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Topic: Benefits of Sound Forge...

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  1. #1

    Benefits of Sound Forge...

    I see that a lot of guys on here use Sound Forge quite a bit for editing. I was curious what specific features about it makes it so popular. I'm coming from a traditional music recording/engineering background and for me, Wavelab was always a cut above Sound Forge for my purposes. I'm not knocking it, just wanting to learn more about how this end of the business works and what features I should be looking for when getting into this...

  2. #2

    Re: Benefits of Sound Forge...

    I like Wavelab, though I feel it's more geared towards music editing, especially mastering with the multi-track editing etc. While it could be easily used to handle sfx, i feel far more comfortable with Sound Forge as a lot of the options I want, are easily accessible and flexible - with the batch converter being the operative example.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Burbank, CA. US of Mexico
    Posts
    651

    Re: Benefits of Sound Forge...

    For me, Sound Forge is great in its speedy workflow and stability. I've never crashed Sound Forge in 10 years. That says a lot.

    workflow example:

    I make a lot of variations in my sounds and then I export them out of protools in hi-res for my library. When i deliver, I open up the high res file in SF, do all of my down sampling and mastering, select the individual sounds and drag them to the desktop and do a "save all" to a directory for delivery.

    I just now tried to do that in Puke (sorry, I mean Peak) and it took 10x longer than it does in SF. You have to copy, make new sound file, then paste (3 functions instead of 1 motion). Then you have to save each one individually and Peak doesn't even remember the settings of the last saved file (which SF does), so you have to set all of the correct selection box for bit depth, dither settings, rename the file, etc. 10 moves to SF's 2. Peak just doesn't get it for speed, whereas SF crushes.

    I have no experience with Wavelab, so I can't speak to that, but for me the competition between SF and Puke is no competition at all.
    -Jamey

  4. #4

    Re: Benefits of Sound Forge...

    So what kinds of editing do sound design guys use in Sound Forge? Since there is no multi-track capability, how do you layer sounds? Or is that something that you leave up to your multi-track program and do other things in SF? These probably sound like very green questions, but I'm trying to get into this side of things and it is definitely a different perspective on things. Thanks for the replies...

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Burbank, CA. US of Mexico
    Posts
    651

    Re: Benefits of Sound Forge...

    you can mix tracks together by just option dragging the selected region onto another sound file, though it is definitely not a multitrack editor. If I have to do quick combinations, I'll do it in sound forge, but all of my real "designs" happen in protools.

    Essentially, I just use sound forge for single or dual track editorial, archival, and delivery prep stuff such as downsampling, optimizing, mastering, etc.
    -Jamey

  6. #6

    Re: Benefits of Sound Forge...

    I gotcha. So it seems like it's really more of a workflow/efficiency thing mostly. Jamey, I was poking around on your website and I have to say that your setup is really impressive. One thing I noticed in your FAQ section was about making a living in the game audio industry. It was a little disheartening to read that you think pretty much only people with no bills who live with their parents can survive doing it. I'm interesting in getting into the composing/sound design end of games with the idea of making extra money to augment an existing day job. I was wondering what your thoughts about that were. Do you think that someone who works a full time day job will have the time available to do this job competently? Do most people work with smaller developers? Thanks for your responses so far...

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Burbank, CA. US of Mexico
    Posts
    651

    Re: Benefits of Sound Forge...

    You're welcome to email me privately if you want to talk.
    -Jamey

    btw- you misinterpreted what I said.... I was talking about getting started as a composer....and I was being tounge-in-cheek.

  8. #8

    Re: Benefits of Sound Forge...

    When it comes to layering sounds I use Nuendo. Not just because SF doesn't multi-track but because in Nuendo almost every parameter of any effect can be automated, giving you complete control of every aspect of a sound at every moment. I have found myself doing more and more in Nuendo and less and less in SF.

    With that said, I don't think it's possible to do any heavy production work without SF. It is the greatest editing tool there is. The only problem I ever had was using the batch processor on large amounts of files. Somewhere between 400-600 files and it it would run through them but not do anything (we eventually figured out that it had to do with character limits. If you selected all the files in a directory and dragged them into SF it would work fine, but if you went through the "add files" dialogue there was a limit as to how many files you could process at one time before breaking it). After Jamey said SF never crashed in 10 years I thought back and I can't remember it ever crashing on me either and that really is saying quite a lot.

    Anyway, as far as making sound design a career, I advise doing so. The money is good, the job is fun and after collecting contact after contact, eventually other opportunities come your way (like music gigs and start-up game companies where you have a vested interest).

    Just one guys opinion
    Michael Peter

    If music be the food of love...
    play on

    William Shakespeare

    homepage

  9. #9

    Re: Benefits of Sound Forge...

    I've always liked Nuendo in the past. Pro Tools has primarily been my main platform, but the cost of an HD system is too much to handle at the moment. LE doesn't have surround outputs, SMPTE timeline or (depending on the material) enough available audio tracks. I'm looking at using a Nuendo/Apogee combo for the system I want to put together for sound design and game audio. I just ordered a dual 3.0ghz Mac Pro a couple days ago, but I'm going to have to run XP on it for the time being until Nuendo and Native Instruments have Intel compatibility. I'm in the really fortunate position of working for a dealer of all of those components, so my overhead for starting this venture is actually quite low. I really appreciate how helpful and informative this forum is. I've been reading "The Complete Guide to Game Audio" and that has helped out a lot, but I've still felt unsure of just how successful I might be at this...

  10. #10

    Re: Benefits of Sound Forge...

    As pointed out above, Sound Forge is a rock. A very very useful tool.
    Doyle W. Donehoo, Composer
    Radar Music
    www.doylewdonehoo.com

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