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Topic: OT - Guitarists: I need a substitute for a Bm chord...

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  1. #1

    OT - Guitarists: I need a substitute for a Bm chord...

    Guitarists, I need help.

    I'm a horn player (the not truly French variety) by training and have only toyed around with guitar... until I started leading music at a church that doesn't have a full time pianist! Since leading worship services while playing the horn is awkward at best, I've decided to push myself into becoming at least a somewhat proficient guitarist.

    I am having great difficulty learning the Bm chord - well, all Barrre chords in general since I have somewhat small hands and haven't developed the hand strength/stretch to be able to hold the Barre chords securely.

    So I need a substitute for a Bm chord for a progression of G-D-G-D-G-Bm-G-A (Chorus of "Come Now Is the Time to Worship").

    I need it to be an easy to play chord that hopefully doesn't involve 7 fingers and a pinky toe to play.

    Any suggestions? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member rpearl's Avatar
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    Re: OT - Guitarists: I need a substitute for a Bm chord...

    Easy Bm chord is as follows:

    4 - open
    3 - 3rd finger, fourth fret
    2 - 2nd finger, third fret
    1 - first finger, second fret

    Don't use 5 and 6. Strings, not fingers...

    It's a Bm in first inversion - for what that is worth. If you can play a D, you can handle this!


    Good luck!
    Ron Pearl

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  3. #3

    Re: OT - Guitarists: I need a substitute for a Bm chord...

    Like in the example above, try not to use 6 string Barre chords unless you really need them.

    Bm
    *****finger

    - - - - - mute
    - - D - - 2
    - - - B - 4
    - - - F# 3
    - B - - - 1
    - - - - - mute

    Bosco Adama

  4. #4

    Re: OT - Guitarists: I need a substitute for a Bm chord...

    I say just really practice the barre chord and getting your fingers there, Really, if you want to play guitar, you won't be able to get past this, you just need to build up finger strength and recognition to get there. My young students have trouble with that, but after a bit of practice they get it good for that song. Its really not that hard once you get used to it

    other then that what rpearl said is a good way as well.
    www.energiestudios.com

  5. #5

    Re: OT - Guitarists: I need a substitute for a Bm chord...

    I know thew song...so why not just play another "D" chord instead? A "D" chord with a B in the bass is essentially a B minor 7. If you have someone on keys or on bass, have them play the B bass note. But a D chord would be a fine substitute by itself.

    But do learn to grab the barre chords, it's worth a little pain.

    Jim

  6. #6
    Senior Member rpearl's Avatar
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    Re: OT - Guitarists: I need a substitute for a Bm chord...

    I would also echo the sentiment of "learn those barre chords". But, you might ant to check the action/setup on your guitar - that is the height of the string to the fretboard. Cheap guitars (not making any assumptions about your instrument) often have the action so high that you could do chin-ups and still not get the string to the fret; if the action is too high, any barre chord will be exponentially more difficult. Might be worth checking with a guitar repair guy.
    Last edited by rpearl; 02-26-2007 at 08:33 PM. Reason: can neither spell not type, but can play the guitar...
    Ron Pearl

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    ronaldmpearl.com

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  7. #7

    Thumbs up Re: OT - Guitarists: I need a substitute for a Bm chord...

    Thanks for the recommendations, guys. The inversion or the D/B should get me through until I can learn the barre chords better, which I fully intend to do. But since I have 5 days until the next service and would rather not turn into Brian Adams circa summer of 1969 (playing until my fingers bleed, haha) I just need a quick fix for the next week or two (or however long it takes to get the barre chords down).

    The guitar is good - all of the men on my wife's side of the family are guitarists, banjoist, mandolinists, bassists... you name it one of them plays it. My wife's uncle even ran a guitar store/repair shop. My current guitar was given to me by my father in law, and since they all have G.A.S. it is a pretty nice one. Good sound, good action.

    I just have to learn to play the darn thing. Fifteeen plus years playing orchestral horn does not an overnight guitarist make.

    Plus I have that whole curse of being able to read music, which just completely gets in the way of rhythm charts and TAB, haha.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    Re: OT - Guitarists: I need a substitute for a Bm chord...

    When substituting chords, a vamping guitarist (or keyboard player) will generally look to any other which contains the same important colour note in this case the D note in Bminor. I would suggest experimenting with Gminor in third position where barring the first three strings is easy. A more interesting alternative in the first position without barre would be the diminished 7th chord, fingered on the fifth to second string using the notes B,F,Aflat,D, a very easy chord to play if you think it fits the tune.

  9. #9

    Re: OT - Guitarists: I need a substitute for a Bm chord...

    Maybe it was said in a different way already, if so I apologize.

    I typically form a regular 'D' chord and wrap my thumb around to cover the 2nd fret on string 5 (A) & 6 (E). Don't include string 6 (E) in your strum (although having your thumb there won't hurt if you accidentally do strum it).

    Rob

  10. #10

    Re: OT - Guitarists: I need a substitute for a Bm chord...

    Quote Originally Posted by robh
    I typically form a regular 'D' chord and wrap my thumb around to cover the 2nd fret on string 5 (A) & 6 (E). Don't include string 6 (E) in your strum (although having your thumb there won't hurt if you accidentally do strum it).
    As a guitarist, I feel I must comment on this. A lot of people use the "thumb wrap," and I won't try to talk people out of it who already use it. However, it is not recommended as general technique, as "proper" thumb placement has it flat against the back of the neck, a good half way down the width. The reason for this is that it helps with the curvature of the fingers, and thus with chord formation in general. It may help you get the b-minor at the moment, but it will impede your progress towards getting the barre chords learned; they are all but impossible without good thumb placement.
    - Jamie Kowalski

    All Hands Music - Kowalski on the web
    The Ear Is Always Correct - Writings on composition

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