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Topic: REVELATION - Choir & Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

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  1. #21

    Re: REVELATION - Choir & Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Hello Fabio!

    Quote Originally Posted by fabiolcati View Post
    Maestro,
    you see, I'm not great at analyzing music – neither in my own language – so I let myself rely on the pure pleasure of listening. And your work gives me always a lot of it.
    Thank you for the kind words, Fabio.

    PS. I recently stepped into the music of Kalevi Aho and Gloria Coates. May I ask you if you like their work?
    I am familiar with both names, but have heard only a very
    little of the music of either of them... too little to really
    make any intelligent comment, my friend.

    My best,



    David
    -----
    David Sosnowski
    www.DavidSosnowski.com

  2. #22

    Re: REVELATION - Choir & Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    David, glad to drop by and find this here. An orchestral masterpiece - well recorded and rendered with good range of dynamics. Just like a great photo - deep, rich blacks all the way to bright, subtle highlights!

    I would concur with the percussion issues near the beginning that a certain Cowboy pointed out but it sounds like you are well aware of the situation. The rest is truly excellent!

    If you have not already checked out Requiem Pro or Voxos for choirs you really should. Even Native Instruments Kontakt 4 comes with a not too shabby choir. For this forum, Gary G. did say that we should use "some" Garritan instruments not necessarily "all". The only reason I got Kontakt in the first place was because it was the only way to access the Garritan Stradivarius when it came out.

    Your work is always a revelation David!

    Del
    Music happens to be an art form that transcends language. - Herbie Hancock

    http://www.mdtcommunications.com

  3. #23

    Re: REVELATION - Choir & Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Man this is one was awesome! Great piece, David! This would sound awesome live!
    Garam Heo, Contemporary Christian Artist
    Music produced by Christopher and Craig Reeves
    http://www.garamheo.com
    http://www.youtube.com/GaramHeoMusic
    SUBSCRIBE TODAY AND JOIN OUR MAILING LIST FOR A FREE MUSIC DOWNLOAD!

  4. #24

    Re: REVELATION - Choir & Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Greetings, my dear Mr. S

    Ever since re-visiting the Listening Room for the first time in over a year, starting just a few days ago, something I've been looking forward to with great anticipation is to hear your new piece, "Revelation." I've been working my way down the list on the Forum's front page, and now the day has arrived when yours is my next piece to play.

    Your dramatic, juicy soundscape is playing for a second time as I type this. First time 'round, I found myself leaning back in my chair, eyes closed, speakers up, letting your piece take me to where it may. Now I'm excited to hear it all again as I post this greeting to you.

    The sensibilities of this particular piece appeal to me so much, it's probably my favorite Sosnowski - But I have catching up to do. I see from your website that I have quite a few more to hear. I can easily predict there are more "favorites" coming up for me.

    It's the completely unpredictable ebb and flow of drama in this that grabs me in the way I love for music to do. Exciting, very rewarding experience to be immersed in this creation of yours.

    AND, as I long ago came to expect, your rendering is impeccable. There's just some special Alchemy you've developed which makes for a Finale output which is simply unbeatable. It's totally beyond me how you manage it - Well, I do understand at least some of the mechanics involved, but it still never ceases to amaze me, the great results you get.

    You know I use a DAW, which I think is a more "down and dirty" way to put music together on a computer - it's the only way I can do it. I use Sibelius (begrudgingly) when I need to have some print outs - but if I was limited to using Sib for both notation AND recordings - I'd be lost. It's a horrible squawking mess when I'm working in notation, something I wouldn't want anyone else to hear, but the playback is sufficient for me to work. No, to make music for others to hear, I gotta get that muscular grip on things that I can in a DAW.

    Something I admire technically about this project is that even though the Garritan choir is limited in what it's capable of, you went ahead and had it play what you've written, artificial sounding attacks and pitch bends and all. It doesn't Matter that it's not a believable, ideal choir rendering - it's the best possible with that very limited "instrument," and we can clearly hear what you've written for a choir to sing - the only thing that really matters.

