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Topic: 4:3 Burn-in

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  1. #1

    Thumbs down 4:3 Burn-in

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    ***Advertisments***
    Of course this had to become noticeable while watching the football game in HD. I noticed a slight orange tint on the left and right side of my 57" screen. It is burn-in caused by the black bars (left and right) that appear when watching non HD content.

    Here is a link to more information:
    http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...hreadid=406182

    If you do not wish to "s t r e t c h" 4:3 content (looks bad IMO) gray bars are better then black. I was able to set my cable box to show grey bars.

    Be careful everyone. Burn-in sent my favorite toy on a 3 week trip to the repair center.

    Best,
    FB
    Bela D Media | www.BelaDMedia.com

  2. #2

    Re: 4:3 Burn-in

    I am guessing this is a plasma screen Francis? Plasma's are VERY suceptible to burn in. Network logos ("bugs") are also a concern on plasma screens. As are playing video games on them, etc...

    LCDs (flat panel and rear projection LCDs) are immune to the burn-in damage.
    Regards,
    Brian W. Ralston

    Check out my new FREE iPhone App! Click Here!

  3. #3

    Re: 4:3 Burn-in

    It's a rear projection. Here is my TV: http://www.tacp.toshiba.com/televisi...p?model=57HX83

    Could you imagine a 57" plasma? Gimme gimme!
    Bela D Media | www.BelaDMedia.com

  4. #4

    Re: 4:3 Burn-in

    Yeah...that's a CRT display...which is unfortunately also suceptible to burn in.

    CRT and Plasma of course have better contrast ratios than LCD varieties. (Although, the new LCD displays and even the Liquid Crystal on Silicone or LCoS systems are pretty closely matched any more). DLP is immune as well. It is just light reflecting off of mirrors.

    So yeah...the grey bars are about the best your one can do.
    Regards,
    Brian W. Ralston

    Check out my new FREE iPhone App! Click Here!

  5. #5

    Re: 4:3 Burn-in

    No burn-in with DLP?

    EDIT:
    Does DLP have burn in?
    DLP doesn’t have burn in - the sensation plaguing CRT-rear projection and Plasma televisions. Burn in is a stain on the screen by leaving a static or still image on the screen for a long period of time.


    It's a shame really. We spend a large sum for the TV and then all the non-HD channels cause damage. I better call Mom and warn her about the possibility of a QVC logo burn-in with her set
    Bela D Media | www.BelaDMedia.com

  6. #6

    Re: 4:3 Burn-in

    Second question: I would assume that the grey bars are safe but zooming full screen would be the best protection?
    Bela D Media | www.BelaDMedia.com

  7. #7

    Re: 4:3 Burn-in

    In my educated guess on that one...I would say yes...constantly moving material would probably be best. The grey bars are specifically chosen because their even, non-bright color will ensure an even burn-in on plasma or crt displays. But...that line between moving and non moving material is still stationary.

    If it were me...I would either stretch or zoom the non-HD material on those sets...even though the manufacturer says the grey bars should be enough. Does the set have a "wide stretch" mode or one that will create a variable gradation of stretch across the 16x9 display, thus making most everything look ok (except for the far most edges)? That is what I use on my Sony HD LCD projection. It actually looks....gulp...semi-ok. I have gotten use to it and really only notice it any more when the news or non-HD sports are on, with thier info tickers at the bottom getting distorted on the edges only as they scroll by.
    Regards,
    Brian W. Ralston

    Check out my new FREE iPhone App! Click Here!

  8. #8

    Re: 4:3 Burn-in

    The fun problem with DLP projectors or DLP rear projection sets is that some people see rainbows when watching them. Yes...because of the way the light is reflected off of thousands of tiny mirrors in a DLP projection setup...some people's eyes see a literal rainbow hovering in the air somewhere in front of the image of a DLP system. Projectors seem to be worse than the rear projection DLP sets.

    But...it is not a flaw in the DLP...rather just a sensitivity some people's retinas have to how they perceive reflected light. So...a few people see it with DLP...but most don't. So...if you ever think of getting a DLP projection system (or rear projection DLP display), you better ask if you can take it home and try it out for a few days first to see if you see the rainbows or not. Once you see them...you will probably always see them on those displays. And they will REALLY bug you so I am told. I don't see them.
    Those that do will of course usually have to return the sets for another HD display technology, usually settling on LCD or LCD rear projection. Which can suffer from the "screen door effect". But that is a whole other story.
    Regards,
    Brian W. Ralston

    Check out my new FREE iPhone App! Click Here!

  9. #9

    Re: 4:3 Burn-in

    Great post Brian and I appreciate your insight. Yes, I have 4 types of zoom. Theater 1,2, 3 and full. Some look better then others depending on content. News channels never looks right when zoomed. Too bad, since I am a MSNBC junky. LOL

    At least our local news is now broadcasting in HD.
    Bela D Media | www.BelaDMedia.com

  10. #10

    Re: 4:3 Burn-in

    Well, the rainbows on a DLP are caused by the color wheel displaying successive red-green-blue images, which is perceived as a full-color image. It's especially noticeable on fast moving high-contrast object on a black background, or if you move your eyes back and forth rapidly, where you can then see the colored strips painting the screen. It bothers some people, others don't even notice it.

    The more expensive DLP projectors have a faster color wheel (4x and faster) which reduces this effect. Also, the most expensive 3-chip DLP projectors don't have this problem, as it will have a dedicated chip to display all 3 colors (no color wheel).

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