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Topic: OT: Orchestral library workflow-tips for newbie

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  1. #1

    OT: Orchestral library workflow-tips for newbie

    I´m really not used to having such a big palette of orchestral sounds and samples as in Opus1. (K2 + Opus 1 + Cubase SL3)

    Can anyone give me some tips on how to use it? Maybe someone has been in the same situation.

    Do I sketch first, using simpler sounds and then I start using the different articulations?

    I´d like to "mix" as I compose, not leave all that for the postpro.

    Forgive a newbie these silly questions. I´m so overwhelmed by the choices, it´s difficult to begin discovering.

    /Johnny

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Re: OT: Orchestral library workflow-tips for newbie

    Your composition process should rule the day. In days past when a composer would sit down with a blank orchestral [paper] score, he had the equivalent of a HUGE modern day midi pallette. Every articulation of every instrument was at the tip of his quill or pencil. This fact should not be at the front of your mind but the back: so just write. I would suggest to compose an idea all the way through (say a passage for flute that contains numerous articulations) with a single patch and then go back and add key switches or other tracks containing the correct articulations. Only for the sake of not interupting the creative process with technical issues.

    These technical innovations are your servants at your disposal to write as freely and as accuratley as possible. The instant feedback is very helpful in fleshing out your ideas but should not lead to filling in measures since it's so easy to settle for something that works on a certain level. Remember all those great composers has erasures too.

  3. #3

    Re: OT: Orchestral library workflow-tips for newbie

    1) The best way to learn this is to start with a short score, say 32 bars, and only a few instruments. 5 min, 10 max.

    2) Now go through and look at each line to determine where your articulations are. Long, short, sustained, legato, staccato, etc.

    3) Now go and look at the instruments for your composition. You'll see in Opus 1 that they're broken down into long (.5), short (.3), sustain, legato (there's a legato without the legato mode), staccato, etc. Now look for the instruments with key switches. A key switch is a pink colored key that has an articulation under it usually starting on C0. Some keyswitches are already setup so that each of the main articulations are available within that program. So as you play, your left hand taps the appropriate key switch to access that articulation, while your right hand plays and phrases.

    4) On playback, by using the keyswitched articulations, and depending on your playing, you should hear a very realistic line.

    Vienna is consistent with its labeling approach. Once you learn the labeling, it applies to all the instruments.

    Don't worry about panning right now, just get this down first.

    Since you're on the Horizon series, you should see about using the Kontakt version of Vienna and downloading the K2 scripts that are available. The advantage of K2 is that the Performance Tool is totally eliminated. Everything is done within K2.

    For additional info, see the forums at www.vsl.co.at.
    Peter L. Alexander
    www.professionalorchestration.com
    www.alexanderpublishing.com
    Learn it right the first time.

  4. #4

    Re: OT: Orchestral library workflow-tips for newbie

    Very nice advice, peter and dpc. Thank you!

    I´m using the K2 version and have collected alot of scripts, for future use.

    I was thinking about what you have written about recording with a simple instrument, and add articulations later or to record keyswitching "live". Maybe they have their advantages in different situations?

    Actually I´ve been blessed a couple of times to compose for happy amateur orchestras, using a piano for inventing ideas and motifs, using the "non realtime" way of clicking notes in Sibelius, adding articulations later on, and modifying the score as the music evolves. It was an interresting way of composing. But I think it was rather boring at times. I wasnt as influenced and limited to my keyboard skills that way, which is a positive thing, but playing and recording a sequence in "live" has been the most stimulating and creative way IMHO.

    Another thing I`ve been thinking about: What do you and other people think about using banks instead of / together with keyswitches?

    /Johnny

  5. #5

    Re: OT: Orchestral library workflow-tips for newbie

    I like to use the instrument banks in Kontakt 2 this way I can load up an entire orchestra in one instance of K2. I assign each instrument abnk its own orchestra section then insert chosen articulations of each section into its own bank. Then I insert program changes where needed to swtich articulations.

    Each K2 instrument bank holds up to 128 articulations/instruments! Although theoretically that would mean you could load up to 16,385 articulations/instruments into one instance of Kontakt, your computer's RAM will run out way before that! In reality/practicality I use aprox 3 to 7 articulations per orchectra section on any given project.

    I love the advances madein audio composition tools/software!

  6. #6

    Re: OT: Orchestral library workflow-tips for newbie

    Quote Originally Posted by drjohnny79
    Another thing I`ve been thinking about: What do you and other people think about using banks instead of / together with keyswitches?

    /Johnny
    Personally I like keyswitches best because I feel it's easier to edit notes than program changes in Cubase. Other people might disagree. Btw. please note that the standard_all combination patches in Opus have reduced velocity layers (just one). If you want to use keyswitches while retaining full velocity layers I recommend that you check out my remapped Opus 1 instruments with consistent keyswitches (can't remember if I have referred you to this already).

    Nils

  7. #7

    Re: OT: Orchestral library workflow-tips for newbie

    Thank you for the link, haven't heard of it yet.

    Regards,
    Justus

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    Re: OT: Orchestral library workflow-tips for newbie

    Some very intersting ideas here. I like kstevege's approach especially.
    Good thread.

    Frank

  9. #9

    Re: OT: Orchestral library workflow-tips for newbie

    Quote Originally Posted by kstevege
    I like to use the instrument banks in Kontakt 2 this way I can load up an entire orchestra in one instance of K2. I assign each instrument abnk its own orchestra section then insert chosen articulations of each section into its own bank. Then I insert program changes where needed to swtich articulations.

    Each K2 instrument bank holds up to 128 articulations/instruments! Although theoretically that would mean you could load up to 16,385 articulations/instruments into one instance of Kontakt, your computer's RAM will run out way before that! In reality/practicality I use aprox 3 to 7 articulations per orchectra section on any given project.

    I love the advances madein audio composition tools/software!
    Can you load up a bank in K2 that has keyswitches?
    Peter L. Alexander
    www.professionalorchestration.com
    www.alexanderpublishing.com
    Learn it right the first time.

  10. #10

    Re: OT: Orchestral library workflow-tips for newbie

    Quote Originally Posted by peter269
    Can you load up a bank in K2 that has keyswitches?
    If you mean using keyswitches instead of program changes to switch between instruments in a bank then I think the answer is no, unless you set up some kind of MIDI transformation in your sequencer which transforms keyswitches into program changes.

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