• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Topic: Opus vs. GOS - slow, expressive performance

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Opus vs. GOS - slow, expressive performance

    I got a few requests for this type of piece. So here it is.

    http://www.samhulick.com/misc/UntitledBbMin_GOS.mp3
    http://www.samhulick.com/misc/UntitledBbMin_Opus.mp3
    http://www.samhulick.com/misc/Untitl...us_Sordino.mp3

    No legato used, it would've made the interals too abrupt.. just regular sus. strings did the trick for this piece. I won't reveal my favorite just yet, I'd like to see what everyone else thinks.

    EDIT: One more.. this is Opus (2nd violins sordino, violas sordino, cellos sordino, bass pizz), and GOS (1st violins grand sustain, octave above the 2nd violins).
    http://www.samhulick.com/misc/UntitledBbMin_Mix.mp3
    This one sounds a little odd in the beginning.. I tried to simulate the bows changing direction by dropping the mod wheel quickly for a split second.. it didn't quite work out
    Sam Hulick
    Composer
    http://www.samhulick.com/

  2. #2

    Re: Opus vs. GOS - slow, expressive performance

    The middle one sounds the most natural. GOS omits a strange rather harsh frequency. The muted strings sound a bit synthy.

  3. #3

    Re: Opus vs. GOS - slow, expressive performance

    Interesting. I actually had a hard time deciding.. the sordinos had an interesting tone to them. But GOS sounded the richest. The Opus strings sounded a bit lacking, sorta lifeless.

    I came up with this as the happy middle ground: GOS for violins and violas, Opus for cellos and bass pizzicato, and the final audio run through my mastering process. The end result:

    http://www.samhulick.com/misc/UntitledBbMin.mp3

    I also touched up the dynamics a lot. It should sound a little more realistic as far as a string piece goes.
    Sam Hulick
    Composer
    http://www.samhulick.com/

  4. #4

    Re: Opus vs. GOS - slow, expressive performance

    Your final version sounds pretty good. You've already found what has seemed the single greatest drawback to the vsl libraries: too great disparity between dynamic layers, too great change of timbre or placement of sound. One way to minimize that is to move away from the instruments with velocity layers, and to be explicit when you want to change timbre by using a keyswitch, modwheel, or simply break out each dynamic layer into individual programs.

    With the GOS, the richness of violin articulations is very special, and don't be fooled by "first violin" "second violin", since some of the articulations nominally in each group are distinctive and needed for full realization of some string lines.

    Imo, the GOS violas are a sad different story, far out of tune and limited in articulations. But most of the samples can be tuned (with lots of time), except those where the ensemble was simply not playing the same note.

    As a composition the viola line bothered me a little, sticking out a bit, different in motive, different in gesture, and breaking the expectation somehow repeatedly. More motion, more notes in that line might work, perhaps.

  5. #5

    Re: Opus vs. GOS - slow, expressive performance

    Quote Originally Posted by MDesigner
    Interesting. I actually had a hard time deciding.. the sordinos had an interesting tone to them. But GOS sounded the richest. The Opus strings sounded a bit lacking, sorta lifeless.
    This is where I felt differently. To me the Opus strings had more detail. The GOS (I do own both too) is rather harsh at times and the vibrato can be overboard on one patch and just fine the next.

    Quote Originally Posted by gugliel
    You've already found what has seemed the single greatest drawback to the vsl libraries: too great disparity between dynamic layers, too great change of timbre or placement of sound.
    You got that right. I have gotten used to it but it is somewhat difficult to control.
    Chris

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Nashville
    Posts
    389

    Re: Opus vs. GOS - slow, expressive performance

    Quote Originally Posted by MDesigner
    Interesting. I actually had a hard time deciding.. the sordinos had an interesting tone to them. But GOS sounded the richest. The Opus strings sounded a bit lacking, sorta lifeless.
    Again, I agree with you on this Sam. Even though I totally hear the "detail" that Chris mentioned as his reason for favoring Opus, I guess for me, this falls into one of those situations where sometimes detail detracts from the intended mood. At least, that's how I perceived it.

    GOS, after all this time, still has some wonderfully endearing qualities to it. I certainly would consider "Slow, expressive performances" to be one of them.

  7. #7

    Re: Opus vs. GOS - slow, expressive performance

    My humble opinion,

    The GOS version is deeper and thicker, closer to the sadness emotion. The Opus version do not break the wall. The hybrid version is even worst, highlighting the artificial effect.

    SergeD

  8. #8

    Re: Opus vs. GOS - slow, expressive performance

    Sam,
    Please clear out your PM storage. It says you are full.
    Chris

  9. #9

    Re: Opus vs. GOS - slow, expressive performance

    Quote Originally Posted by gugliel
    Imo, the GOS violas are a sad different story, far out of tune and limited in articulations. But most of the samples can be tuned (with lots of time), except those where the ensemble was simply not playing the same note.
    Far out of tune viola section - isn't that just the ultimate in sampling realism?

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •