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Topic: Discs for larger sample libraries

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  1. #1

    Discs for larger sample libraries

    Remeber when developers were asking people here whether they should stop shipping libraries on stacks of CD and start shipping their libs on single DVDs? Now, many of the libs have grown into stacks of DVDs.

    TDK has now announced that they are ready to ship single-layer Blu-ray recordable discs to the US with 25GB capacity. Eventually, they will sell dual layer 50 GB discs. One can assume that TDK will start selling Blu-ray drives in the US market soon. (Sure, the discs are twenty bucks a pop right now, but that won't last long.)

    http://www.tgdaily.com/2006/04/10/td...blu-ray_media/

    So, how long before big sample libs are stamped on Blu-ray (or HD DVD) discs? Two years? Three? If it's as long as four, I'll be surprised.

    700 MB CDs seem so quaint now...

    -JF

  2. #2

    Re: Discs for larger sample libraries

    Quote Originally Posted by JonFairhurst
    So, how long before big sample libs are stamped on Blu-ray (or HD DVD) discs? Two years? Three?
    In three years, librarys will be shipped on Firewire 1600 HDs.
    Ready installed with software and samples, registered, authorized, only for that harddisc. - plug and play.

    At the moment the price for harddiscs is about 1$/GB thats even cheaper than blue ray.

    Chris Hein
    Chris Hein - Horns / Chris Hein - Guitars / Chris Hein - Bass
    http://www.chrishein.net

  3. #3
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    Re: Discs for larger sample libraries

    Well, we're already set to ship on Blu-ray and hd now, so I'm sure sample library makers can get up to speed pretty quick.

    The logistical problem at the moment is that ...the players and rom readers are already here (sitting in lots of LA warehouses) and they'll hit the stores starting in four or five weeks or so. Of course they were supposed to be released two weeks ago and everybody pushed the reader dates back. So, that might go on for a few weeks longer.

    BUT...

    the actual burners and authoring apps aren't scheduled for firm releases yet because they were all delayed ...because it wasn't until three months ago (January) that the interim deal for copy protection was signed off on. So we're being told we're not getting the first batch of Pioneer blu-ray burners for another 6-8 weeks or longer. Panasonic and others here in LA are churning out the 25gb and 50gb blanks day and night, so I don't think there will be a blank media supply problem. From what I'm told, the Pioneer, Sony, and Panasonic burners are flowing into warehouses and just sitting.

    My gut feeling is that we'll have a nice flood of media/burners/readers/and media by September 1 in time for the holidays. Which means my company will be spending a lot of late nights in July and August trying to prepare.....if the burners don't get delayed again.

    I see the reports of successful tests for 100gb blank media. I'd expect that to be a norm by this time next year and with laser refinements, who knows how far capacities will go.

  4. #4

    Re: Discs for larger sample libraries

    mirage,

    The deal for copy protection certainly affects the movie releases and the multimedia format, but shoudn't affect the data file format, should it?

    I know that the video burn/playback units have been shipping in Japan for about a year, but the stuff you record on them may not be compatible with the "Hollywood" Blu-ray players. Oh well.

    And Chris, good point about HDDs being cheaper than Blu-ray per GB right now!

    -JF

  5. #5

    Re: Discs for larger sample libraries

    So far, there doesn't seem to be any hope that any of the new storage medias will be more reliable than the previous generation. In this regard, I "almost" would prefer the even older generation of magnetic tapes, as they'd just sound worse with wear and tear instead of becoming unreadable altogether like CD ROM's and DVD ROM's. I'm surprised there has never been a class-action lawsuit against the manufacturers of blank CD and DVD ROM's. IMO the utter unreliability/lack of longevity of those products are simply criminal. In the days of cassettes, I NEVER once ran into a bad cassette that couldn't be recorded, or couldn't be read after merely a couple of years, or couldn't be read on another deck. In fact, ALL of my cassette tapes are still perfectly fine, with no detectable loss of quality even now (but to be fair, I haven't exactly been playing them for the last ten or so years--they just sort of sat in a box. I recently started archiving them digitally, that's how I know they are all still good).

  6. #6

    Re: Discs for larger sample libraries

    Quote Originally Posted by Lunatique
    So far, there doesn't seem to be any hope that any of the new storage medias will be more reliable than the previous generation. In this regard, I "almost" would prefer the even older generation of magnetic tapes, as they'd just sound worse with wear and tear instead of becoming unreadable altogether like CD ROM's and DVD ROM's. I'm surprised there has never been a class-action lawsuit against the manufacturers of blank CD and DVD ROM's. IMO the utter unreliability/lack of longevity of those products are simply criminal. In the days of cassettes, I NEVER once ran into a bad cassette that couldn't be recorded, or couldn't be read after merely a couple of years, or couldn't be read on another deck. In fact, ALL of my cassette tapes are still perfectly fine, with no detectable loss of quality even now (but to be fair, I haven't exactly been playing them for the last ten or so years--they just sort of sat in a box. I recently started archiving them digitally, that's how I know they are all still good).
    I take it you never used tape for data then. Back before the advent of the PC I owned a Texas nstruments TI99, which read programs from a tape deck. It used to take about 40 minutes to load a 3K program. More often than not, though, after sitting through 40 minutes of screeching (much like finger nails on a blackboard), it would turn out that some of the data couldn't be read due to tape wear. So tape is really no better in a digital system than a CD.

  7. #7

    Re: Discs for larger sample libraries

    Most data processing centers these days (and many video authoring operations) use LTO2 or LTO3 tape cartridges which are physically about the same size as older DLTs. LTO2 capacity is 200 gig (400 gig compressed) and the tapes go for between $25 to $50. Drives are a bit costly, however, running between $2,500 and $3,000. If the Blueray burners end up going for a couple hundred bucks, they should do very well. Certainly be a nice step up from the 8.5 gig DL DVD+R's I've been using.

    Howard

  8. #8

    Re: Discs for larger sample libraries

    Quote Originally Posted by Pingu
    I take it you never used tape for data then...
    I did - to/from a Juno-60. Not fast. Not reliable.

    Every storage medium these days has failure modes. You'd think that solid state would be great, but I've had a few flash memories die. Maybe I should get some marble a hammer and a chisel and archive my scores...

    -JF

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