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Topic: Take 2 - Prelude 1 in c minor

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  1. #1
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    Take 2 - Prelude 1 in c minor

    The reason I called the first a rough draft….

    When I showed my two preludes to my instructor, he said, “nice, but they aren’t really in the style we are studying.” Oh well, a little more review and off to make the second version. I still might change parts of it. I also have to look at all of the voice leadings created by virtual middle voices.

    The second prelude won’t be posted until after I get back from a little business/ski trip I am taking. That is, sometime the second week of March.

    Anyway, here is the revised version:

    Prelude 1 in c minor
    Trent P. McDonald

  2. #2

    Re: Take 2 - Prelude 1 in c minor

    Ah, well, I'll probably take it between the eyes for this; so be it: I see absolutely no point, no benefit, no merit in the common "educational" practice of inflicting endless pain, boredom, and wasted hours upon students of composition by requiring them to slavishly reproduce the work and thought of one or another dead composer. A limited amount of that in the study of theory is well worthwhile to assure understanding. It may be tacit, but it's implicit in the definition of composition to create something new, rather than commit mimicry.

    ~

    Please forgive me for usurping space in your thread with such a rant, Trent.

    My perception of this piece is that it is a truly beautiful piece of writing, admired deservedly.

    And if there are any dead composers in there, I can't say as I hear anyone but you, Trent.

    Best,

    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  3. #3
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    Re: Take 2 - Prelude 1 in c minor

    David,

    I understand your little “rant”. My instructors point isn’t to try to make me into a little Mozart or Chopin. The idea is to increase my language for when I write pieces in the style of Trent. Or so the story goes...

    I started years ago writing rock songs so I have a tendency to write everything with very strong patterns, which I guess goes against the Romantic school of thought. I actually like to try to break out of the patterns and try for a more flowing music.

    Anyway, the main difference between this and the first version is I tried to give a more “Romantic” accompaniment – the melody is almost the same. Oh, by the way, I just posted a new version – two notes are different so don’t take the time to download unless you are very curious.

    The other prelude, which I’ll work on later, he thought was closer. He thought it a little too regular and Bach-like for the Romantic era. I’m going to see if I can get it to work in 6/8 time.

    Anyway, thanks for your kind comments.
    Trent P. McDonald

  4. #4

    Re: Take 2 - Prelude 1 in c minor

    Thanks for the forebearance, Trent.

    Just *my* opinion, of course... lol... but I've always felt more progress is made by understanding the musical forces involved than by blindly imitating.

    David.

  5. #5

    Re: Take 2 - Prelude 1 in c minor

    Nice... again! I certainly can't say one version of this prelude is better than the other, but they are similar and unique at once. Perhaps you could call it "A variation on a prelude by myself"

    Having never formally studied music, I'm probably not one to speak about the educational value of such exercises... but I will anyway... I don't think the intent of such exercises is to get the student to blindly imitate, but to help the student recognize and understand those musical forces that are present in styles of the past. Surely if I could learn to imitate Mozart, whose style I love, my own music would at least please me more.

    However... the thing is... what if you were learning about a style you didn't care about? Would there be any educational value in studying such a style that you did not plan to use? One could say you would "broaden the horizons", but would there really be any value in that?

    Sorry for going all off topic...

    Great work!
    Sean Patrick Hannifin
    My MP3s | My Melody Generator | my album
    "serious music" ... as if the rest of us are just kidding

  6. #6

    Re: Take 2 - Prelude 1 in c minor

    First off, David, I couldn't agree with you more. I respect the HELL out of the masters of every genre; "if it wasn't for them..." But we, modern day composers, do need education; but must push on and further the art of music composition. Formal education is also relevant in helping one to describe and communicate verbally his/her work; their craft...

    I really like this piece especially the mood it creates. I enjoyed the chromaticism, (that may be whats bothering your teacher if your studying Mozart) and the right hand phrasing is superb.

    Michael
    "...Wiktor's a Jekyll-Hyde personality..." - Lycos Music
    http://www.miserymadebeautiful.com

  7. #7
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    Re: Take 2 - Prelude 1 in c minor

    Quote Originally Posted by SeanHannifin
    Surely if I could learn to imitate Mozart, whose style I love, my own music would at least please me more.
    Sean, you like Mozart? I didn’t know! I listened to your wind quartet and was pleasantly surprised that it didn’t sound like Mozart. Nothing against Mozart, of course, but it’s nice to see you are developing your own voice.

    When my instructor assigned a classical style sonata at the end of last year we had not gone over any sonatas, just harmony and thematic development in general. I was free to choose to model my sonata after any I wanted or nobody in particular.

    The problem with this assignment is that Chopin was the only one that I know about who did this type of prelude since Bach. So how do I sound like myself when I have one composer's work to model myself after, and another who can be an inspiration, but not a model?

    Actually, I really enjoy the challenge.

    Thanks again for listening and for your comments.
    Trent P. McDonald

  8. #8
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    Re: Take 2 - Prelude 1 in c minor

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael A. Wiktor
    First off, David, I couldn't agree with you more. I respect the HELL out of the masters of every genre; "if it wasn't for them..." But we, modern day composers, do need education; but must push on and further the art of music composition. Formal education is also relevant in helping one to describe and communicate verbally his/her work; their craft...

    I really like this piece especially the mood it creates. I enjoyed the chromaticism, (that may be whats bothering your teacher if your studying Mozart) and the right hand phrasing is superb.

    Michael
    Thanks Michael.

    The assignment was to write a Romantic style prelude with Chopin given as a model, so the chromaticism was OK. There is another version of this in an earlier thread where the left hand is a very regular 2 beat arpeggio with the same 2 notes ending the arpeggio on every chord. My instructor felt that wasn’t in the Romantic style. This version is my reaction/correction based on his comments. If you listen to the first 2 beats of every chord, I left that arpeggio in place, I just don’t repeat it 4 times for each chord like I did in the first version. The right hand part was pretty much unchanged between the two versions.

    I brought up Mozart because my last assignment was a classical style piano sonata.

    Thanks for listening and for taking the time to comment.
    Trent P. McDonald

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