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Topic: Klaus Schulze -- "Collection 1"

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  1. #1

    Klaus Schulze -- "Collection 1"

    Does anyone else here own this collection?

    I bought it some time ago, anticipating my eventual foray into the wonderful world of sample-based music.

    It is laid out in an extremely bizarre (to me, at least) fashion: Large .wav files, each containing anything from 3 to 20+ sounds played one after the other. It's a fairly old library (ca. 1991), so maybe the hardware available then handled these files differently than, say, GS3 does today.....???

    I'm trying to figure out the best way to use this library, and I'm not sure whether there's any way to make proper use of it other than (i) splitting each .wav file up into its constituent parts, (ii) saving each of the constituent parts as smaller .wav files, (iii) possibly transposing individual notes (how?) to fill in the missing notes between the samples provided, and finally (iv) combining related .wav files into .gig files.

    Any suggestions on other ways to handle this library?

    Great big thanks,

    Alan

  2. #2

    Re: Klaus Schulze -- "Collection 1"

    ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


  3. #3

    Re: Klaus Schulze -- "Collection 1"

    If you use Logic, there's an easy to load a .wav file, strip the silence and save each audio section as a seperate .wav file. It can done in less than a minute. For mapping, I don't know what format you want to use the sample in. : )

  4. #4

    Re: Klaus Schulze -- "Collection 1"

    If it makes you feel better, I went through that process with the Propellerhead Island Giant Gongs CD. I loaded the samples into Peak, cut out the announcements, split the different hits and saved them as individual files. Then I started Mach Five and assigned the samples to different keys. I seem to remember it taking about an hour (it was the first time I had ever done anything like that), but once I did it, it was easy to just load up my "gong kit" and play...

  5. #5

    Re: Klaus Schulze -- "Collection 1"

    Hey Doug, nice site. LOTS of info!

  6. #6

    Re: Klaus Schulze -- "Collection 1"

    Quote Originally Posted by dinerdog
    If you use Logic, there's an easy to load a .wav file, strip the silence and save each audio section as a seperate .wav file. It can done in less than a minute. For mapping, I don't know what format you want to use the sample in. : )
    Very interesting -- I use Cubase SX3... I wonder whether there's a comparable function there...

    Is there a Logic-specific "name" or "command" for the process that you described? That would give me something specific to look for, unless another Cubase user chimes in here.

    For mapping, I plan to build .gig files out of the constituent .wav files. I've done it before with other collections ("Doru Malaia - 230 Ethnic Drums and Percussions," etc.), but this is the first time that I've seen a sample library that was set up this way, where I'd have to first break up .wav files into smaller ones...

  7. #7

    Re: Klaus Schulze -- "Collection 1"

    Yes, it's called "strip silence". You can click on the piece of audio, select "strip silence" and your just left with all the music bits. The default is usualy dead-on, but you can also change the threshold, min time accepted as silence etc. and SEE IT visualy until you get what you want. Then click ok and it's done. If it's on your arrange page only the music bits are left. On your audio page are all the seperate files with the sample name and ascending numeric extensions. MusicFx.01, MusicFX.02 etc. You can then grab the samples and save to whatever format you want: .wav, aif, mp3, AAC etc. It's quite simple but soooooo useful.

  8. #8

    Re: Klaus Schulze -- "Collection 1"

    Quote Originally Posted by dinerdog
    Hey Doug, nice site. LOTS of info!
    Thanks... I'm getting older so I started it just to keep track of products that I bought. Then it turned into a list of products I wanted, and now, it's turned into something even bigger than that...

  9. #9

    Re: Klaus Schulze -- "Collection 1"

    To Doug Wellington

    I went to have a look on your site you say :

    SoundsOnline forums This is where you'll find the East West and Quantum Leap stuff. They used to have a forum at Northern Sounds, but for whatever reason decided to start their own. Of course, this lead to some difficulties and maybe even some animosity. As far as I know, the East West people are not allowed to post at Northern Sounds, so they can't "defend" themselves there. Because of that, you may see some negativity towards East West and Quantum Leap on the forums at Northern Sounds. Try to ignore that and look at the good stuff over there.
    East West is systematically banning all people having problems and is not saying all the truth about there products, that is why that there is "some negativity towards East West and Quantum Leap on the forums at Northern Sounds. "

    and that is why I have created a "free" QLSO forum at : http://groups.yahoo.com/group/qlso

  10. #10

    Re: Klaus Schulze -- "Collection 1"

    Quote Originally Posted by dinerdog
    Yes, it's called "strip silence". You can click on the piece of audio, select "strip silence" and your just left with all the music bits.
    First Google hit, and look what I found:
    Quote Originally Posted by soundonsound
    http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jun03/articles/qa0603.asp

    Q How can I extract loops from audio sample CDs? Most of my sample CDs are audio format and have several loops on each track. Is there an easy way to break those tracks up into individual loops, or do I have to carve each one out in my sample editor.

    Barry Taylor

    SOS contributor Len Sasso replies: You're undoubtedly going to have to do some fine-tuning in a sample editor to get precise loops, but you can significantly speed up the process if you have software that will detect the silent portions of an audio file and strip them out, leaving the remaining portions as individual regions. Digital audio sequencers such as Logic (Strip Silence) and Cubase (Detect Silence) have this feature, for example. Although not quite as convenient, you can also use beat-slicing software such as Recycle to extract the loops.

    Silence detection works by searching for areas in an audio file where the level drops below a given threshold for a specified minimum amount of time. The threshold and minimum time are the critical settings. They ensure that you get whole loops rather than breaking a single loop into several slices (over-slicing) or capturing several loops in the same slice (under-slicing). Most sample CDs separate each loop by the same amount of time, typically around half a second. Measuring the space between a pair of loops and using that for the minimum-time setting will usually prevent over-slicing. If you don't get enough slices, reduce the minimum time in small increments. Usually the space between loops is true silence, so the threshold can be set as low as possible to prevent under-slicing. If you don't get enough slices, increase the threshold in small increments. If your slice detection software allows for pre-roll and post-roll settings, set both to zero.

    Once you have the CD track sliced into individual regions, you will most likely need to adjust their end points manually in a sample editor. Being played by humans, the loop tempos may not be exactly as indicated. You can often get away with shortening or lengthening the region by a few milliseconds to exactly match the target tempo. Loops (especially percussion) often contain a pickup at the beginning or tag at the end to make them work well as single shots at the beginning or end of a phrase. In that case you will need to adjust the endpoints to extract the 'loop within the loop'.

    Finally, depending on the software you're using, the silence detection function may only produce regions within the audio file, rather than separate audio files. That's all you'll need if you're going to use the loops in the same host, but if you want to use them separately, you'll need to export the individual regions. Most digital audio sequencers and loop slicing packages offer a batch export function for that purpose.
    I can see that pages 380-382 of the Cubase Operation Manual address the "Detect Silence" function.

    I will play with this, and see whether/how well it works. At least now (I think) I know what to look for. Thanks for the analogy!!

    -- alan

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