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Topic: contemporary rhythm section charts

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  1. #1

    contemporary rhythm section charts

    Does anyone know of any resources for obtaining contemporary (pop/rock)studio charts (for drums, rhythm, bass/gtr./keys) for study purposes? I don't mean for the harmony, really, but rather to fully understand how certain things are indicated or written out (i.e. sometimes it is difficult to tell by listening if let's say something that the keyboardist/pianist does was prob. written out, or whether it was indicated in some way)-- also just the best ways to deal with the less common musical situations, etc.-- thanks
    Sam

  2. #2

    Re: contemporary rhythm section charts

    I'm not sure about finding "scores" to a lot of pop/rock music, as it's rarely written out.

    But you'll get the same type of information from a jazz / big band score. You can order them from jwpepper.com although the prices are a bit steep for simple study purposes.

    My advice is to give your local high school band director a call, ask if you can peruse the music library and borrow a few scores.

    You can also try these books:

    Inside the Score (by Rayburn Wright) -- full scores (with analysis) of a handful of big band charts
    Evanescence (by Maria Schneider) -- excellent big band composer who published the entire score to one of her albums

    Or any of the arranging books by russell garcia, don sebesky, sammy nestico, etc. These all have some good explanations of composing for a rhythm section. They're more jazz-based, but the concepts apply to most styles of music.

    chris.

  3. #3

    Re: contemporary rhythm section charts

    thanks for your reply, I guess i really am referring to "master rhythm" charts-- i am familiar with the basics, but i just want to know what the conventional methods are for making indications, like giving rhythm guitar a rhythm that is different than the bass (i.e. with small rhythmic figures above the bass clef staff, or should there be a sep. staff with gtr. rhythm indications), or what the conventions are for piano/organ indications,(and where do all these things go in this one chart?) so i think if i could just see a few real charts i would probably be able to find the answers to all my q.'s-- but these seem hard to find, all the books just have piano/vocals/gtr!
    Sam

  4. #4

    Re: contemporary rhythm section charts

    Quote Originally Posted by sammy24
    thanks for your reply, I guess i really am referring to "master rhythm" charts-- i am familiar with the basics, but i just want to know what the conventional methods are for making indications, like giving rhythm guitar a rhythm that is different than the bass (i.e. with small rhythmic figures above the bass clef staff, or should there be a sep. staff with gtr. rhythm indications), or what the conventions are for piano/organ indications,(and where do all these things go in this one chart?) so i think if i could just see a few real charts i would probably be able to find the answers to all my q.'s-- but these seem hard to find, all the books just have piano/vocals/gtr!
    In response to this, I can't say that I've ever seen any two master rhythm charts that looked the same. Everybody seems to do it differently. If you're in a large city, you might seek out a professional music copyist and he or she could probably go on for days about different ways of putting music on paper.

    What I usually see is a grand staff that contains the chord changes and all written figures and rhythms for kybd, bass, and guitar. Drum figures and instructions are written below the bass clef using x's for noteheads, or there might be a separate staff for drums.

    This is all highly dependent on the particular makeup of your rhythm section and the style of music. Country and standard jazz will have fewer specific instructions than say a rock song with specific riffs or a jazz fusion tune with three keyboards a/o guitar parts and intricate voicings. That's probably why I never see the same thing twice ;-)

    I guess the bottom line is to create whatever you need for your situation. As long as it's perfectly clear what each player is supposed to do, then you should be ok. Whatever you can't put on the chart can be quickly worked out in rehearsal with a brief explanation or demonstration of what you intend.
    Paul Baker
    Baker's Jazz And More
    Austin, Texas, USA
    www.bakersjazzandmore.com

  5. #5

    Re: contemporary rhythm section charts

    thanks, Paul, for your reply-- I was actually able to find yesterday a product from Mark Harrison which is a combination of his quintet on cd, along with charts for study, inc. rhythm and drums, and they have some samples available to view-- so i really saw what u were saying, as his charts looked different than the few i had previously seen-- but i liked some of his methods, and, as u said, clarity really seems to be the key-- I do wanna sound, though, like i know what i'm talking about, to some extent--

    i'm actually taking Dick Grove's wonderful arranging course right now, and his focus for the first two semesters (out of four) is on jazz-- so obviously i'm learning a ton, and i have found jazz to be an excellent source for training the ear, but as far as rhythm sections, it's definitely done differently than other styles-- i am sure eventually he will discuss other types of rhythm sections when he gets into other styles, but i definitely at this point want to get on the right track in terms of what a really good chart should look like
    Sam

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