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Topic: Allright - so who's going to be spending ELEVEN GRAND on a sample library?

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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Allright - so who's going to be spending ELEVEN GRAND on a sample library?

    800,00 samples

    WOW

    500 GIG

    WOW

    $11,000 USD

    WOW

    Anyone?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Re: Allright - so who's going to be spending ELEVEN GRAND on a sample library?

    Quote Originally Posted by RiffWraith
    Couldn't have said it better myself. Pass, thanks.

    Belbin

  3. #3

    Re: Allright - so who's going to be spending ELEVEN GRAND on a sample library?

    At least with a Proteus Orchestra you have your own sound. Retro is hip!

  4. #4
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: Allright - so who's going to be spending ELEVEN GRAND on a sample library?

    The thing is, they've always been very clear about their intentions to do exactly what they have done. This was something Herb talked about before the very first version came out.

    Whether one agrees with the way the product has evolved in whole cloth, what cannot be argued is that VSL has provided a lot of people with a lot of earning power. The difference in VSL and almost every other library on the market is that you can get most every end result you'd need from VSL. People are always debating the finer points of reverb vs. hall-recording, and those arguments have some merit as finer points.

    But the OVERWHELMING point is that VSL will get you there, with a musical product you can sell, in almost every conceivable commercial application. I've found few exceptions, and they're almost exclusively in the realm of transparently exposed solos that any producer worth his salt is going to plan for a live player anyway.

    There are plenty of cheap orchestral libraries out there. No one has done what VSL has done, thus far, and there's a reason for that. You don't see the VSL principal players investing in yachts on the money they're taking out of the industry. They put the money into the vision, and spent massively to arrive at their goals. Even the first edition collections put massive power into the hands of the end user. They were released on platforms that WORKED from day one. That is a big contrast with other products, both cheap and expensive, which can pull off certain signature sounds, but cannot express very well outside their stylistic boundaries. Or that released expensive products on platforms that couldn't deliver. That "upper 10%" of flexibility and hit-the-ground-running dedendability probably cost 90% of the financial investment. Those are the things that separate the men from the boys, so to speak.

    I guess that is going the long way around saying that VSL has continually put its money where it's mouth is: That VSL has spent the money you've invested in it to continually push on the boundaries. In other cases, the money has not gone into that kind of reinvestment. So, I think it's important to consider broader implications and the merits of all those things. I don't think the portrayal of VSL as some kind of villain really fits the facts.

  5. #5

    Re: Allright - so who's going to be spending ELEVEN GRAND on a sample library?

    So are you buying, Bruce?

  6. #6

    Re: Allright - so who's going to be spending ELEVEN GRAND on a sample library?

    Calling the new VSL instruments a sample library is an understatement if i ever heard one.
    I watched the world premiere presentation in munich last saturday and i was totally blown away.(just like everybody else who was in the same room)
    Enter the Matrixstyle orchestra!
    I will definetly go for the blue pill this time!

    best
    Hans

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Re: Allright - so who's going to be spending ELEVEN GRAND on a sample library?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouch that hurts
    So are you buying, Bruce?
    I'm thinking seriously about it now. Just for the ease of use on repetitions alone. Lot of dough though - it's a hard one. It's the peripheral stuff that you might need as well - like more computers etc. Then there's MIR. Whoaa! May be a tough one to justify.

  8. #8

    Re: Allright - so who's going to be spending ELEVEN GRAND on a sample library?

    My impression here is that the new Symphonic Cube VST allows you to work more "right out of the box" and just focus on playing, rather than creating multiple tracks for one instrument (one track for legato, one for staccato, etc). To me, spending $10k isn't really worth it.. I've been using the method above for a few years now.. so I'm used to it.

    I will say that the 35% discount on Pro Edition and most Horizon Series products is nice, though And I WILL be taking advantage of that..
    Sam Hulick
    Composer
    http://www.samhulick.com/

  9. #9

    Re: Allright - so who's going to be spending ELEVEN GRAND on a sample library?

    I own a few horizon products, and Gold.

    I am seriously considering buying the cube at the standard version, based soley on the playability I have seen demonstrated.

    But I cannot afford the full extended version. If required, I may then augment the basic set by purchasing the extended functionality on an instrument by instrument basis.

  10. #10

    Re: Allright - so who's going to be spending ELEVEN GRAND on a sample library?

    Bruce...overall, VSL is a very large step forward. But I wouldn't say it's allowed people to do things that the average client can even hear, much less award more work from. "Wow, sounds great, Tom" I've heard from clients for years, and it doesn't seem to matter what sample library I use. I was really disappointed after using VSL on a project for the first time, not by the results, but by the fact that the client didn't seem to notice any change, for better or worse. They were just happy. But they've always been happy.

    I think we as the creators notice this stuff way more than clients do. And I'm not basing this on just one client. QLSO will get you there too, although in some cases and some finer points it certainly doesn't do what VSL does. But it's priced within reason, and we've all heard the results it can get.

    So no, I can't justify the price of VSL. Especially when I find myself doubling their Performance Legato violins (all 14 of 'em!) with other libraries so that they don't sound like nails on a blackboard when playing in higher registers. Or using oboes from other libraries because someone at VSL thought having a legato oboe with no vibrato was a cool idea.


    My 6000 grand into the Cube and Perf Set was enough already, but I'll keep buying Lotto tickets.

    TH




    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce A. Richardson
    The thing is, they've always been very clear about their intentions to do exactly what they have done. This was something Herb talked about before the very first version came out.

    Whether one agrees with the way the product has evolved in whole cloth, what cannot be argued is that VSL has provided a lot of people with a lot of earning power. The difference in VSL and almost every other library on the market is that you can get most every end result you'd need from VSL. People are always debating the finer points of reverb vs. hall-recording, and those arguments have some merit as finer points.

    But the OVERWHELMING point is that VSL will get you there, with a musical product you can sell, in almost every conceivable commercial application. I've found few exceptions, and they're almost exclusively in the realm of transparently exposed solos that any producer worth his salt is going to plan for a live player anyway.

    There are plenty of cheap orchestral libraries out there. No one has done what VSL has done, thus far, and there's a reason for that. You don't see the VSL principal players investing in yachts on the money they're taking out of the industry. They put the money into the vision, and spent massively to arrive at their goals. Even the first edition collections put massive power into the hands of the end user. They were released on platforms that WORKED from day one. That is a big contrast with other products, both cheap and expensive, which can pull off certain signature sounds, but cannot express very well outside their stylistic boundaries. Or that released expensive products on platforms that couldn't deliver. That "upper 10%" of flexibility and hit-the-ground-running dedendability probably cost 90% of the financial investment. Those are the things that separate the men from the boys, so to speak.

    I guess that is going the long way around saying that VSL has continually put its money where it's mouth is: That VSL has spent the money you've invested in it to continually push on the boundaries. In other cases, the money has not gone into that kind of reinvestment. So, I think it's important to consider broader implications and the merits of all those things. I don't think the portrayal of VSL as some kind of villain really fits the facts.

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