• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Topic: Mixing in Sonar

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Smile Mixing in Sonar

    Hi,
    I read Paul Giangregorio's tutorial regarding Sonar. I would like to offer an alternative to his mixing style. I would be happy to hear comments on the differences.

    Paul seems to do all his mixing on the midi side. I do not. Once I've finished scoring, I fill up tracks with sound (without going over 0 db) and convert all tracks to audio. I do only one midi to audio conversion. Once tracks are converted to audio, I archive all midi tracks. I apply effects and mix totally in audio.

    I use a bus structure similar to Paul's tutorial, but I find one must apply some effects to individual audio tracks in addition to buses. Once I tweak the individual tracks, I use the freeze function on individual tracks and send them to buses, where I apply additional effects, pan, balance, etc.

    A few techniques I use that might (or might not) help in creating gorgeous sound: 1) I don't use the mod wheel while recording. I fill up the track with sound, then use automation envelopes after I convert to audio to do everything the mod wheel does. 2) I layer midi tracks (and there are effects I do to layered tracks different from the dominant track) and place them under the dominant track, and 3) boost the high end EQ on the master just a little bit in my final mix.

    Paul says folks should spend most of their time writing and less time mixing.
    I spend as much - or more - time mixing and mastering as I consider those functions to be highly artistic.

    Regards,
    Laura Black

  2. #2

    Re: Mixing in Sonar

    Quote Originally Posted by LauraBlack
    I don't use the mod wheel while recording. I fill up the track with sound, then use automation envelopes after I convert to audio to do everything the mod wheel does.
    I believe you are missing part of what the mod wheel does. Once the track has been converted to audio, you can still affect its volume, but the mod wheel also affects timbre by selecting samples of instrumentalists playing at different dynamic levels. A french horn played loudly sounds very different than a french horn played softly, but with the volume turned up.
    - Jamie Kowalski

    All Hands Music - Kowalski on the web
    The Ear Is Always Correct - Writings on composition

  3. #3
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Chandler, Arizona
    Posts
    4,044

    Re: Mixing in Sonar

    You definitely want to use the mod wheel for controlling volume. As Jamie mentioned, it controls both volume and timbre. Your sound will remain static if you just change the volume. GPO was designed differently than other libraries and the mod wheel was a very important part of the design.

    Jim

  4. #4

    Smile Re: Mixing in Sonar

    Quote Originally Posted by Haydn
    You definitely want to use the mod wheel for controlling volume. As Jamie mentioned, it controls both volume and timbre. Your sound will remain static if you just change the volume. GPO was designed differently than other libraries and the mod wheel was a very important part of the design.

    Jim
    Thanks, guys. I was really talking about mixing, but as far as the mod wheel is concerned, I use a WX-5 for solo passages so the mod wheel is a mute point. However, for section work, I want to control all section instruments simultaneously, so I've developed work-arounds that suffice. As to the changes in horn timbre, I sat near Dale Clevenger for a number of years. During Mahler, Bruckner and Stauss weeks, it took several hours after rehearsal to recover.

    Thanks for the responses and sound advice. I'll keep in mind your suggestions.
    Laura Black

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •