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Topic: Bach Prelude and Fugue in G

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  1. #1
    Senior Member valhalx's Avatar
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    Bach Prelude and Fugue in G

    When I first got GPO I was delighted with the orchestra and hardly ever tinkered with the keyboards. This weekend I decided to do something with the wonderful GPO pipe organ. Here is Bach's Prelude and Fugue in G Major, BWV 541. Feedback most welcome.

    Bill
    Never look at the trombones. It only encourages them. Richard Strauss

    My Website
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  2. #2

    Re: Bach Prelude and Fugue in G

    What a great way to start off my morning; thanks, Bill!

    Excellent job on this -- this piece is a very old and dear friend of mine, and you've done a superb job of both interpreting and rendering it.

    I particularly like the "acoustic environment" on this -- plenty of depth to it; but not overdone, just right, while still giving the pipe organ the kind of expansive sonic terrain it needs to shine. How did you go about the sound treatment?

    All my best,

    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  3. #3

    Re: Bach Prelude and Fugue in G

    Yes, Like David, this gets listened to more than once here too. I have a particular passion for pipe organ with orchestra in a romantic/modern style, but sadly not much work was written for this time that really explored the capabilites of this wonderful instrument. (With the notable exception of Saint-Saens.) Too often it's treated as a solo instrument added to an orchestra, instead of, like much of russian romantic with the piano, actually orchestrated and integrated as 'just one instrument' amongst others. The possibilites are certainly there for more variation in tone colour.

    Got to say this though, that's a great sounding organ, and i had no idea this was part of the Garritan package. I can hear it in my head tonally as a potential addition to an orchestra, and there are few sampled organs that do that.

    Bill, the performance is excellent, and as David notes, the environment is certainly worthy of both the piece and the instrument.

    Right, i'm off to listen again.

    Regards,

    Alex.

  4. #4
    Senior Member valhalx's Avatar
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    Re: Bach Prelude and Fugue in G

    Glad I could start your day off on a good note. We should all launch into Monday feeling good I too admire this work. You could say G Major never sounded so majestic.

    Quote Originally Posted by etLux
    I particularly like the "acoustic environment" on this -- plenty of depth to it; but not overdone, just right, while still giving the pipe organ the kind of expansive sonic terrain it needs to shine. How did you go about the sound treatment?
    I have lately been paying close attention to reverb. I am now using SIR with its Impulse Responses. This particular IR was taken at a church under construction that will seat 1500. It was an empty shell at the time allowing for a long reverb. The is space not nearly as large as a cathedral so that there is a brightness to the somewhat extended verb.
    Never look at the trombones. It only encourages them. Richard Strauss

    My Website
    Beethoven's Eroica
    Antonio Salieri
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  5. #5
    Senior Member valhalx's Avatar
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    Re: Bach Prelude and Fugue in G

    Alex,
    Thanks for the listen. I agree with your point on using the organ as part of the orchestra. You cited Saint-Saens. An other example that comes to mind is Mahler's Eight Symphony. The organ can convey a number of emotions and moods within the orchestra.

    Bill
    Never look at the trombones. It only encourages them. Richard Strauss

    My Website
    Beethoven's Eroica
    Antonio Salieri
    The History of Studebaker

  6. #6

    Re: Bach Prelude and Fugue in G

    Bill,

    Superb performance! I can add to the complements of the reverb, it sounds outstandingly natural. It makes for chilling realism. I would have to listen hard and I think it is almost impossible to tell that this is not real. Your use of stops is also very sensitive.

    This is a great job .
    Kind Regards

    Louis Dekker
    My Music Site

    Pour être grand, il faut avoir été petit.

  7. #7
    Senior Member valhalx's Avatar
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    Re: Bach Prelude and Fugue in G

    Thanks Louis. I'm relieved you liked my use of stops. I have to admit, my cat knows more about nuclear physics than I do about the pipe organ. I originally had the opening played on full organ but decided Coronets would be a nice touch. I recommend SIR to everybody. Its easy to use, dozens of sound environments and best of all, its free.

    Bill
    Never look at the trombones. It only encourages them. Richard Strauss

    My Website
    Beethoven's Eroica
    Antonio Salieri
    The History of Studebaker

  8. #8

    Re: Bach Prelude and Fugue in G

    Nice going, William! That is a BIIIIGGGGGG, magnificent sound!

    Thanks for sharing with us.

    LGA
    Larry G. Alexander
    www.alexandermusic.com

  9. #9

    Re: Bach Prelude and Fugue in G

    Quote Originally Posted by valhalx
    When I first got GPO I was delighted with the orchestra and hardly ever tinkered with the keyboards. This weekend I decided to do something with the wonderful GPO pipe organ. Here is Bach's Prelude and Fugue in G Major, BWV 541. Feedback most welcome.

    Bill
    Thanks Bill, I really enjoyed this. A superb bright and spacious sound - a credit to the GPO organ! For my taste, I would take the fugue a little slower - but I always say that about Bach! Graham.

  10. #10
    Senior Member valhalx's Avatar
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    Re: Bach Prelude and Fugue in G

    Quote Originally Posted by GrahamKeitch
    Thanks Bill, I really enjoyed this. A superb bright and spacious sound - a credit to the GPO organ! For my taste, I would take the fugue a little slower - but I always say that about Bach! Graham.
    Thanks for the listen Graham. My taste in tempo has changed over the years. When I was a young pup I revered Klemperer and his broad tempi. In my old age (56) I have developed a liking for brisk tempi. Can't explain it. I have also recently developed a taste for redheads, Tango and German cheese. (The mind is a fragile thing, lol)
    Bill
    Never look at the trombones. It only encourages them. Richard Strauss

    My Website
    Beethoven's Eroica
    Antonio Salieri
    The History of Studebaker

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