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Topic: LEARNING CURVE

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  1. #1

    LEARNING CURVE

    Hi, i am classically trained musician. Have some knowledge in musical production.
    I'm looking 4 an advice on getting to know electronic symphonic libraries.
    Would you recommend me some tutorials or project files for analysis or any other methods of mastering the subject?
    Should i write score then program it?
    Would it help to recreate classical scores?

    TIA,
    GEORGE

  2. #2
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: LEARNING CURVE

    Depending on your production experience, you might be able to jump right in. If you've done MIDI programming before, that would help.

    It's probably a good idea to pick a score you know well, and to realize it as a tuturial project. That way, you're dealing with a piece that's already recorded by an acoustic ensemble, and you can learn the tricks of getting the samples to articulate musically.

    The example I use most is that it's like rehearsing an ensemble of idiots with great tones. They sound great, they play in tune, but their musical intuitiveness is at absolute zero. So, by rote, you "teach" them every single phrase.

    Fortunately, unlike the idiot ensemble, this ensemble only has to be taught once.

    Best regards,
    Bruce

  3. #3

    Re: LEARNING CURVE

    The guide to midi orchestration could help, here is a link(i hope it's O.K. ) http://www.musicworks-atlanta.com/

    I think there's a tutorial here on the Garritan's forum, and i hear there's an other one on the VSL forum.

    Good luck and have a good time.

  4. #4

    Re: LEARNING CURVE

    Hi George,

    Also keep in mind the technical computer part of things too. There are a thousand different ways to appraoch this, but depending on how much time you can dedicate, you'll save yourself headaches as well as time if you have a pro DAW shop build your first computer and install your sequencer software and one or two libs and make sure it all works. Learning the software will be enough for you right now without hardware and install problems. It is a huge learning curve, but worth it and hope you have some fun.

    Good luck,
    Joanne

    PS - try to resist just "getting started" by using your present personal PC - it typically does not have a happy ending

  5. #5

    Re: LEARNING CURVE

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce A. Richardson
    It's probably a good idea to pick a score you know well, and to realize it as a tuturial project. That way, you're dealing with a piece that's already recorded by an acoustic ensemble, and you can learn the tricks of getting the samples to articulate musically.
    Best regards,
    Bruce
    This is good advice. When you realise someone else's score you have to be creative in finding ways to achieve what the composer intended. When you program your own you can make compromises because you don't think that the samples will do what you want. In the second scenario there is nothing wrong with this, and if your project is going to stay in the MIDI domain (i.e. never be played by "live" musicians) then I would say that you should always write what sounds best with the samples, but in the first instance you have to learn that which is not easy. This way you will probably become a better programmer in the long run.

    D

  6. #6

    Re: LEARNING CURVE

    Many thanks for your suggestions, Bruce A. Richardson, geronimo001, Joanne Babunovic, Daryl

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce A. Richardson
    It's probably a good idea to pick a score you know well, and to realize it as a tuturial project.
    I'll try that and i'll also try the tutorial. Thank you! Georg

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