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Topic: V-drum-machines: Trick or Treat?

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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Apr 2005
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    St. John's NL
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    V-drum-machines: Trick or Treat?

    I've always sequenced my drum parts. On a project where I'd like to not have to worry about all the fills and nuance, I reckon I may actually have a use for cakewalk's session drummer. This neccesitates drum maps, as I plan to use it with samples loaded into multiple channels of GS3.

    Does anyone out there have anything positive to say about a tools like session drummer? Or am I, as someone who likes to think he's good at sequencing beats, better off doing it the old fashioned way? I've experimented with it a bit, and think it may be a great time saver if I got to know it, and did some drum mapping to make it functional with my non-GM stuff. I'm just reluctant, because it's ANOTHER one of those setup related things that keeps me from music-making for even longer. I'm sick of that...

    Thoughts?

    Belbin

  2. #2

    Re: V-drum-machines: Trick or Treat?

    I say just sequence the part yourself from scratch. Every song is different, after all.

  3. #3

    Re: V-drum-machines: Trick or Treat?

    Hey Belbin,

    Keep sequencing. Loops are cool for some things and can be used a lot but also sequencing your own drum patters is still great for song work.

    You can also build your own loops. Sometimes it's best to turn your midi into audio chop it up and quantize the audio or slide it around. Midi has bad timing and over the length of the sound makes it sound unstable. Turning your midi into audio loops then working with that will make your songs tighter.

    One thing you can do is create a two bar loop of your drum pattern and arrange it in the verse and another for the chorus. Then you can add your fills and stuff in the breaks between verse and chorus. Then you can add canned loops in the break out sections or over the basic pattern for variety. The canned loops you add can be anything other than kick and snare patters for variety.

    Ars

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    St. John's NL
    Posts
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    Re: V-drum-machines: Trick or Treat?

    Quote Originally Posted by ArsNova
    Hey Belbin,

    Keep sequencing. Loops are cool for some things and can be used a lot but also sequencing your own drum patters is still great for song work.

    You can also build your own loops. Sometimes it's best to turn your midi into audio chop it up and quantize the audio or slide it around. Midi has bad timing and over the length of the sound makes it sound unstable. Turning your midi into audio loops then working with that will make your songs tighter.

    One thing you can do is create a two bar loop of your drum pattern and arrange it in the verse and another for the chorus. Then you can add your fills and stuff in the breaks between verse and chorus. Then you can add canned loops in the break out sections or over the basic pattern for variety. The canned loops you add can be anything other than kick and snare patters for variety.

    Ars
    Some sound advice. Maybe I could just make some drum/precussion giga templates and some beats as midi, save them all in the same folder and wait till I know the tempo of my projects before doing the wave thing.

    Anyone else got a favorite method for saving time on tedious drum work?

    Thanks,
    Belbin

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