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Topic: Best Acoustic Chord Strumming Library?

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  1. #1

    Re: Best Acoustic Chord Strumming Library?

    Jacaranda Guitar that we are selling have the following chordtypes:
    6th, 7th,
    9th, Argumented, Dim, Major, Minor, Maj7, Min7, Min9, Sus4 & Sus2.
    check out more info at www.biggagiggas.com

    /Worra

  2. #2

    Best Acoustic Chord Strumming Library?

    Sorry if this has already been posted, I did a search and didn\'t see anything recent. I\'m looking for a good acoustic library for doing some chord strumming. Need a wide variety of chord types, maj,min,sus, etc. Thanks for your suggestions!

  3. #3
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: Best Acoustic Chord Strumming Library?

    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Worra:
    Jacaranda Guitar that we are selling have the following chordtypes:
    6th, 7th,
    9th, Argumented, Dim, Major, Minor, Maj7, Min7, Min9, Sus4 & Sus2.
    check out more info at www.biggagiggas.com /Worra
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Another library you may want to look for is Danny Lux\'s Acoustic Essentials. It has a few less chord types, but has six and twelve string versions at three different strum \"speeds.\"

    Other guitar libraries containing strums are Jim Corrigan\'s Nashville High-Strung Guitars, but no suspensions in that library--it is very much \"country\" oriented but useful in other genres. For sure the \"high strung\" tuning/recording methodology is a ubiquitous presence in pop music, and it\'s a handy sound to have in your toolbox. None of the other libraries have this particular sound.

    The Matt Ragan Acoustic Steel-String Guitar also contains some strum samples, but it is not the main feature of the library. The Ragan guitar is more concentrated around playable mappings of many different pluck techniques.

    There may be more available than that, but those are the additional ones I know about.


  4. #4

    Re: Best Acoustic Chord Strumming Library?

    Worra, you said:

    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR> Jacaranda Guitar that we are selling have the following chordtypes: 6th, 7th, 9th, Argumented, Dim, Major, Minor, Maj7, Min7, Min9, Sus4 & Sus2 <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I\'m interested in the library, so I went to your site but didn\'t get much help in determining the actual chord sets there. While I would prefer these in an electric guitar, an acoustic version is useful if the chords are sufficiently flexible.

    Is there a list of the voicings? Are all chords in all 12 keys? Are any in more than one position/inversion? Are they mapped the way a guitarist would play them if playing in a specific hand position, or just moved up the neck chromatically?

    I believe you did say they were available as downstroke/upstroke. What about palm mute?

    Sorry for all the questions, but when you want to buy something you\'ll have no right to return or resell, the questions have to be a lot more explicit. For instruments like your Rhodes, Clav and pianos, demos tell the story, but chords are much more limited in use and scope, so more detail helps greatly.

    What it really comes down to is: if I were writing a song that moves from Cm to AbMAJ7 to F7, would the guitar chords follow the route or would they stay in the same hand position like a live guitarist (in this case, probably voiced with the same G always on top) or follow the root?

    And I suppose, peripherally, would I be better off initially with the Acoustic Essentials set? (I\'ll probably eventually have both, but this is about chording flexibility)

    Thanks

    Dasher


  5. #5

    Re: Best Acoustic Chord Strumming Library?

    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Bruce A. Richardson:
    Another library you may want to look for is Danny Lux\'s Acoustic Essentials. It has a few less chord types, but has six and twelve string versions at three different strum \"speeds.\"


    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    ...also distributed by Bigga Giggas...

    /Worra


  6. #6

    Re: Best Acoustic Chord Strumming Library?

    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by thesoundsmith:
    Worra, you said:

    I\'m interested in the library, so I went to your site but didn\'t get much help in determining the actual chord sets there. While I would prefer these in an electric guitar, an acoustic version is useful if the chords are sufficiently flexible.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


    Hi Dasher.

    I\'ve sent this question to John Thomas, who have made \"Jacaranda Guitar\". I\'m sure that he (when he wakes up....) will answer your question.

    /Worra

  7. #7

    Re: Best Acoustic Chord Strumming Library?

    Soundsmith wrote.....\"I\'m interested in the library, so I went to your site but didn\'t get much help in determining the actual chord sets there.\"
    The \"Help File\" for the Jacaranda Guitar is available online at the site with all the following questions answered....However, in case it isn\'t specific enough regarding these issues.Here goes....

    soundsmith wrote....\" While I would prefer these in an electric guitar, an acoustic version is useful if the chords are sufficiently flexible.\"

    This is only acoustic..Solidbody and Thinline Hollowbody sounds coming soon...but a separate CD..However, by adding Giga FX or other FX to playback, a good electric simulation can be achieved.Hear Blues demo mp3 of jacaranda.......I overdid the FX, but ya get the idea..

    Soundsmith wrote..\"Is there a list of the voicings? Are all chords in all 12 keys? Are any in more than one position/inversion? Are they mapped the way a guitarist would play them if playing in a specific hand position, or just moved up the neck chromatically?\"

    The most popular Chord Types.....have two or three inversions......The only ones that do not have at least two are the Aug & Dim and the \"Suspended 2nd\" which are so named because they are a popular chord form that is actually more like a piano major no 3rd chord..All chords are mapped so that the HAND POSITION is maintained like a true guitarist..To my knowledge this is the only library mapped this way...Frankly, I might choose the simpler \"Follow the Root\" type method on my Electric sets, because the different inversions all being in the same octave on the keyboard can create some occasional strangenesses....Even though a real guitarist would choose the inversions that are grouped together, it seems weird omnetimes to have a higher note on the keynboard trigger a chord which sounds decidedly lower due to guitar inversion voicings..

    Soundsmith wrote \"I believe you did say they were available as downstroke/upstroke. What about palm mute?\"

    While palm mutes are kinda controllable in a real playing situation, they tend to be more useful to me on electrics..Sorry, but I did not try to record these on the acoustic.

    Soundsmith wrote
    \"For instruments like your Rhodes, Clav and pianos, demos tell the story, but chords are much more limited in use and scope, so more detail helps greatly.\"
    Agree..However, the library contains Fingerpick and Flatpick solo notes. Recorded all the notes plus the three positions of Harmonics...Most solo note guitars are recorded in chromatic 3rds...The Jacaranda ones will actually voice better in using them to play chords than most other samples because true volume relational to the other notes was maintained throughout the single note recording passes..

    Soundsmith wrote..\"What it really comes down to is: if I were writing a song that moves from Cm to AbMAJ7 to F7, would the guitar chords follow the route or would they stay in the same hand position like a live guitarist (in this case, probably voiced with the same G always on top) or follow the root?\"

    Again, all chords mapped so that inversions are 1st Hand Postion, Second Hand Position and many include the third hand position..
    You do not have to know how to play guitar to choose what the guitarist would likely choose as the chord inversion.
    Hope this helps.....
    I agree with Bruce Richardsons\' overall recommendations..The Acoustic Essentials uses only one octave /one inversion of each of its chord types but the 12 string is useful & there is a killer drum set, as well as Washburn acoustic bass....
    I am very happy with the actual recorded sound of the Jacaranda guitar due to stereo voicing using Shure KSM32\'s...You will notice guys like Bela Fleck & the Flecktones using these mics \"Live\" for vocals ....and saxophone/oboe/bassoon....They work really well on difficult acoustic instruments.....
    Peace & a great 2002 year to all.
    John Thomas


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