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Topic: Sound Editor of choice....

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  1. #1
    Power Profile User lukpcn's Avatar
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    Question Which Sound Editor to choose....

    Hi,
    a friend of mine want to buy a sound editor...
    His choices are:
    1) Adobe Audition
    2) Sound Forge
    3) Wavelab

    I told him to get Audition because it's nice and have trumendous Noise Reduction thing built-in...., but on the other hand all studios around the world use Wavelab or Sound Forge...
    I don't know any of them too much.... Sound Forge a bit but it has no sound reduction built in I guess...
    I can't find any Wavelab 6 demo around so I don't know if it has it or not...

    Any1 of You can say more about the noise reduction things/plugins in Wavelab or Sound Forge ???

    Should my friend go for Adobe Audition or for Sound Forge/ Wavelab + additional noise reduction program.... and if yes then which one ?

  2. #2

    Re: Sound Editor of choice....

    I know Mac owners who have bought PC's just to have Wavelab.

  3. #3

    Re: Sound Editor of choice....

    Wavelab hands down...

  4. #4
    Power Profile User lukpcn's Avatar
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    Re: Sound Editor of choice....

    but does wavelab have some noise reduction which is essential in working with recordings??

  5. #5

    Re: Sound Editor of choice....

    Quote Originally Posted by lukpcn
    but does wavelab have some noise reduction which is essential in working with recordings??
    Wavelab is perhaps less of a deal if NR is your main concern. Check out this comparison including Sound Forge and Audition:
    http://www.eqmag.com/story.asp?storyCode=11006

  6. #6

    Re: Sound Editor of choice....

    There are a lot of choices for a sound editor, I use Sound Forge 6, Wavelab 5, Audition 1.5, and Samplewrench 5.

    Each has it's strengths and each has it's weaknesses. The final choice depends a lot on what you plan to do with the tool, and what other tools you have in your arsenal.

    Sound Forge is, by far, the fastest, easiest user interface. They do have a very capable CD authoring tool (CD Architect) and my favorite batch processing tool, and their convolution reverb is wonderful, if a little tricky to learn.

    Part of the reason I am so comfortable with SF is probably because it was the first audio editor I bought when I got a PC for the studio. Thus I've been using it for a long time, and I am used to it.

    Wavelab has CD authoring built in, but it isn't quite as flexible/capable as CD Architect, at least for me. They also have their Montage view, which I find just so very useful for a lot of projects that don't require a lot of really detailed editing (which is most really!) You can also use the Montage view as a multi-track recorder/player, something Sound Forge is still lacking (though they offer that capability in both Acid and Vegas.) Support for newer CD writers is weak however, and that can be a major sticking point!

    The other major advantage that Wavelab used to enjoy was the ability to audition and manage plugins on the fly. That capability has finally been added to Sound Forge though.

    Audition is probably the best multitrack tool of the bunch. It also sports a fairly sensible user interface, but it is so different from the others that switching back and forth is not a lot of fun. I've read, but not witnessed, that integration with Primier is well done, so if you do a lot of audio post work for folks that use Primier that might be an important point.

    Samplewrench is the lightweight of the bunch, but I say that with great respect and admiriation. It is the best tool for sample looping and editing too.

    I should also mention Audacity, which is free! It works quite well, but I find the user interface to be just enough of a learning curve that I haven't spent much time with it.

    Then there is Sonar. Sonar provides a non-destructive audio editing feature that is very similar to Wavelab's Montage, and it provides an extremely capable multi-track audio recording system that also happens to support MIDI. There is no facility for detailed audio editing, which I think is a shame, but they provide a rock solid interface to any audio editor of your choice.

    Since I use Sonar I am on the verge of dumping, or at the very least no longer upgrading Wavelab and Audition!

    I've just reached the point where I am tired of constantly paying for upgrades for all these tools. Absent that I'd probably keep all of them.

    I should also mention that Wavelab has gone from an annoying copy protection scheme (insert the CD every once in a while) to an intrusive scheme (dongle!) That was the thing that got me looking at reducing my toolset.

    There is no perfect tool, so examine your requirements and your other tools to help you make a choice! When pressed, I generally suggest Sound Forge. I'm not thrilled with some of their policies (I've been burnt by buying tools that are later given away twice now, part of the reason I am still at version 6!) But their support has always been first rate, and Sony did not mess with that, and the tools just work, and they work the way I expect them to.

    I'd also suggest getting a copy of Samplewrench if you do any sample editing, or if you need to remove the occasional click or pop. It is soooooo fast!

    Hope this helps rather than muddies the water...

    Bill

  7. #7

    Re: Sound Editor of choice....

    There is the low cost alternative of Gold Wave. It is a "budget" audio editor and clunky, but has been around for ages. Very stable and functional, but it is not a professional level tool.

    I just thought I would mention it in addendum to the list. Maybe other posters might be interested in checking it out.

  8. #8

    Re: Sound Editor of choice....

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaspo
    There is the low cost alternative of Gold Wave. It is a "budget" audio editor and clunky, but has been around for ages. Very stable and functional, but it is not a professional level tool.

    I just thought I would mention it in addendum to the list. Maybe other posters might be interested in checking it out.
    How is something both clunky and stable? I have Goldwave and I do agree it is stable. I've never had it crash. For the price you can't go wrong. The developer continues to make improvements and the updates and upgrades are always free. It now has plugin support as well.

  9. #9

    Re: Sound Editor of choice....

    Sorry, I meant the interface is clunky and has old fashioned Win98 Controls.

  10. #10

    Re: Which Sound Editor to choose....

    Quote Originally Posted by lukpcn
    Hi,
    a friend of mine want to buy a sound editor...
    His choices are:
    1) Adobe Audition
    2) Sound Forge
    3) Wavelab

    I told him to get Audition because it's nice and have trumendous Noise Reduction thing built-in...., but on the other hand all studios around the world use Wavelab or Sound Forge...
    I don't know any of them too much.... Sound Forge a bit but it has no sound reduction built in I guess...
    I can't find any Wavelab 6 demo around so I don't know if it has it or not...

    Any1 of You can say more about the noise reduction things/plugins in Wavelab or Sound Forge ???

    Should my friend go for Adobe Audition or for Sound Forge/ Wavelab + additional noise reduction program.... and if yes then which one ?

    Years ago, when I started editing waves I tested WavceLab & Cool Edit Pro.
    I decided to use Cool Edit Pro, which was bought by Adobe and is now Adobe Audtition 2.0.
    I'm very happy with this editor, very handy & the most stabile program I have ever used.

    :-) Jovan
    the man with the blue guitar

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