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Topic: Help STUDIO Hardware

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  1. #1

    Help STUDIO Hardware

    hi,
    i'm working on a film project....it's a package deal...i will need to give to the director the score directly from my studio without going through the live orchestra recording (or just some live instruments) ...the problem is ..i have very good sample libraries..but my hardware is not so good ...my sound card is a Edirol Fa-66 (i need to change that too?)...and just that....can you please suggest some good hardware to have a great sound quality of my score??? i really don't know what i nead (mixers ecc) ...i hope you understand !! sorry for my english!

  2. #2

    Re: Help STUDIO Hardware

    If you only use samples and loops, you can render everything digitally. That means that your studio equipment won't affect the quality of your result.

    The main thing is to have good monitors and a reasonable sound card. (For recording you want a great soundcard as well as mics, preamps and a recording space.)

    Personally, I prefer a soundcard to at least have balanced outputs - such as the M-Audio Audiophile 192 or Echo MIA MIDI.

    More critical than the soundcard is the monitors and your listening space. Your choice of monitor depends upon your budget and personal preference. You could do a serach on "monitors" and read lots of threads on the subject.

  3. #3

    Re: Help STUDIO Hardware

    Quote Originally Posted by JonFairhurst
    If you only use samples and loops, you can render everything digitally. That means that your studio equipment won't affect the quality of your result.

    The main thing is to have good monitors and a reasonable sound card. (For recording you want a great soundcard as well as mics, preamps and a recording space.)

    Personally, I prefer a soundcard to at least have balanced outputs - such as the M-Audio Audiophile 192 or Echo MIA MIDI.

    More critical than the soundcard is the monitors and your listening space. Your choice of monitor depends upon your budget and personal preference. You could do a serach on "monitors" and read lots of threads on the subject.


    thanks...well i have Genelec Monitors...i think they are good, maybe dynaudio's are better ...but who cares .....btw yes i only use samples, no guitars to record live and other stuff....so you are telling me that with a good soundcard (no compressors, no mixers) my music can go to a movie or a pop singer? thanks again bye!

  4. #4

    Re: Help STUDIO Hardware

    Nothing wrong witn Genelecs.

    The other important things are...
    * A well treated room - you can't mix well if you have big peaks, valleys and reflections
    * Good software tools. There's lots available today.
    *Talent/experience - of course!
    * Contacts - People are as important as tools, talent and technology.

    All the best...

  5. #5

    Re: Help STUDIO Hardware

    Quote Originally Posted by JonFairhurst
    Nothing wrong witn Genelecs.

    The other important things are...
    * A well treated room - you can't mix well if you have big peaks, valleys and reflections
    * Good software tools. There's lots available today.
    *Talent/experience - of course!
    * Contacts - People are as important as tools, talent and technology.

    All the best...

    Thanks my friend!!

  6. #6

    Re: Help STUDIO Hardware

    just to echo the previous post, if you are working entirely within the computer (samples and software based synthesizers), then your music only touches the outside world at the monitors, so that's where you need to focus your attention!

    You did not mention which model from Genelec, but they are all pretty competent... which is to say, if you know how a given mix will translate to some other space then they will work for you. Monitors are as much of a personal choice as anything in music production!!!

    In my own world of prioriries, the room is the second most important check box - learning how the monitors and room "work" is the most important. I've worked in spaces that I thought could not possibly work, only to discover that the engineer knew how the space worked, and everything they did translated beautifully to other spaces!

    That said, I believe it is (a) easier to learn the monitor/space characteristics, and (b) easier to be consistent if you start with a good space and put good monitors in it!
    Bill Thompson
    Audio Enterprise
    KB3KJF

  7. #7

    Re: Help STUDIO Hardware

    Quote Originally Posted by wst3ae
    just to echo the previous post, if you are working entirely within the computer (samples and software based synthesizers), then your music only touches the outside world at the monitors, so that's where you need to focus your attention!

    You did not mention which model from Genelec, but they are all pretty competent... which is to say, if you know how a given mix will translate to some other space then they will work for you. Monitors are as much of a personal choice as anything in music production!!!

    In my own world of prioriries, the room is the second most important check box - learning how the monitors and room "work" is the most important. I've worked in spaces that I thought could not possibly work, only to discover that the engineer knew how the space worked, and everything they did translated beautifully to other spaces!

    That said, I believe it is (a) easier to learn the monitor/space characteristics, and (b) easier to be consistent if you start with a good space and put good monitors in it!
    Thanks very much for the help...the Genelec are the 8030's ...and my room ....i really don't know how to describe it!!! and i really don't know how a room should be to be good...but yes maybe listening to the same piece in my studio and in someone elses is a good thing to do for comparing

  8. #8

    Re: Help STUDIO Hardware

    Quote Originally Posted by aLfR3dd
    Thanks very much for the help...the Genelec are the 8030's ...and my room ....i really don't know how to describe it!!! and i really don't know how a room should be to be good...but yes maybe listening to the same piece in my studio and in someone elses is a good thing to do for comparing
    I've used the 8030's, and they will certainly do the job, once you learn them<G>!

    The room... depending on how serious you are, you might want to consider hiring an acoustician or studio designer to determine if there are any major challenges, and how to fix them.

    Without the dimensions and some other information no one can even make a wild guess as to what problems might lurk beneath, but let's assume there are one or two issues with low frequency behavior, and one or two minor early reflections. I'd expect that most designers could diagnose the problems, and offer solutions that fit your budget for in the vicinity of $1K(US). A more extensive design, or even a basic design for bigger problems will cost more, but most designers will be happy to provide the basic diagnosis and simple solutions for a reasonable fee.

    At the same time I'd probably ask the designer to take a look at some other fundamentals, power, grounding, and interconnections come to mind immediately. I would probably skip HVAC issues for the first pass as they can drive the cost up quickly!

    And there is always a chance that your room is already OK.

    If you let me know where you are located I might be able to point you in the direction of one or more designers that I know.

    Another alternative is to work with a remote designer. It can be done, and it can have excellent results, but don't force the issue. If a designer is not comfortable working remotely then it might cause problems!

    It isn't so much about seeing the space, drawings will tell you nearly everything you need to know if they are complete! There are occasional low frequency problems that can go undiagnosed without measurements, but more often than not fixing them is a budget buster<G>!

    My own preference is to work with local clients because I can make before and after measurements. You'd be surprised at how valuable that can be!!!

    As far as learning how your room translates to other spaces, well there's simply no more important exercise!!!

    Start by listening to some of your favorite albums in your studio. And by favorites, I mean albums you've listened to hundreds of times in dozens of places. You know the ones<G>!

    Then, try to get your mixes to have a character similar to those albums. You won't, and you shouldn't even try, get the exact same sound, that's not the point. Focus on the overall spectral balance, and then focus on the stereo image.

    When you have something that you thinks is well balanced take it else where and listen. If you listen to a lot of music in your car then listen to your music in your car. If there is a listening space that you frequent (dorm room, bed room, family room, whatever) listen to your work there.

    Lastly, listen to your work in one or two unfamiliar places, i.e. a friends house, a different car, be creative<G>!

    When you do these exercises you will want to listen to both your mix and the reference mix that you are trying to emulate. But mix up the order, sometimes audition your reference albums first, sometime listen to your stuff first. This will prevent your ears from jumping to conclusions!

    And that's really all there is to it<G>...
    Bill Thompson
    Audio Enterprise
    KB3KJF

  9. #9

    Re: Help STUDIO Hardware

    Quote Originally Posted by wst3ae
    I've used the 8030's, and they will certainly do the job, once you learn them<G>!

    The room... depending on how serious you are, you might want to consider hiring an acoustician or studio designer to determine if there are any major challenges, and how to fix them.

    Without the dimensions and some other information no one can even make a wild guess as to what problems might lurk beneath, but let's assume there are one or two issues with low frequency behavior, and one or two minor early reflections. I'd expect that most designers could diagnose the problems, and offer solutions that fit your budget for in the vicinity of $1K(US). A more extensive design, or even a basic design for bigger problems will cost more, but most designers will be happy to provide the basic diagnosis and simple solutions for a reasonable fee.

    At the same time I'd probably ask the designer to take a look at some other fundamentals, power, grounding, and interconnections come to mind immediately. I would probably skip HVAC issues for the first pass as they can drive the cost up quickly!

    And there is always a chance that your room is already OK.

    If you let me know where you are located I might be able to point you in the direction of one or more designers that I know.

    Another alternative is to work with a remote designer. It can be done, and it can have excellent results, but don't force the issue. If a designer is not comfortable working remotely then it might cause problems!

    It isn't so much about seeing the space, drawings will tell you nearly everything you need to know if they are complete! There are occasional low frequency problems that can go undiagnosed without measurements, but more often than not fixing them is a budget buster<G>!

    My own preference is to work with local clients because I can make before and after measurements. You'd be surprised at how valuable that can be!!!

    As far as learning how your room translates to other spaces, well there's simply no more important exercise!!!

    Start by listening to some of your favorite albums in your studio. And by favorites, I mean albums you've listened to hundreds of times in dozens of places. You know the ones<G>!

    Then, try to get your mixes to have a character similar to those albums. You won't, and you shouldn't even try, get the exact same sound, that's not the point. Focus on the overall spectral balance, and then focus on the stereo image.

    When you have something that you thinks is well balanced take it else where and listen. If you listen to a lot of music in your car then listen to your music in your car. If there is a listening space that you frequent (dorm room, bed room, family room, whatever) listen to your work there.

    Lastly, listen to your work in one or two unfamiliar places, i.e. a friends house, a different car, be creative<G>!

    When you do these exercises you will want to listen to both your mix and the reference mix that you are trying to emulate. But mix up the order, sometimes audition your reference albums first, sometime listen to your stuff first. This will prevent your ears from jumping to conclusions!

    And that's really all there is to it<G>...

    well...what more can i say......thank you so much!!!!!!!!! i will do everything you said me!!! Thanks Bye

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