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Topic: Copyright costs = a new VST

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  1. #1

    Copyright costs = a new VST

    When copyrighting your material… is it possible to send off an entire cd album to be copyrighted? Would that give you copyrights over each song? And if so, would that cost the same $30 submission fee (or whatever $) or would it be more? Am I really forced to spend around $300 to copyright 10 songs that I want to put on my next completed CD album project? That's a new VST right there ... =/

  2. #2

    Re: Copyright costs = a new VST

    copyright is granted to the author automatically, you don't have to "send the songs" to anywhere or pay any amount. you hold the copyright of any work of art you do yourself.

  3. #3

    Re: Copyright costs = a new VST

    Quote Originally Posted by zion15
    copyright is granted to the author automatically, you don't have to "send the songs" to anywhere or pay any amount. you hold the copyright of any work of art you do yourself.
    I disagree. My understnading is there are some signifiant additional protections afforded if you obtain an a copyright throught the US copyright office.

    You can get the copyright on your complete CD for (I think) $35.00. You do not have to get a separate copyright for each song. I think you should fill out the SR form to get a copyright on the recording and the underlying work.

    jeffn1
    For original progressive electronic rock influenced by J.S. Bach and (old) Rush, check out: www.soundclick.com/jeffreynaness.

  4. #4

    Re: Copyright costs = a new VST

    From www.copyright.gov :

    COPYRIGHT REGISTRATION

    In general, copyright registration is a legal formality intended to make a public record of the basic facts of a particular copyright. However, registration is not a condition of copyright protection. Even though registration is not a requirement for protection, the copyright law provides several inducements or advantages to encourage copyright owners to make registration. Among these advantages are the following:

    Registration establishes a public record of the copyright claim.

    Before an infringement suit may be filed in court, registration is necessary for works of U. S. origin.

    If made before or within 5 years of publication, registration will establish prima facie evidence in court of the validity of the copyright and of the facts stated in the certificate.

    If registration is made within 3 months after publication of the work or prior to an infringement of the work, statutory damages and attorney's fees will be available to the copyright owner in court actions. Otherwise, only an award of actual damages and profits is available to the copyright owner.

    Registration allows the owner of the copyright to record the registration with the U. S. Customs Service for protection against the importation of infringing copies.

    For additional information, request Publication No. 563 "How to Protect Your Intellectual Property Right," from: U.S. Customs Service, P.O. Box 7404, Washington, D.C. 20044. See the U.S. Customs Service Website at www.customs.gov for online publications.

    Registration may be made at any time within the life of the copyright. Unlike the law before 1978, when a work has been registered in unpublished form, it is not necessary to make another registration when the work becomes published, although the copyright owner may register the published edition, if desired.

  5. #5

    Re: Copyright costs = a new VST

    sorry, i always forget that lots of things are different in the usa (and other countries too of course, american system just seems a lot different from ours). i should probably keep my mouth shut with these things.

    for the record, in finland there's no such bureau but you can gain additional copyright protection (and fees from radio play etc) by joining a "musicians' copyright organization" and submitting your works to their lists which is one time fee for joining and free submissions as far as i know. it's an institution with an official status and special permissions but not one that's in full control of government.

  6. #6

    Re: Copyright costs = a new VST

    So each and everyone song would be copywritten and protected if sent together on a compiled CD? If so that is great news and will definitely be saving me some considerable funds. But it begs the question, why don't people just load their CD submissions with as many original recordings as possible? Or do they and I just didn't know about it? I knew about the fact that I own the copyright of my material as soon as I create it but that seems kind of trivial ... how do I know or control whether someone on the other side of the country is gigging with a few of my songs in his repetoire.... Having something that actually holds up in court seems necessary almost... well .. perhaps that doesn't happen so much .. but it's nice to have that peace of mind I suppose.

  7. #7

    Re: Copyright costs = a new VST

    My understanding, for the USA at least, is that when you copyright all your songs together like that, they are copyrighted en masse, not individually. So, for example, if you were approached by someone to use one of the songs you copyrighted on a single CD, and you granted them permission to use that one song, you have also granted them permission to use ALL the songs that you registered on the CD. My understanding is that if you want to control them individually afterwords, you can send another form (once you've received the copyright paper from the copyright office), and another $100 or so, and that will copyright them individually. I think it's form CA for copyright amplification or correction...

  8. #8

    Re: Copyright costs = a new VST

    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Blaske
    The copyright fee is trivial and inconsequential. What costs big money is hiring expensive lawyers to go after someone that's infringing on your copyright, or to defend yourself when someone else claims you're infringing on theirs. That's when you need deep pockets, or good insurance.

    Lee Blaske
    Good point and duly noted.

    thx everyone btw for all the info ...

    and that $100 to individualize your songs after a CD copyright is still less than $35 per song .. so it's not a bad way to go if that is indeed accurate.

  9. #9

    Re: Copyright costs = a new VST

    I sometimes see entire CDs copyrighted by submitting form SR with a $30 fee. This form is technically for Sound Recordings (hence the SR designation) but the instructions indicate it can also cover the underlying compositions if the author and SR owners are the same. In that case the instructions say you can itemize the song titles in the lower part of space #1 and onto a continuation sheet if necessary. Here's a link to the form and instructions:

    http://www.copyright.gov/forms/formsri.pdf

    The alternative way to register is to use one form PA (with fee) per song.

    Howard

  10. #10

    Re: Copyright costs = a new VST

    Quote Originally Posted by mcdoma2000
    My understanding, for the USA at least, is that when you copyright all your songs together like that, they are copyrighted en masse, not individually. So, for example, if you were approached by someone to use one of the songs you copyrighted on a single CD, and you granted them permission to use that one song, you have also granted them permission to use ALL the songs that you registered on the CD. My understanding is that if you want to control them individually afterwords, you can send another form (once you've received the copyright paper from the copyright office), and another $100 or so, and that will copyright them individually. I think it's form CA for copyright amplification or correction...
    That's not true actually. The manner in which a song is copywritten has nothing to do with the license deals a publisher makes regarding the usage of individual songs (which may be part of a compilation).

    One can send in a CD of works and everything is just listed under the same copyright number. If one wants to have songs listed seperately for whatever reason...you can file an amendment form later for another fee to list out the individual songs in that compilation.

    But the copyright registration is not changed (for better or worse) either way. It is all still a registered copyright the same.

    And yes...one does not have to register any of thier works to own the copyright in the US. You own it already by creating the work. The benefit of registering with the coyright office is that it is really the only for sure way to prove that you do in fact own the copyright if any legal case should arise in the future.
    Regards,
    Brian W. Ralston

    Check out my new FREE iPhone App! Click Here!

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