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Topic: Orchestral Escapades

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  1. #1

    Orchestral Escapades

    Here's a new piece for any and all listeners. Comments are welcomed and encouraged.

    The piece is built from the Hungarian Major Scale which I didn't know existed until I read Persichetti's book, "Twentienth Century Tonality". I had heard and played the Hungarian minor scale, but never ran into the major version. I took the scale and harmonized each of its notes using the existing root, 3rd, 5th 7th and 9th above each scale degree such that a I chord in C would be: C E G Bb D# and a V Chord would be: G Bb D# F# A. This gave lots a room for dissonants and tension! I then used a mixed meter pattern and constructed some melodic components. The result is a piece in 7/8, 6/8, and 3/4.

    I must say that I'm disappointed in the quality of the mp3 as it is found on my sight at soundclick.com. Does anyone else use Soundclick or is the sound problem general to mp3's at 128 Kbs. I listened using the online player and found the piece to be very, well tinny and lacking solid middle and bottom frequencies. My piece rendered at 44.1K and 32 bit/floating sounds much better in Soundforge or WMV than what I listened to online.

    You can download it or listen to it online here:

    http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=381168
    [Music is the Rhythm, Harmony and Breath of Life]
    "Music is music, and a note's a note" - Louis 'Satchmo' Armstrong

    Rich

  2. #2

    Re: Orchestral Escapades

    Quote Originally Posted by RichR
    Here's a new piece for any and all listeners. Comments are welcomed and encouraged.

    The piece is built from the Hungarian Major Scale which I didn't know existed until I read Persichetti's book, "Twentienth Century Tonality". I had heard and played the Hungarian minor scale, but never ran into the major version. I took the scale and harmonized each of its notes using the existing root, 3rd, 5th 7th and 9th above each scale degree such that a I chord in C would be: C E G Bb D# and a V Chord would be: G Bb D# F# A. This gave lots a room for dissonants and tension! I then used a mixed meter pattern and constructed some melodic components. The result is a piece in 7/8, 6/8, and 3/4.

    I must say that I'm disappointed in the quality of the mp3 as it is found on my sight at soundclick.com. Does anyone else use Soundclick or is the sound problem general to mp3's at 128 Kbs. I listened using the online player and found the piece to be very, well tinny and lacking solid middle and bottom frequencies. My piece rendered at 44.1K and 32 bit/floating sounds much better in Soundforge or WMV than what I listened to online.

    You can download it or listen to it online here:

    http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=381168
    I'm not familiar with a work by Vincent Persichetti by that title; though I have his Twentieth Century Harmony -- a standard, in my opinion, that all modern composers should review, if only for jogging the process of musical thought.

    And this is indeed an interesting exercise in Persichetti-like harmony: In many of his pieces, his stated goal was to enrich harmonic context in a manner that was inclusive of major, minor and dominant characteristics within a single texture. (I don't recall his exact words in the lecture; but that's the sense of them.)

    I might perhaps suggest, though, some thinning of the texure periodically; as the intent, evident in Persichetti's writing, was to exercise contrast with partial elements of the tonal structure, lest the ear tire from the overburden of highly dense harmonic architecture.

    The sound quality was fairly good on this, Richard... though I'd agree there is a discernible difference between 128 Kb/s and 192 Kb/s. There are other factors, too, though, that can make quite a difference. If the tool you use to create the .MP3 file has the options, do *not* allow mid-side joint stereo, intensity joint stereo, or narrowing of the stereo image -- all of which contribute to losses of clarity and presence in the recording.

    Best,

    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  3. #3

    Re: Orchestral Escapades

    What a marvelous piece! I thoroughly enjoyed listening to that. Full of exciting and driving energy. I particularly enjoyed the little quiet interlude towards the end. I agree with David, the sound is pretty good. I'm not sure what quality comes through on the soundclick player.

    Great Job!
    Kind Regards

    Louis Dekker
    My Music Site

    Pour être grand, il faut avoir été petit.

  4. #4

    Re: Orchestral Escapades

    Gosh, in my rambling tangents up there, Richard, I somehow neglected to mention that, yes, I liked the piece.

    Definitely gives one something to sink your choppers into, some good, rich, unabashed, right up front, unapologetic -- dissonance!

    I'm rather fond of such a good meal.

    Good job on this.

    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  5. #5

    Re: Orchestral Escapades

    This was great work!

    your best yet!

    It sounds as though you threw out all the rules/formalities and just took off on this one.!
    Very creative and energetic!

    Great job Rich!


    ~jeff

  6. #6

    Re: Orchestral Escapades

    Thanks for the comments everyone. They are helpful and appreciated.

    David you saic:

    I'm not familiar with a work by Vincent Persichetti by that title; though I have his Twentieth Century Harmony -- a standard
    You are right in my hurry to right the note online, I didn't look at the title of the book and was thinking about his approach to tonality which interested me, so I wrote tonality instead of harmony. My mistake, it is one and the same book and it is indeed an excellent source of learning outside the box.

    Your comments on thinning out the piece in places is well taken!

    LouisD

    Thanks so much for the comments. I'm glad the mp3 came through sounding fine. I first uploaded it at 160 Kbs and found they were reducing it to 128. That made it sound awful thin, so I re-uploaded it encoded at 128 Kbs and it did sound a little better to me. But there's nothing like the original (even if it is only recorded at 44.1K)!

    Jeff said:

    It sounds as though you threw out all the rules/formalities and just took off on this one.!
    You are right. That was my intent. Thanks! Now I'll let it sit and doing some weeding and thinning after some time has passed. Right now I'm too attached to it since it has been big part of daily routine for the passed month and a half!
    [Music is the Rhythm, Harmony and Breath of Life]
    "Music is music, and a note's a note" - Louis 'Satchmo' Armstrong

    Rich

  7. #7

    Re: Orchestral Escapades

    I thought perhaps it might have been a Persichetti book I'd somehow missed. Persichetti was a great teacher (hey, he taught PDQ Bach, you know!)... but my knowledge of him is far from comprehensive.

    Richard, every time you toss the rules up in the air, you come up with something interesting.

    I'd suggest you continue doing that... lol. Next time, throw even higher.

    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  8. #8

    Re: Orchestral Escapades

    A new Methodology!
    I'll give the toss method a try!

    My brother has been after me to do the very same thing as what you are saying. After all Bach, though he defined the rules didn't write the rules, musicologists did.
    [Music is the Rhythm, Harmony and Breath of Life]
    "Music is music, and a note's a note" - Louis 'Satchmo' Armstrong

    Rich

  9. #9

    Re: Orchestral Escapades

    Quote Originally Posted by RichR
    A new Methodology!



    I'll give the toss method a try!

    My brother has been after me to do the very same thing as what you are saying. After all Bach, though he defined the rules didn't write the rules, musicologists did.
    Rules, what rules, there are rules for writing music. Now why didn't someone tell me that. And to think I was just writing what sounded pretty and looked good on paper. All those pretty little dots and lines going up and down the page, very pretty indeed.

    I'll have to try a cup or two of the rules, who's buying?

    (Rich's Brother)

  10. #10

    Re: Orchestral Escapades

    "Orchestral Escapades" has made it to 13th on the Contemporary Classical charts at Soundclick.com. If you haven't done so yet, please go there and listen. It'd be nice to make number one, if only for one day!

    Thanks, here's the link again:

    http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=381168


    [Music is the Rhythm, Harmony and Breath of Life]
    "Music is music, and a note's a note" - Louis 'Satchmo' Armstrong

    Rich

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