    Something I've always admired about your work is that while you clearly are thorough and meticulous in your composing, you're equally thorough when it comes to producing the recording/rendering of your work. You know that it's beneficial to present what you've written in the best light possible, so you put a lot of work into the aural results, not only caring about an accurate notation. Much appreciated.

    So, hats off to you for a fantastic recording of an exciting composition.

    Randy

  5. #25

    Re: REVELATION - Choir & Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Hi Del,

    Haven't seen you around in a while, Del -- nice to
    see you back at the forum!

    Quote Originally Posted by DelCarry View Post
    David, glad to drop by and find this here. An orchestral masterpiece - well recorded and rendered with good range of dynamics. Just like a great photo - deep, rich blacks all the way to bright, subtle highlights!
    An interesting comment... the analogy to light and
    color, in that sound has both for me.

    I would concur with the percussion issues near the beginning that a certain Cowboy pointed out but it sounds like you are well aware of the situation. The rest is truly excellent!
    Thanks, Del. Michel's right, of course. The problem
    is, I'm not sure why (the percussion). The aural layout
    in this is almost the same as that used in two prior
    pieces, Persistence of Vision and Spheres.

    If you have not already checked out Requiem Pro or Voxos for choirs you really should. Even Native Instruments Kontakt 4 comes with a not too shabby choir. For this forum, Gary G. did say that we should use "some" Garritan instruments not necessarily "all". The only reason I got Kontakt in the first place was because it was the only way to access the Garritan Stradivarius when it came out.
    Gary has no probelm with the inculsion of other libraries,
    and has said so variously. However, I have a problem
    paying $650 - $1000 for samples that are good but hardly
    great, and then being hog-tied to Native Instruments into
    the deal.

    Your work is always a revelation David!

    Del
    I appreciate the listen and the good thoughts, Del!

    All the best,



    David
    -----
    David Sosnowski
    www.DavidSosnowski.com

  6. #26

    Re: REVELATION - Choir & Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Quote Originally Posted by Craig Reeves View Post
    Man this is one was awesome! Great piece, David! This would sound awesome live!
    Good to see you here, Craig!

    Thanks for the kind comments.

    All my best,



    David
    -----
    David Sosnowski
    www.DavidSosnowski.com

  7. #27

    Re: REVELATION - Choir & Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Hi Randy,

    Quote Originally Posted by rbowser- View Post
    Greetings, my dear Mr. S

    Ever since re-visiting the Listening Room for the first time in over a year, starting just a few days ago, something I've been looking forward to with great anticipation is to hear your new piece, "Revelation." I've been working my way down the list on the Forum's front page, and now the day has arrived when yours is my next piece to play.
    I've missed you around the LR, my friend -- welcome back!

    Your dramatic, juicy soundscape is playing for a second time as I type this. First time 'round, I found myself leaning back in my chair, eyes closed, speakers up, letting your piece take me to where it may. Now I'm excited to hear it all again as I post this greeting to you.
    Two listens? I admire your endurance, Randy!

    The sensibilities of this particular piece appeal to me so much, it's probably my favorite Sosnowski - But I have catching up to do. I see from your website that I have quite a few more to hear. I can easily predict there are more "favorites" coming up for me.
    I believe you may have missed Spheres and Persistence of
    Vision
    , but are otherwise up to date.

    It's the completely unpredictable ebb and flow of drama in this that grabs me in the way I love for music to do. Exciting, very rewarding experience to be immersed in this creation of yours.
    Thanks, Randy, for the kind words. I always worry a little
    about that "unpredictable" factor... whether the ongoing
    development with little recursion to home might leave some
    too much asea.

    AND, as I long ago came to expect, your rendering is impeccable. There's just some special Alchemy you've developed which makes for a Finale output which is simply unbeatable. It's totally beyond me how you manage it - Well, I do understand at least some of the mechanics involved, but it still never ceases to amaze me, the great results you get.
    My use of Finale has been a subject of frequent inquiry and
    discussion over the years, at such length it approaches
    disquisition and to the point of passion where some have even
    implied an impugnment of my veracity... lol.

    But, as I've so many times said, there's no secret to it.
    Put on the page exactly what you want, and that's what
    Finale plays back.

    You know I use a DAW, which I think is a more "down and dirty" way to put music together on a computer - it's the only way I can do it. I use Sibelius (begrudgingly) when I need to have some print outs - but if I was limited to using Sib for both notation AND recordings - I'd be lost. It's a horrible squawking mess when I'm working in notation, something I wouldn't want anyone else to hear, but the playback is sufficient for me to work. No, to make music for others to hear, I gotta get that muscular grip on things that I can in a DAW.
    I imagine the DAW versus Notation Debates will continue long
    after I do not... lol.

    I believe much of the mystery surrounding getting a good
    rendering out of notation goes to a failure to recognize how
    little is really on the page, and how very much is interpretation
    by conductors and performers.

    What you do in a DAW is that very interpretation. And if
    you want notation to measure up (so to speak), well, you've
    got to notate that same interpretation.

    I've frequently heard the assertion that you cannot notate
    interpretation, of course -- but that's simply untrue. It
    takes effort and great attention to detail, but it's definitely
    quite doable.

    Something I admire technically about this project is that even though the Garritan choir is limited in what it's capable of, you went ahead and had it play what you've written, artificial sounding attacks and pitch bends and all. It doesn't Matter that it's not a believable, ideal choir rendering - it's the best possible with that very limited "instrument," and we can clearly hear what you've written for a choir to sing - the only thing that really matters.
    While I do recognize the shortcomings of the technology in
    this case, I might note that the end product sound is not
    so very far from reality. The choir in this piece is not treated
    traditionally, but rather as just another instrumental section.

    Something I've always admired about your work is that while you clearly are thorough and meticulous in your composing, you're equally thorough when it comes to producing the recording/rendering of your work. You know that it's beneficial to present what you've written in the best light possible, so you put a lot of work into the aural results, not only caring about an accurate notation. Much appreciated.

    So, hats off to you for a fantastic recording of an exciting composition.

    Randy
    Thank you for taking so much time with this piece, Randy,
    and for your thoughtful remarks!

    Always my best,



    David
    -----
    David Sosnowski
    www.DavidSosnowski.com

  8. #28

    Re: REVELATION - Choir & Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Oh my gosh, there’s so much to get caught up on when one’s been absent as long as I. Such a good place to start though!



    I’ve always considered you and Michel R. Edward to be the compositional cognoscenti of this forum. However, after seeing how much Michel has posted in the last year here, I shifted gears and decided to start with the ONE piece of yours I missed. Not sure it was such a great decision at this point though, since now I’ve listened to it for 3 days straight, several times per each of those days and haven’t gotten to hear anyone else’s. But alas, this is a good thing, because it’s a doozy!


    I can’t believe you did this last March! Now since you have completely forgotten about the piece, I can pontificate without any retribution . lol


    First off, please…please don’t say this is just another little ol’ study to continue your string of “study” hits over the past year. (referring to Spheres and Persistence of Vision ) If you do insist it is just another study and not a full, fledged masterpiece, then I’ll have no choice but to come to Connecticut and twist your arm! (Well, not really, because I’m not even sure where Connecticut is on the Eastern seaboard, and likewise, I’m not sure how to “twist “ one’s arm….so your safe.)


    The fabric of music you have so meticulously woven here is amazing---exciting, alluring, and incredibly engaging. You just keep getting better and better if that were even possible! Every time I listen to it, I hear something that I haven’t heard before which is why it so tantalizes my ear “chops”.


    As usual, it is adroitly conceived throughout it’s entire length. How you come up with such ideas I’ll never begin to figure out, but I’m so glad you do!


    So many members have responded to this piece during these past several months, I can’t really add to it without repeating what has already been said. But I will anyway. Please forgive me because I’m so taken with this composition, saying nothing would be a crime!!


    From the onset when you establish your first 4-note motif (which I will call the Beethoven’s 5th , for obvious reasons) and then develop it with the finesse that Beethoven did, I knew this was going to be a wild ride! I couldn’t help but revel in what you chose to do. Then you slowly introduce your downward minor punctuated 2nd motif, then switch gears with an absolutely wonderful adagio section, then back to the minor 2nd motif, but this time you add a rising triple up to it. The ensuing 5-note motif is so powerful I could barely sit still! Then your mixing and overlaying of the first 4-note motif with this 5-note motif was pure genius.



    I think the French Horns will either love you or hate you…not sure which. What a part!! I’ve only been brave enough to take them up to an “E” so far in my own compositions, you went all the way to an “F”! show no mercy…I like that!


    And your build up with the 5-note motif to the end is almost unbearable, but in a good way. Like the ending of Sibelius’s 2nd symphony, it just keeps building and building until you wouldn’t dare leave until it resolves. (I’ll have you know I missed dinner the first time I listened to this…just to prove my point.)


    I sincerely hope this is played by a real live human orchestra at some point. It is a knockout and deserves the exposure to audiences around the planet. Why you didn’t get more of a response on this from the forum is a bit of a mystery too, because it truly ranks with the best of the best.


    I always find myself asking why I love your music so much David, seeing that my own music style is so different from yours. I haven’t found the answer to that yet and probably never will. I just know it engages me fully and I revel in that.


    I think serious composers have to have some egocentric tendencies towards their own music—[one prefers their own music more than anyone else’s because they created it; although in reality, it might not be better, just different.] I do love my own music very much. So when I find someone else’s music that impresses me as much as my own, that’s pretty amazing. Guess what I’m trying to say here, (and not very well at that) is that this is the ultimate praise I can give to another composer –when I cherish their work as much as my own, as I do with this work.


    At any rate, Bravo my friend’; this is yet another masterpiece in my mind’s eye. Sorry to have taken so long to get back to you on this, it’s been a rough year but things are smoothing out now.


    Hope all is well on your end and that your fertile mine is in the process of conjuring up another composition which will undoubtedly be the “piece de resistance” following the last three incredible creations.
    My Best,


    Cass

  9. #29
    Senior Member
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    Re: REVELATION - Choir & Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Hey David - I'm glad Cass brought this back up to the top or I might have missed it. Great work as always. Not as "easy" as the last few I heard from you but still a "must hear". It has your trademark sound, as can be expected, while traveling new territory. I saw another new piece up but, after 2 times through this I didn't have time to listen. At least not tonight - you can be sure I will be back.
    Trent P. McDonald

  10. #30

    Re: REVELATION - Choir & Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Hello Cass!

    Quote Originally Posted by Cass Hansen View Post
    Oh my gosh, there’s so much to get caught up on when one’s been absent as long as I. Such a good place to start though!
    Good to see you here!

    I’ve always considered you and Michel R. Edward to be the compositional cognoscenti of this forum.
    After writing for many decades, I've come to the conclusion I actually know very little about composition -- so I would reserve that title for my esteemed colleague, Michel. You can ask him about this; I'm certain he'd agree with me.

    However, after seeing how much Michel has posted in the last year here, I shifted gears and decided to start with the ONE piece of yours I missed. Not sure it was such a great decision at this point though, since now I’ve listened to it for 3 days straight, several times per each of those days and haven’t gotten to hear anyone else’s. But alas, this is a good thing, because it’s a doozy!
    While I admire your endurance, Cass, I caution too much Sosnowski as potentially constipating...

    I can’t believe you did this last March! Now since you have completely forgotten about the piece, I can pontificate without any retribution . lol

    First off, please…please don’t say this is just another little ol’ study to continue your string of “study” hits over the past year. (referring to Spheres and Persistence of Vision ) If you do insist it is just another study and not a full, fledged masterpiece, then I’ll have no choice but to come to Connecticut and twist your arm! (Well, not really, because I’m not even sure where Connecticut is on the Eastern seaboard, and likewise, I’m not sure how to “twist “ one’s arm….so your safe.)
    I've carefully concealed Connecticut between Rhode Island and New York to make it more difficult to find.

    And, no, I would not call this piece a study. It has vague intentions of being a symphony, actually. There are a couple of sister pieces in the hopper; though I'm suffering some indecision as to whether the weight of and relationships amongst them is sufficient for that.

    The fabric of music you have so meticulously woven here is amazing---exciting, alluring, and incredibly engaging. You just keep getting better and better if that were even possible! Every time I listen to it, I hear something that I haven’t heard before which is why it so tantalizes my ear “chops”.
    Thanks for the kind words, Cass... which lead me to a matter of some concern. As you know by now, I use very little free material -- virtually every moment of a piece is somehow thematic. Lately I've come to think loosening up a little might be desirable.

    As usual, it is adroitly conceived throughout it’s entire length. How you come up with such ideas I’ll never begin to figure out, but I’m so glad you do!
    I tend to think of musical pieces (at least in certain regards) much as one thinks of building a house. (And yes, long ago, I did build houses for a while.) You have a great deal of latitude in design and decoration and style. But there are certain things you absolutely must do a certain way so the house does not fall down.

    That may not seem terribly inspirational. But conception? It's mostly craft, not some mysterious act of genius.

    So many members have responded to this piece during these past several months, I can’t really add to it without repeating what has already been said. But I will anyway. Please forgive me because I’m so taken with this composition, saying nothing would be a crime!!

    From the onset when you establish your first 4-note motif (which I will call the Beethoven’s 5th , for obvious reasons) and then develop it with the finesse that Beethoven did, I knew this was going to be a wild ride! I couldn’t help but revel in what you chose to do. Then you slowly introduce your downward minor punctuated 2nd motif, then switch gears with an absolutely wonderful adagio section, then back to the minor 2nd motif, but this time you add a rising triple up to it. The ensuing 5-note motif is so powerful I could barely sit still! Then your mixing and overlaying of the first 4-note motif with this 5-note motif was pure genius.
    Gee. I'm pleased somebody noted the doff of the cap to Ludwig... lol. Figures it would be you, Cass; you don't miss much.

    I think the French Horns will either love you or hate you…not sure which. What a part!! I’ve only been brave enough to take them up to an “E” so far in my own compositions, you went all the way to an “F”! show no mercy…I like that!
    A good horn player can handle it -- though you don't ever want to just slap a high F in their face without some proper preparation. They tend to pass gas when you do that.

    And your build up with the 5-note motif to the end is almost unbearable, but in a good way. Like the ending of Sibelius’s 2nd symphony, it just keeps building and building until you wouldn’t dare leave until it resolves. (I’ll have you know I missed dinner the first time I listened to this…just to prove my point.)
    That ending... I surely would not want to conduct that. Get it wrong, and the whole performance falls on its face. Even in the rendering, I'm not all that pleased with the way I conducted it myself...

    I sincerely hope this is played by a real live human orchestra at some point. It is a knockout and deserves the exposure to audiences around the planet. Why you didn’t get more of a response on this from the forum is a bit of a mystery too, because it truly ranks with the best of the best.
    Thanks, my friend. I imagine people have much else on their minds... these last few years have been very hard for so many.

    I always find myself asking why I love your music so much David, seeing that my own music style is so different from yours. I haven’t found the answer to that yet and probably never will. I just know it engages me fully and I revel in that.

    I think serious composers have to have some egocentric tendencies towards their own music—[one prefers their own music more than anyone else’s because they created it; although in reality, it might not be better, just different.] I do love my own music very much. So when I find someone else’s music that impresses me as much as my own, that’s pretty amazing. Guess what I’m trying to say here, (and not very well at that) is that this is the ultimate praise I can give to another composer –when I cherish their work as much as my own, as I do with this work.
    Everyone's different, I guess. I rarely give my own music much thought once I kick it out the door. Nor does it impress me. As I said earlier, I doubt I'm qualified to judge, though.

    At any rate, Bravo my friend’; this is yet another masterpiece in my mind’s eye. Sorry to have taken so long to get back to you on this, it’s been a rough year but things are smoothing out now.

    Hope all is well on your end and that your fertile mine is in the process of conjuring up another composition which will undoubtedly be the “piece de resistance” following the last three incredible creations.
    My Best,


    Cass
    Thanks, as always, Cass, for taking so much time with this!

    Always my best,



    David
    -----
    David Sosnowski
    www.DavidSosnowski.com

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