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Topic: Are today's radio stations stuck in the early 80's?

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  1. #1

    Are today's radio stations stuck in the early 80's?

    The recent postings about the music industry have caused me to recall something that I've noticed about today's radio...

    Whenever I turn on one of the 4 major pop/dance radio stations in NY, I currently have an 85 to 90 percent chance of hearing something that was in the top 10 in the late 70's or 80's.

    Now here is what puzzles me... I always thought that the way records got played was throught promoters offering all kinds of incentives (ie. concert tickets, promotional events, various give-away goodies for the station) to
    play the record with the backing of a record label budget.

    But here is the rub, half of the tunes I hear on these stations AREN'T EVEN ON A MAJOR LABEL ANYMORE!!!!!!!!!! So, this begs the question; Who's promoting these old hits to these stations? I would think if I were a radio programer at one of these stations, I'd want to play something new that would bring in some type of promotion before I'd play a record that has no promotional push.

    For example, in the last week I've heard Barry White played at least 3 times,
    a bunch of "Freestyle" from the late 80's, and "Staying Alive" by the Bee Gees
    more now than in 1976!!!!!!!

    Where are the current labels with the current hits?

    This situation has me totally baffled.

    jfair
    Last edited by jfair; 03-12-2006 at 12:32 AM. Reason: Corrected title

  2. #2

    Re: Is today's radio stations stuck in the early 80's?

    Well, consider the demographics that must be in play. Radio is now largely after an older, nostalgia oriented audience, plus a lot of kids really like the older stuff too. beyond that, I think most kids are not listening to radio at all. They are downloading onto iPods. Record companies are close to being totally hosed and I say good riddance.

  3. #3

    Re: Is today's radio stations stuck in the early 80's?

    Quote Originally Posted by FredProgGH
    They are downloading onto iPods. Record companies are close to being totally hosed and I say good riddance.
    But ... I like pressed CDs. What about the people who are like me? People who buy CDs and SACDs? I'm not interested in downloading the newest "whoever" and listen to it from an iPod. Ar you saying good riddance to me too?


    ------------
    Alex Cremers

  4. #4
    Senior Member Robert Kooijman's Avatar
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    Re: Are today's radio stations stuck in the early 80's?

    For me, a physical CD is nothing more or less then just a medium.
    Haven't bought any for a looooong time, other then virtually all of Jagjit Singh's collection while living in India. The average cost of these was 100 Rupees each, say 2 USD. Most come without any "sleeve notes" or booklet. But then, the exquisite music makes up for that

    Our small kids either download (bittorrent or allofmp3.com) or copy from the library. With CDs easily costing 20 USD in Sweden, who blames them?

    Regarding radio: when having hundreds or thousands of favorite songs played from your PC or Ipod, this medium has pretty much lost its relevance IMO.

    Cheers, Robert

  5. #5

    Re: Are today's radio stations stuck in the early 80's?

    With CDs easily costing 20 USD in Sweden, who blames them?
    Sweden? Don't they have the most massive pay cheques in the world? And you expect me to feel sorrow for them?

  6. #6

    Re: Are today's radio stations stuck in the early 80's?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexcremers
    Sweden? Don't they have the most massive pay cheques in the world? And you expect me to feel sorrow for them?
    That would be Switzerland Alex and before you start thinking they're all millionaires. Guess how much it costs to rent a house there.

    A new CD in Belgium costs 17-19 euros, that's about 22 dollars. This medium will disappear as kids don't buy CD's anymore, downloading is the future (I buy maybe 3 CD's/year now).

    Imagine an independent artist who doesn't have to press CD's anymore, no booklets, no handling costs for promotion. The CD medium is killing me as an independent artist.

    Mark

  7. #7

    Re: Is today's radio stations stuck in the early 80's?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexcremers
    But ... I like pressed CDs. What about the people who are like me? People who buy CDs and SACDs? I'm not interested in downloading the newest "whoever" and listen to it from an iPod. Ar you saying good riddance to me too?


    ------------
    Alex Cremers
    I guess I should have said major record companies. I promise all us indies will still press CDs.

  8. #8

    Re: Are today's radio stations stuck in the early 80's?

    Who do the stations advertise to? i'd think that would be the big driver. If its the mid 30s crowd with the money, then it makes sense to play their music (i fit that bill and notice pretty much everywhere i go these days its "our" music played in non-dance bars etc).

    Follow the money.

    steve

  9. #9

    Re: Are today's radio stations stuck in the early 80's?

    Quote Originally Posted by kramusica
    A new CD in Belgium costs 17-19 euros, that's about 22 dollars. This medium will disappear as kids don't buy CD's anymore, downloading is the future (I buy maybe 3 CD's/year now).
    Here's a tip: Don't buy CDs when they are just released, just wait for six months or so, then go to the nearest MediaMarkt and get them for 7 Euro.

    Aren't you forgetting that people are also collectors? Some of us do like to psychically hold and treasure an LP, CD or DVD with real printed artwork (ah, the scent of it). What about them? Should we just lie down and die? Have you no mercy? Should I sell my John Williams collection?


    Alex

  10. #10

    Re: Are today's radio stations stuck in the early 80's?

    Let us not forget . . the Baby Boomer's - they drive every market in the world (econimically speaking) - they are now all in their 40's and up - so who do you THINK Radio stations are catering to? The baby boomers - since they used to buy records and cassettes, are more likely to buy CDs and may be in too much future shock to download songs as compared to their grandchildren (and I am NOT trying to insult any baby boomers in this audience - my father and mother are baby boomers and my dad downloads all the time - but almost all of his fellow country club retirees are still amazed at how microwaves heat food so darn fast, no less those new fangled computer contraptions - they'd rather play golf or tennis).

    Two words

    Baby Boomers

    Mike

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