• Register
  • Help
Page 1 of 5 1234 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 41

Topic: Which is the EASIEST Orchestral Sample Library to Use?

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Which is the EASIEST Orchestral Sample Library to Use?

    Hi everyone!

    I know that is a pretty broad question, but I am trying to find a library that I can use easily. I am not a professional film scorer, nor do I intend to engage in complex midi orchestration. However, I am looking for realistic samples (and thus have decided to spend a little more than say simply use SampleTank orchestra sounds). I am a singer-songwriter and am likely to use orchestral sounds fairly sparingly in the arrangements, but I would like them to be realistic.

    I actually bought EWQL Gold during the Dec/Jan group buy but still haven't installed it in my computer as I am going to get a new one soon and did not need to use Gold for the past 6 months. And frankly I wonder if I'll ever want to use sweeping Hollywood-sounding samples in my songs! I just couldn't resist the group buy.

    Reading the Gold manual and getting into a headache with key-switching in Kompakt (I also have Kontakt), I was wondering if something like the Miroslav Philharmonik might actually be more user-friendly, since it is all in one dedicated engine. Or perhaps the new Motu Symphonic Instrument. Do experienced users here think they would be easier to use? The GPO ensemble builder looks tempting for my purposes (I don't need a 40 piece orchestra) but again it uses Kontakt.

    The idea is (if recommended) to sell my copy of EWQL Gold and get the Miroslav or Motu if it makes sense.

    Any opinions would be welcome and appreciated.

    Many thanks in advance!

    Len
    www.lenmusic.com

  2. #2

    Re: Which is the EASIEST Orchestral Sample Library to Use?

    I would keep your eye out on AMP:

    http://fx-max.com/amp.html

    For those of us who have trouble tinkering with articulations for hours on end

    I can't help but recommend Garritan Personal Orchestra. It's easy to use, has a solid amount of articulations, ensemble-building, plus expressive control so that you can make your own articulations.
    Zircon Studios - Original music for media, electronica, sound design, and synthesis.

  3. #3

    Re: Which is the EASIEST Orchestral Sample Library to Use?

    Well and you're eyes will roll with this one... They all have strengths and weaknesses. Sometimes its about ease, sometimes its about how it fits into your normal workflow, sometimes you need this, sometimes that. That's why there are so many of these and so many people that own multiple products. They all bring something different, offer something different, and all have their own character. Here's a rundown from my perspective...

    GPO is a small footprint library that has been well laid out and has consistent programmer and keyswitching. The sounds are intimate for the most part, but you'd be surprised at the orchestration possible with it. There are some missing articulations here but that looks to be remedied with the release of GPO Advanced which will have an upgrade price from the first release. The idea behind this product was simplicity and ease of use while keeping it musical and expressive and I think it has that. Its very approachable on a level that can be understood by users just getting into the sample world. By liberal use of modulation and velocity (attack) control, the user can build very lyrical passages. I love the GPO woodwinds and the solo strings are nice as well. The ensemble building is a great feature that I would like to see more of (although sometimes I still want for pre-built ensembles for quick and dirty work.) I still don't think there's a better investment out there for someone with 250 dollars and an itching to make music.

    Gold is very complex, therefor the keyswitching is complex as well. The mapping with the keyswitches isn't consistent across the board and due to the complexity of the product some instruments contain very specific programming. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, however, it takes some forthought on the users part. There are a lot of articulations here and that is a plus. The sound is also ambient, but not to the point where you would have difficulty mixing and matching it with other products. I still think it has a grander sound than say VSL, but I've also heard very convincing small works as well. One thing I'm not fond of is some of the woodwind instruments. They just seem overly forceful and limit their usefulness for me. But that's all relative of course. There's a price you pay with a product of this complexity and that price is a learning curve. Its not insurmountable, by any means, but does take some time.

    The upcoming Miroslav product looks to forgo the use of keyswitching altogether and use midi controller switching instead. There are advantages to this since for some users the process will be easier since it won't require notes here and there in the piano roll or unnecessary expressions in a score. The product hasn't been released yet, but looks well thought out. There seem to be ample presets with different sounds and programming so that most users will be able to quickly find a patch that will suite their needs best. From what I've heard of it, either online or in person, the library more than meets the standard of what I'd expect from a product in its range. It does have a distinct character all its own (which is refreshing.)

    I can't really comment on MOTU since its just coming to light for the most part.

    There's nothing wrong with the Kontakt engine. Each can be considered a dedicated product since you don't ever have to load it into Kontakt if you don't want to. I rarely load GPO into Kontakt for instance. Its much easier in my work flow to use it in the player. I like the layout of the Philharmonik. It just looks cool too. I don't know about MOTU's. I'm not sure I like how it looks (I'm a very visual person.) It looks bloated and complex, but maybe that's a wrong assumption that will be proven as such when the product debuts.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    5,755

    Re: Which is the EASIEST Orchestral Sample Library to Use?

    For the uses you describe, I think any of the libraries would be easy. The only difficulty, really, is in trying to very accurately mock the sound of a seated orchestra. If you're using it as essentially an orchestral texture for pads in pop tunes, I think you'll find that almost all of them are quite manageable, and work very well for the purpose.

  5. #5

    Re: Which is the EASIEST Orchestral Sample Library to Use?

    The idea is (if recommended) to sell my copy of EWQL Gold and get the Miroslav or Motu if it makes sense.
    I didn't think that one could legally re-sell Gold. Am I mistaken?

  6. #6

    Re: Which is the EASIEST Orchestral Sample Library to Use?

    I didn't think that one could legally re-sell Gold. Am I mistaken?
    Oops - maybe I'd better go check if I can do this! I haven't even opened the CD yet or registered it, so hopefully EWQL will allow me to do it!

    As for the other helpful (esp. Joseph's) answers - thank you. I am not going to be using the orch samples for just pad sounds, so articulation switching will still be needed for me. At the moment it looks like Miroslav may be the easiest to use, but that automatic key switching thing which is going to come out soon also sounds fab!

  7. #7

    Re: Which is the EASIEST Orchestral Sample Library to Use?

    Oops - maybe I'd better go check if I can do this! I haven't even opened the CD yet or registered it, so hopefully EWQL will allow me to do it!
    Len,

    Let me know what you find out, as I'm in a similar situation. Thanks.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    5,755

    Re: Which is the EASIEST Orchestral Sample Library to Use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Len
    Oops - maybe I'd better go check if I can do this! I haven't even opened the CD yet or registered it, so hopefully EWQL will allow me to do it!

    As for the other helpful (esp. Joseph's) answers - thank you. I am not going to be using the orch samples for just pad sounds, so articulation switching will still be needed for me. At the moment it looks like Miroslav may be the easiest to use, but that automatic key switching thing which is going to come out soon also sounds fab!
    Could you describe how you plan to use the samples? The reason I ask is that I would definitely make different recommendations for different end uses.

    For instance, if you were going to be using them to construct solo lines, like, say, a solo cello line, I would recommend the VSL Legato instruments (perhaps one of the Horizon libraries) for that purpose, over one of the products designed more to mock up a full orchestra.

    If it were going to be more like "lush orchestral textures" I'd probably say Sonic Implants, Miroslav, VSL Ensembles, EastWest, etc.

    I would consider "easiest" a very relative term, becuase if a sample library is easy to play, it still might be very hard to get, say, an acceptably realistic solo line. So, is the more detailed articulation harder, or is it in fact easier, because a realistic result might take less time--even if it is more complicated to achieve?

    The glut of products on the market, all strong in their own ways, makes it all but impossible to offer simple answers any more. So, the kinds of musical situations and end uses you envision are the very best clues you can offer up, to get good recommendations.

  9. #9
    Senior Member newmewzikboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    1,700

    Re: Which is the EASIEST Orchestral Sample Library to Use?

    What are our options anyway?

    VSL
    GPO
    GOS
    SI
    EWQLSO
    Mira
    KHunter

    what else did I miss? Lets get a full list again...

  10. #10

    Re: Which is the EASIEST Orchestral Sample Library to Use?

    Very true Bruce which is why hunts for options turns into a personal struggle to figure out which suits you as an end user the best.

    Its hard to gauge someones aptitude as well as their ability to use a product therefor it begs the question of, 'is anyone qualified to recommend a product to another person.' I have no idea.

    My greatest advice is to contact the users for information about how the product works, listen to the demos, learn about the programming either from the forum here or ask the developer/programmer directly, and decide which one will suit your needs best.

    Its a toss up and I still feel like you'd end up with more than one product in the end.

Go Back to forum
Page 1 of 5 1234 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •