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Topic: Gigapiano questions

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  1. #1

    Gigapiano questions

    I am wondering why everybody is talking about Gigapiano having 1 gigabyte of samples, since the file is only 646MB? Do I have an old version?

    Also, Bruce Richardson, in a prorec.com article (Feb 2000) says that Gigapiano is the only one with release samples. IMHO, release samples are very important for improved realism. So is there any new piano sample library out there with release samples?

  2. #2

    Re: Gigapiano questions

    What do you think?
    Does GigaPiano ring better than 646mbPiano?
    Would you know a release sample if it bit you on the posterior?

  3. #3

    Re: Gigapiano questions

    With release samples GP sounds badly damped. Without them, it merely sounds badly miced.

    There\'s nothing wrong with killing a piano note with the amp or filter envelope. Better to focus on a great basic piano sound without problems first, there are few enough of these.

    I don\'t know about GP compression, but some Gsamples are compressed, so the file size doesn\'t reflect the data size. But really who cares about the size, I\'ve got better sounding pianos that are smaller, and better sounding pianos that are bigger...

  4. #4
    Senior Member LHong's Avatar
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    Re: Gigapiano questions

    It is about 1.1GB~1.3GB in the un-compressed format like wave.



  5. #5

    Re: Gigapiano questions

    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Sam:
    With release samples GP sounds badly damped. Without them, it merely sounds badly miced.

    There\'s nothing wrong with killing a piano note with the amp or filter envelope. Better to focus on a great basic piano sound without problems first, there are few enough of these.

    I don\'t know about GP compression, but some Gsamples are compressed, so the file size doesn\'t reflect the data size. But really who cares about the size, I\'ve got better sounding pianos that are smaller, and better sounding pianos that are bigger...
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Sam, you might be right for Gigapiano release samples. I was just referring to Bruce\'s article, and what he said made sense in my newbie mind. But I didn\'t really know what I was talking about (from a listening perspective).

    As for the file size, I was just wondering if I had an older, smaller version or something like that. I really don\'t mind about the file size.

    [This message has been edited by Radu Lupu (edited 10-24-2001).]

  6. #6

    Re: Gigapiano questions

    Hi. My Gigapiano installed itself (during GS160 installation) as being 662,482 Meg. As far as I am able to determine, it stays that size loaded & unloaded. (Yours is normal). I don\'t know what another reader meant by it being 1.1G. I have the Trachtman Steinway, and it came on a highly compressed WinRar disc (1.9Gig done up at around 3:1) and the actual core piano sound uncompressed to just over 1.1Gig. (There was other stuff on the disc). The Trachtman is a very rich piano, originally sampled at 16 strike layers (Warren had to release it as 8-layers, due to some limitations with GS), and some of its bass notes were allowed to decay for around 20 seconds (hence the size); plus, as a late 1800\'s piano (with 1990\'s mechanical restoration) it has loads of real old-growth hardwoods in it which resonate with tons of character.

    I found the Giga Yamaha a bit thin on dynamic range, so I merged/layered it (in GS editor) with the 364 meg HolyGrail Platinum Kawai. It swells to 1,027,549 KB, but you get the Grail\'s good dynamic range (esp. if your card allows 24/96 playback) and Grail\'s 4 notes-to-the-note sympathetic resonance adding realism to chords. Watch out with this latter feature: it makes GS160 only 40-note polyphonic (160/4). But it\'s worth it. Something in the release phase too, causes a momentary jump to 8 notes-to-the-note on the meter, but it\'s 4 notes-to-the-note on sustain. (When you hit one single note on a REAL acoustic piano and let it decay fully, nearly all notes in the adjacent scale eventually ring in sympathy). A prominent jazz teacher of mine said he rarely plays the 5th in chords, as it is already strongly present in the tonic (this is on a real grand) thus saving fingers for adding colour tones. When you hit 2 notes (an \"interval\") on a real acoustic, you get those notes, their 5 or more sympathetics, and, as Lyle Mays said in a recent interview, you get a whole third set of new resonances happening - something that our sampler folks are years away from capturing/recreating at this point. One might well say \"so what\", except that it is these sympathetics that really increase the poetry and beauty in music, and, allow simpler cleaner lines/structures to stand well on their own. We might all want to keep our eyes open for developments in this area - the research out of Padua on this is very good, and their algorithms don\'t seem to steal polyphony as set up in the GEM instruments. The GEM\'s new DRAKE system (Pro-Mega-3)looks promising - but it won\'t have the gobs of sample size that us Giga lovers are used to. (I am NOT affiliated in any way with any of these people). All we need is for all of this to come together in one beast! - namely, 2 or 3 Gigabyte sized pianos, 7 or 8 sympathetics per note, chord specific after-sympathetics, and a non-poly robbing algorithm as in the Padua research (so that GS doesn\'t have to be re-done to 320 or 640 poly - something Tascam has told me they won\'t be doing)....

    -Hope this helps. (Sorry all, for the length!!) -Stories.

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