• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Topic: Dvorak: the Golden Age of the Internet, enjoy it while you can

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Orcas Island
    Posts
    11,454

    Dvorak: the Golden Age of the Internet, enjoy it while you can

    PC Magazine John Dvorak writes:
    "How many people realize that we're living in a golden age, the Golden Age of the Internet? It won't last; golden ages never do. Some of it will remain, but there's evidence that much of it is headed for the trash heap of history...

    Radio days. The golden age of radio lasted from about 1930 to 1950. It was nothing like radio today...

    A proprietary, closed Net is coming. A golden age ends either when something new comes along (as with radio's golden age, killed by the advent of TV), the government gets involved, or entropy sets in—usually a mix of these elements. In the case of the Internet, we are already seeing a combination of government, carrier, and business interactions that will eventually turn the Net into a restricted and somewhat proprietary network...

    It's already a crime to post intellectual discussions about copy-protection schemes that are protected by the DMCA. If the American public tolerates that sort of onerous restriction, then it will tolerate anything.

    Filtering and blacklists now common. Most U.S. government agencies now use filtering mechanisms to keep their own computers from accessing blacklisted Web sites...

    Blame spam and porn. Spam, porn, and other forms of questionable content are the reasons for filtering and blacklisting...~~~~ memorabilia sales and hate sites are also banned....

    Is there anything the public can do about this? Yes—enjoy the Golden Age, while you can""
    Interesting read and interestingpoints raise. Seems like the Golden Age is ending sooner than expected. What do you think?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    464

    Re: Dvorak: the Golden Age of the Internet, enjoy it while you can

    i've read a lot about phasing out our current internet and bringing in the Internet 2, currently in the works, which will be government regulated - and only sites approved by the government will be allowed in cyberspace; you will also enjoy all the new taxes that will go along with it

  3. #3
    Senior Member Leaf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,797

    Re: Dvorak: the Golden Age of the Internet, enjoy it while you can

    I read some doc which i think was the DMCA, and it had a list of exemptions which to me seemed it would be a difficult hurdle to prosecute for intellectual discussion aside from it's trampling of freespeech. It also seems problematic that the exemption states it is for educational institutions. I don't see how the use for educational purposes can be limited to educational institutions, don't we have a right to self-educate since we are supposed to be a free country, not a communist dictatorship.

  4. #4
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    California Redwoods
    Posts
    2,932

    Re: Dvorak: the Golden Age of the Internet, enjoy it while you can

    Quote Originally Posted by Garritan
    Interesting read and interestingpoints raise. Seems like the Golden Age is ending sooner than expected. What do you think?


    Well, I think the economic impact must be considered. Severe restrictions will cause many people to not use the internet, reducing sales of much software and equipment, and internet shopping in general will decline as people decline to use the net. This will generate more petroleum usage as people try to buy in stores what they now buy on line. It will place a bigger burden on the postal system as people give up email because of snooping and restrictions like SBC's new dictatorial terms of service. The economic impact is a serious consideration, and I don't think there has been much discussion of it.

    The constitutional issues involved are indeed serious, and will be debated. But in the end, I suspect that the economic impact will be the deciding factor.

    Richard

  5. #5

    Re: Dvorak: the Golden Age of the Internet, enjoy it while you can

    Well, the "one bad apple spoils the whole bunch" is more applicable to the web than to the printing press, radio or TV. When printing presses came out, it cost money to own and operate them, money that us peasants rarely had. Even more so with radio and TV, which also require government liscening. Enter the web...

    The web has turned the journalistic world on its ear since it gives mere mortals the ability to immediately reach a world wide audience. This is an egalitarian scenario that would have made the French Revolution proud.
    However, when you allow anyone, and I do mean anyone, to step up to the microphone, you expose human nature at its most predictable. In every country and culture, a certain amount of people are, simply put, jerks.

    When people who do and say bad things expose themselves to the general population, censorship is the historical knee jerk reaction. The same is true of terrorism and privacy. However, you can't have an egalitarian society (i.e. the web) on the one hand, and "protect" people on the other. Censorship, invasion of privacy and other restrictions are the inevitable result. The only way to avoid this is if everyone behaved themselves. You can't get the population of a single city to do that. It certainly isn't going to happen globally. And so, a few bad apples will screw it up for the rest of us. Welcome to Earth. We hope you enjoy your time here with the human race.

    The other driving factor towards a more restricted web will be matters of wealth, power and control, i.e. the interests of business and government. Companies exist to turn a profit and will seek any and all advantages. And as for government, how well do you think all that egalitarian stuff will truly play in the smoke filled cloakrooms where those who have and seek political power reside?

    Dvorak has it right. So what to do? Enjoy the moment, and also anticipate the future so that you can prepare yourself to exist in that reality in the best manner possible.
    Christopher Duncan
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Author of
    Unite the Tribes and The Career Programmer
    www.PracticalUSA.com


  6. #6
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    California Redwoods
    Posts
    2,932

    Re: Dvorak: the Golden Age of the Internet, enjoy it while you can

    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Duncan
    Well, the "one bad apple spoils the whole bunch" is more applicable to the web than to the printing press, radio or TV. When printing presses came out, it cost money to own and operate them, money that us peasants rarely had. Even more so with radio and TV, which also require government liscening. Enter the web...

    The web has turned the journalistic world on its ear since it gives mere mortals the ability to immediately reach a world wide audience. This is an egalitarian scenario that would have made the French Revolution proud.
    However, when you allow anyone, and I do mean anyone, to step up to the microphone, you expose human nature at its most predictable. In every country and culture, a certain amount of people are, simply put, jerks.

    When people who do and say bad things expose themselves to the general population, censorship is the historical knee jerk reaction. The same is true of terrorism and privacy. However, you can't have an egalitarian society (i.e. the web) on the one hand, and "protect" people on the other. Censorship, invasion of privacy and other restrictions are the inevitable result. The only way to avoid this is if everyone behaved themselves. You can't get the population of a single city to do that. It certainly isn't going to happen globally. And so, a few bad apples will screw it up for the rest of us. Welcome to Earth. We hope you enjoy your time here with the human race.

    The other driving factor towards a more restricted web will be matters of wealth, power and control, i.e. the interests of business and government. Companies exist to turn a profit and will seek any and all advantages. And as for government, how well do you think all that egalitarian stuff will truly play in the smoke filled cloakrooms where those who have and seek political power reside?

    Dvorak has it right. So what to do? Enjoy the moment, and also anticipate the future so that you can prepare yourself to exist in that reality in the best manner possible.
    Well, some of us idealistic radicals have hopes of someday discovering a government "of the PEOPLE, by the PEOPLE and for the PEOPLE". But it seems that the first step must be an overhaul of the forces driving humanity, primarily greed and lust for power.

    But end of rant for me, before I get carried away.

    Richard

  7. #7

    Re: Dvorak: the Golden Age of the Internet, enjoy it while you can

    sorry folks...the government will never be able to squash the free-speech machine known as the internet. Even if they do come out with this so called Internet2 you speak of...there are millions of motivated people out there that will simply just go around it and create Internet1b...and there is really no way for the government to squash it without severe violations of the constitution.

    I know everyone is sick of the spam..me included... but that's how it is. The reduction in spam can and will only come from economically motivated factors. If someone comes out with Internet2 and people think its a better $$ deal than Internet1, they may switch(providing they can still get to all the websites, forums, chat rooms, etc that are important to them). Or if one provider is able to eliminate spam entirely, then people will flock to that provider, etc.. Or perhaps they may be able to sell a porn-free internet. Again, it will only work if they are able to get to everything else they want to get too. Americans will never tolerate much censorship, especially if most other countries are still speaking freely on internet1.

    The governement will never be able to get away with censorship in this case. They got away with it in the FCC for years due to a number of factors, not the least of which is that our country used to be controlled by the so called "moral majority", but these days..the ACLU and other more liberal organizations seem to have a lot more control over the changes taking place (that is not neccessily a good thing, but that's how it is). Also, with the case of the FCC, they were regulating radio waves in open airspace...somewhere along the line it made sense to have regulation...perhaps more for practical reasons than moral ones. At least it could be sold that way, even if moral prejudices were enforced along the way.
    "Music is a manifestation of the human spirit similar to a language. If we do not want such things to remain dead treasures, we must do our utmost to make the greatest number of people understand their secrets" -- Zoltan Kodaly

  8. #8

    Re: Dvorak: the Golden Age of the Internet, enjoy it while you can

    Quote Originally Posted by rwayland
    Well, some of us idealistic radicals have hopes of someday discovering a government "of the PEOPLE, by the PEOPLE and for the PEOPLE".
    Actually, that's exactly what we have. The problem is that people think political activism is what changes things (i.e. vote red or vote blue or vote purple, etc.). Anyone who really wants to influence what elected officials do at local, state and federal levels is fighting the wrong fight.

    Once people are elected to office, they're free to do whatever they please (assuming it's legal), even going 180 degrees on every campaign promise they made. However, the one thing that all politicians have in common is the desire to keep their jobs. Therefore, the way to exert influence on the government lies not in who you get elected, but in keeping them in line once they take office.

    How does one do this? Easy. Simply change the tone of the nation. Turn popular opinion in the direction that you'd like the country to go, and get people excited about it. Politicians will avoid like the plague any stance that they think is election suicide, and when the majority of the nation shifts in one direction or the other, the politicians will follow. Congressmen have to run for reelection every two years. The president every 4 years. In other words, they're thinking about reelection the moment they hit office.

    People seem to think that politics shapes society. In fact, through the professional politician's fear of job loss, it's society that shapes politics. If you can't change the tone of the nation, then perhaps your feelings don't represent the majority. If you strike a spark on dry grass, it will burn. And the politicians will shift quickly to avoid getting their toes singed.

    The civil rights movement, the Viet Nam war, there are many examples where politicians dragged their feet until public opinion became so focused and vocal that any politician worth his three piece suit knew that the only way to get reelected was to go along with the people.

    And that's how you handle a democratic republic.
    Christopher Duncan
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Author of
    Unite the Tribes and The Career Programmer
    www.PracticalUSA.com


  9. #9

    Re: Dvorak: the Golden Age of the Internet, enjoy it while you can

    Dvorak is at best a troll and worst totally off his rocker. Just about every one of these grandiose predictions he makes fails to come true. He's the Ann Coulter of tech journalism.

    So yeah, I wouldn't put too much stock in his predictions for this crazy thing we call the intarnets.

  10. #10

    Re: Dvorak: the Golden Age of the Internet, enjoy it while you can

    Ya gotta admire Dvorak. He's predicted more doomsdays
    than Nostradamus. And he still has his job.

    He has his points, though. For reasons both political and
    financial, various powers-that-be do seem to be taking a
    serious shot at Balkanizing the internet.

    I wonder, however, if, at this point -- with the internet
    so deeply embedded and widely decentralized -- it is
    even technically possible to do such a thing. Even China
    is having rather mixed success at it.

    The economic consequences would also likely be quite
    devastating. Millions of businesses, small and large, are
    now substantially dependent upon the internet. Striating
    the net might well crash a number of economies, including
    especially our own.

    Greed can be astounding near-sighted, though. It would
    not be the first case of a golden goose meeting the axe.

    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •