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Topic: Bach Cantata 51

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  1. #1
    Senior Member valhalx's Avatar
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    Bach Cantata 51

    This weekend I've taken a break from a monster project and finally tried my hand at ensemble building. For my subject I've chosen the aria Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen from Bach's Cantata No 51, one of my favorite Bach arias.

    The ensemble consists of -
    1st Violins - 6 players
    2nd Violins - 6 players
    Violas - 4 players
    Cellos - 4 players
    Basses - 3 players
    Trumpet 1 Solo
    Oboe Classical Solo (in lieu of a soprano - my girlfriend is an alto and my cat is a prima donna and refuses to sing the part on the grounds he's waiting for a gig in Wagner's Flying Dutchman.)

    Comments welcome. Enjoy.
    Last edited by valhalx; 11-27-2005 at 10:02 PM. Reason: typo
    Never look at the trombones. It only encourages them. Richard Strauss

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  2. #2
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Re: Bach Cantata 51

    ...my cat is a prima donna and refuses to sing the part on the grounds he's waiting for a gig in Wagner's Flying Dutchman.
    Ha! That's great!
    Ah, Bach ... always nice to hear ... Nice! The Oboe sounds nice! Very enjoyable.
    Styxx

  3. #3
    Senior Member valhalx's Avatar
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    Re: Bach Cantata 51

    Quote Originally Posted by Styxx
    Ha! That's great!
    Ah, Bach ... always nice to hear ... Nice! The Oboe sounds nice! Very enjoyable.
    Thanks Styxx. I just listened to this again this morning and realized (Yikes!) that everything was panned to the right. I just uploaded a corrected file. And the cat says he will consider the Bach piece if he gets more tuna. Cats.
    Never look at the trombones. It only encourages them. Richard Strauss

    My Website
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    Antonio Salieri
    The History of Studebaker

  4. #4
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Re: Bach Cantata 51

    And I thought is was these cheap laptop speakers.
    I'll have to listen again.
    Styxx

  5. #5

    Re: Bach Cantata 51

    God, that's beautiful!

    We just did that piece at my Church three weeks ago, with live instruments, but it's amazing how well you captured the wonderful energy of that piece. Great sounds!

    Two minor things: a harpsichord, or some kind of continuo, would be a great addition (and very idiomatic, of course).

    I also think you have a wrong note, somewhere in the violas (or midrange) around 0:31 -- sounds like there's a G sounding in the middle of what should be a D6 chord -- you might wanna check it out...

    Maybe also (3rd minor thing!) more incisive, staccato first eighth notes.

    Great job!

    Steve Main
    Steve Main
    stmain@aol.com
    www.stephenmain.com

  6. #6
    Senior Member valhalx's Avatar
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    Re: Bach Cantata 51

    Quote Originally Posted by stmain
    I also think you have a wrong note, somewhere in the violas (or midrange) around 0:31 -- sounds like there's a G sounding in the middle of what should be a D6 chord -- you might wanna check it out...

    Maybe also (3rd minor thing!) more incisive, staccato first eighth notes.
    Thanks Steve. I appreciate you listening. Good call on the wrong note. It was the cellos playing a G instead of a D. As for the staccoto, I've found that there is point at which a clipped note just sounds too short rather than a crisp staccato. The reason is, I believe, a staccoto note in most cases has a unique attack, particularly with strings. As sampling evolves, I feel the developers should begin to look at attack for added realism.
    Thanks again, Bill
    Never look at the trombones. It only encourages them. Richard Strauss

    My Website
    Beethoven's Eroica
    Antonio Salieri
    The History of Studebaker

  7. #7

    Re: Bach Cantata 51

    Bill

    Another smashing piece of work. I thoroughly enjoyed that! I agree with one of the other comments, that a harpsichord continuo happily tinkling away in the background would make a splendid addition to your rendering .

    Great Job!

    LouisD

  8. #8
    Senior Member valhalx's Avatar
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    Re: Bach Cantata 51

    Quote Originally Posted by LouisD
    ...a harpsichord continuo happily tinkling away in the background would make a splendid addition to your rendering.
    Thanks Louis. I always appreciate your comments. Some day I'll learn to read those funny little numbers under the score, LOL.

    Bill
    Never look at the trombones. It only encourages them. Richard Strauss

    My Website
    Beethoven's Eroica
    Antonio Salieri
    The History of Studebaker

  9. #9

    Re: Bach Cantata 51

    Quote Originally Posted by valhalx
    Some day I'll learn to read those funny little numbers under the score, LOL.

    Bill
    Say Bill
    You're kidding right!!!!??? RIGHT?

    One's never too old to learn!!!

    Kind Regards

    LouisD

  10. #10

    Re: Bach Cantata 51

    I love it very much as every Bach's composition.

    To make harpsichord basso continuo without spent time on "numbered bass" interpretation (being you able or not to do it...;-)), you may merge all string voices over middle C in the single stave treble clef of the right hand, and edit it, erasing all overlapping, crossing, too fast and too far notes, but keeping resulting chords.
    The left hand will play in bass clef only the BC line (usually the whole cello line, or the indipendent BC line)

    If you are familiar with keyboard playing technics, it's very easy to recognize and realize in a credible way the chord sequence as a reduction of the orchestral score. Some "arpeggiato" effect will complete the work.

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