mind as I read this article. But I do have one silly-stupid comment to make which I share purely for the kicks and the giggles (and not to be taken seriously at all! LOL!) Given the new law at hand, I wonder if any British orchestras will play Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture (complete with loud canon blasts) anytime soon?

    By the way (shared as an aside), I looked up Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture just a few moments ago. Because the last time I heard this piece (during a live performance of this piece) around our country's Independence Day celebration, I always thought it was some kind of tribute to the War of 1812 (between England and the U.S). I guess like many Americans on this subject matter, I was wrong. (I'm so embarrassed! LOL!) Anyway, for anyone interested about a LOUD orchestral number titled the 1812 Overture, here's a blurp from the article about it:

    For the past 30+ years, Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture has been performed during countless United States' Independence Day celebrations, due largely in part to an exhilarating performance by the Boston Pops in 1974, conducted by Arthur Fiedler. In an effort to increase ticket sales, Fiedler choreographed fireworks, cannons, and a steeple-bell choir to the overture, as Tchaikovsky himself called for the use of cannons in his score. Many American's believe that Tchaikovsky's overture represents the USA's victory against the British Empire during the War of 1812, however, Tchaikovsky actually tells the story of Napoleon's retreat from Russia in 1812. In fact, Tchaikovsky even references the French national anthem La Marsillaise and Russia's God Save the Czar within the music. The USA was quick to adopt the piece, as it found itself lacking in the patriotic song department.
    http://classicalmusic.about.com/od/r...2-Overture.htm

    There are so many ironies that I find with this that I'm giggling while I write this post. (I have no life whatsoever!)

    Anyway. . . I guess we need to be careful NOT to write loud music.

    I feel like writing a composition using lots of cymbols crashes, banging on tin trash cans and canon shots (that would make Tchaikovsky proud!). I'm gonna title the orchestral piece, "Dainty and Demure".

    Happy composing, folks!

    Ted
    Music and humor are healthy for the soul.

  3. #3

    Re: Loudness wars

    Quote Originally Posted by efiebke View Post
    Interesting article. . .

    Lots of thoughts run through my (sometimes manic) mind as I read this article. But I do have one silly-stupid comment to make which I share purely for the kicks and the giggles (and not to be taken seriously at all! LOL!) Given the new law at hand, I wonder if any British orchestras will play Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture (complete with loud canon blasts) anytime soon?

    By the way (shared as an aside), I looked up Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture just a few moments ago. Because the last time I heard this piece (during a live performance of this piece) around our country's Independence Day celebration, I always thought it was some kind of tribute to the War of 1812 (between England and the U.S). I guess like many Americans on this subject matter, I was wrong. (I'm so embarrassed! LOL!) Anyway, for anyone interested about a LOUD orchestral number titled the 1812 Overture, here's a blurp from the article about it:



    http://classicalmusic.about.com/od/r...2-Overture.htm

    There are so many ironies that I find with this that I'm giggling while I write this post. (I have no life whatsoever!)

    Anyway. . . I guess we need to be careful NOT to write loud music.

    I feel like writing a composition using lots of cymbols crashes, banging on tin trash cans and canon shots (that would make Tchaikovsky proud!). I'm gonna title the orchestral piece, "Dainty and Demure".

    Happy composing, folks!

    Ted
    Great concept, Ted, and I'm giggling with you on that one! As far as not witing loud music, I'll say WHAT??!!??

    Steve
    If you'd like to hear a couple of pieces I might actually finish someday, please visit my virtual concert hall.

  4. #4

    Re: Loudness wars

    I write the LOUDEST music I can! I am already so deaf I can hardly hear it.

    Arvid Hand
    Theory-Comp./Piano
    ASCAP

  5. #5

    Re: Loudness wars

    huh?...................

  6. #6

    Re: Loudness wars

    My voice, alone, would probably get me fired should such a "volume" law become enacted in the U.S.!! Most of my patients are very hard of hearing and I tend to speak LOUDLY and CLEARLY to them. My co-workers are always telling me to talk more quietly!

    By the way, I work nights! Yikes!!


    SSSHHHHHhhhhhhhhh
    Music and humor are healthy for the soul.

  7. #7

    Re: Loudness wars

    Quote Originally Posted by efiebke View Post
    My voice, alone, would probably get me fired should such a "volume" law become enacted in the U.S.!! Most of my patients are very hard of hearing and I tend to speak LOUDLY and CLEARLY to them. My co-workers are always telling me to talk more quietly!

    By the way, I work nights! Yikes!!


    SSSHHHHHhhhhhhhhh
    Ah, Ted, you and I share something in common. I have a voice that someone once kindly described as "stentorian". I could easily talk to a crowd in a large room without a mic. I know what you mean about the challenge of "volume control", and while I'm doing better with that these days, talking on a cell phone seems to still be a problem for some reason. Go figure!

    Cheers!

    Steve
    If you'd like to hear a couple of pieces I might actually finish someday, please visit my virtual concert hall.

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