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Topic: Prelude pour orchestre Nr. 1

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  1. #1

    Prelude pour orchestre Nr. 1

    Here is my newest work. I intend to write some of such pieces to make a little circle of orchestral preludes. This is the first one.

    R.

    http://rednosepress.de/MP3/Prelude%2...%20Nr.%201.mp3

  2. #2

    Re: Prelude pour orchestre Nr. 1

    Hi,

    there are some nice ideas in this piece. And a look to your website reveals that you are beginning to develop a musical language that came from other styles but is exploring a new world. BTW I am pleased to hear a salsa on your site!

    However I would consider the rendering of this work less convincing than your jazz pieces, at least at the moment. I hope this does not affend, but you asked for feedback there . An advice would be to listen very much to orchestral music, live and from CD to really "get into it".

    Also it would help to get even more distance from the piano/keyboard approach. Strings, winds and brass play much more in lines than in accords or appeggios, and that includes very much dynamical tension and detension, in the lines, in the phrases, even within the single notes.

    Maybe one of the better ideas to get into orchestra music would be to attend the rehearsals of a real orchestra. Hearing seperately what the middle voices play could open a new dimension to composing for orchestra.

    Just my 2c

    Hannes

  3. #3

    Re: Prelude pour orchestre Nr. 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Hannes_F
    Hi,

    there are some nice ideas in this piece. And a look to your website reveals that you are beginning to develop a musical language that came from other styles but is exploring a new world. BTW I am pleased to hear a salsa on your site!

    However I would consider the rendering of this work less convincing than your jazz pieces, at least at the moment. I hope this does not affend, but you asked for feedback there . An advice would be to listen very much to orchestral music, live and from CD to really "get into it".

    Also it would help to get even more distance from the piano/keyboard approach. Strings, winds and brass play much more in lines than in accords or appeggios, and that includes very much dynamical tension and detension, in the lines, in the phrases, even within the single notes.

    Maybe one of the better ideas to get into orchestra music would be to attend the rehearsals of a real orchestra. Hearing seperately what the middle voices play could open a new dimension to composing for orchestra.

    Just my 2c

    Hannes
    Are not afraid of your posting. I'm willing to learn (at least the musical language - or the possibilities of rendering sampled music). My point is: how to make sound my ideas realistic. You're right with the "piano/keyboard approach". I'm from there. And since I'm a newbie to the GPO, there is much to learn about this "instrument". Thank you for your comment. BTW, I'm not a Jazzplayer, just trying to organize music in different areas.

    Rudolf

  4. #4

    Re: Prelude pour orchestre Nr. 1

    Hannes' comments contain good advice, Rudolph -- and I, too,
    am a very strong proponent of reading and listening to every
    score of the Masters that you can possibly lay hands on.
    In the end, it is a only a shallow distillation of this that courses
    in theory and harmony and orchestration proffer -- so, to me, it
    makes more sense to simply go to the original source.

    There are, nonetheless, some fine ideas and definitely some
    moments of grace in this piece. Rudolph, good "instincts"
    are also a large part of composition and orchestration; and
    I would say you have them!

    May we look forward to much more from you; there is much
    promise in what I hear.

    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  5. #5

    Re: Prelude pour orchestre Nr. 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Locis
    My point is: how to make sound my ideas realistic.
    There is a little secret:

    Take a piece and let every note, and I mean every, be part of a crescendo or a decrescendo. For the excercise don't allow yourself any exception. With other words, if you go along a line, you should be able to to pick any note and tell whether it is louder or softer than it's neigbour context. And you should have an opinion why it is so (hint: phrasing and harmonic tension and detension). It will need time but will work wonders.

    Decide for every single note in the piece and do it. Then listen again and the sound will be far, far more realistic.

    Hannes

  6. #6

    Re: Prelude pour orchestre Nr. 1

    Yes! An excellent exercise!

  7. #7
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    Re: Prelude pour orchestre Nr. 1

    Rudolph,

    I think that Hannes and David have some good advice. I find that your prelude has some very interesting ideas and sounds to it. There is a certain organ-like quality to it that I find quite appealing. But, as an orchestra work it is at the same time very stiff, the phrases end abruptly, and I am unsure that the ending really give the piece the final resolution that it deserves. Some smoothing of phrases, blending from one to the next, more spatial feeling with a little reverb would help as well.

    Please continue to write and develop your techniques. There are good ideas and as you write more of the circle of prelude you will be surprised how the newer ones suprass the older ones in quality.

    Gary

    www.garybricault.com

  8. #8

    Re: Prelude pour orchestre Nr. 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Hannes_F
    There is a little secret:

    Take a piece and let every note, and I mean every, be part of a crescendo or a decrescendo. For the excercise don't allow yourself any exception. With other words, if you go along a line, you should be able to to pick any note and tell whether it is louder or softer than it's neigbour context. And you should have an opinion why it is so (hint: phrasing and harmonic tension and detension). It will need time but will work wonders.

    Decide for every single note in the piece and do it. Then listen again and the sound will be far, far more realistic.

    Hannes
    Thankyou for the good advice. This is really a point, that one never should forget. I tried to change the volumes at this piece, but rather than that I liked to finished the second one . And since school is started now in my area, I've less time for all my things. So, maybe in some future, You can hear a remixed version of the first prelude.

    Greetings

  9. #9

    Re: Prelude pour orchestre Nr. 1

    Quote Originally Posted by etLux
    Hannes' comments contain good advice, Rudolph -- and I, too,
    am a very strong proponent of reading and listening to every
    score of the Masters that you can possibly lay hands on.
    In the end, it is a only a shallow distillation of this that courses
    in theory and harmony and orchestration proffer -- so, to me, it
    makes more sense to simply go to the original source.

    There are, nonetheless, some fine ideas and definitely some
    moments of grace in this piece. Rudolph, good "instincts"
    are also a large part of composition and orchestration; and
    I would say you have them!

    May we look forward to much more from you; there is much
    promise in what I hear.

    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .
    I'm at your side, David. I like to study the pieces of the Masters, trying to understand, what it is, what builds a piece, which element of the music causes the connection of a phrase, a part of the form or the whole piece. Thankyou for listening and your kind words to me.

    My best whishes to you!

  10. #10

    Re: Prelude pour orchestre Nr. 1

    Quote Originally Posted by GaryBric
    Rudolph,

    I think that Hannes and David have some good advice. I find that your prelude has some very interesting ideas and sounds to it. There is a certain organ-like quality to it that I find quite appealing. But, as an orchestra work it is at the same time very stiff, the phrases end abruptly, and I am unsure that the ending really give the piece the final resolution that it deserves. Some smoothing of phrases, blending from one to the next, more spatial feeling with a little reverb would help as well.

    Please continue to write and develop your techniques. There are good ideas and as you write more of the circle of prelude you will be surprised how the newer ones suprass the older ones in quality.

    Gary

    www.garybricault.com
    I like the organ, too, Gary. For me the orchestra is like a big ship. You cant do any unprepared fast movements otherwise you'll sink down. May this makes this piece a little stiff. I try to prepare the movemnts of my ship better in future.

    May be everything good for you

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