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Topic: Sibelius: Valse triste - by GigaLove

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  1. #1

    Sibelius: Valse triste - by GigaLove

    Probably one of the best melodies that has ever been written.

    Done with the GPO and SIR delivering the acoustics.

    http://home.arcor.de/captor/ValseTriste_v6.mp3

    Greetings to Finland and all others who like that stuff!


  2. #2

    Re: Sibelius: Valse triste

    GigaLove,

    Very expressive and haunting. Far too short though. Were the strings G.O.S.?

    Karl

  3. #3

    Re: Sibelius: Valse triste

    thanks for listenig karl! gos? no...it's all...well 99% gpo. just a wee of silver added to give the accompanying strings a little different colour.


  4. #4

    Re: Sibelius: Valse triste

    Very nice!

    Which IR did you use?

    /Mats

  5. #5

    Re: Sibelius: Valse triste

    Quote Originally Posted by Tangram
    Very nice!

    Which IR did you use?

    /Mats
    hey Tangram...glad ya like

    which IR?

    this one...the first on this page...a 1200 seat hall:

    http://noisevault.com/index.php?opti...lectcat&cat=17

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Re: Sibelius: Valse triste

    Quote Originally Posted by GigaLove
    Probably one of the best melodies that has ever been written.

    Done with the GPO and SIR delivering the acoustics.

    http://home.arcor.de/captor/ValseTriste_v6.mp3

    Greetings to Finland and all others who like that stuff!

    Thanks Gigastudio. Sibelius is one of my favourite composers and I particularly like 'At the Castle Gates' from Pelias and Melisande, which was popularised as the signature tune of the well known (in Britain) 'the Sky at Night' television programme which deals with the latest events in Astronomy and which is hosted by Sir Patrick Moore; an exceedingly devoted amateur astronomer. I do believe it's been running for over 30yrs....yes, he certainly covered the Moon Landing anyway...(This will mean nothing to all of you ...but hey, I don't care!)

    Anyway, back to the piece. You have made a very good mockup of this IMHO. It is such a clever piece....I wonder if he hadn't have done this perhaps someone else would.

    I'm very pleased that you did the composition and GPO justice with this and REALLY captured the essence and flavour.

    Frank

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
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    Brooklyn, NY
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    Re: Sibelius: Valse triste

    More, please!

    I hope you plan on going further with this

  8. #8

    Re: Sibelius: Valse triste

    @ Hardy Heern: thanks for ur kind feedback, Sir. interesting how you tell about the sibelius music in connection with the spacenight pictures. I also thought that this music tells much about bigger contexts. Had definitely pictures of turning galaxies in front of my eye. I first heard "Valse Triste" in a TV commercial for a classical radio station. they were playing excerpts of several big classical pieces while the camera was flying over homespun row houses....big white laundry sheets moved gentle by the wind in front of these houses. these pictures and the mood were perfectly fitting...normally orchestral/classical music in movies is more shown in context with candelabrums...old impressive castles and that all stuff etc...but that synthesis of the rather sad but honest world of the working man in connection with big music gave these pictures a deeper meaning of the ambivalent tragical human existence. [yes...and sure this commercial wanted to show that classical music is reachable for everyone.] At that point of time I had no idea who wrote this melody...it only touched me deeply and for this piece I knew why I love string bodies playing big melodies with lots of half-tone progressions going on. not until this year as I did some research about Sibelius I recognized that this melody was from Sibelius....and thought...yea...no wonder...these northern composers (also grieg) have this big warm melancholy. well well...blabla...hope this doesn't bore you...
    ps. could you perhaps post a short excerpt of 'At the Castle Gates' ? ( I think under 50 sec mp3 excerpts are legal)

    @loogoo: glad ya like it! dunno if i have the time to extend this...but I'll keep it definitely on my mind!

    greetings

  9. #9
    Senior Member
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    UK- teeming with life....
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    Re: Sibelius: Valse triste

    Quote Originally Posted by GigaLove
    @ Hardy Heern: thanks for ur kind feedback, Sir. interesting how you tell about the sibelius music in connection with the spacenight pictures. I also thought that this music tells much about bigger contexts. Had definitely pictures of turning galaxies in front of my eye. I first heard "Valse Triste" in a TV commercial for a classical radio station. they were playing excerpts of several big classical pieces while the camera was flying over homespun row houses....big white laundry sheets moved gentle by the wind in front of these houses. these pictures and the mood were perfectly fitting...normally orchestral/classical music in movies is more shown in context with candelabrums...old impressive castles and that all stuff etc...but that synthesis of the rather sad but honest world of the working man in connection with big music gave these pictures a deeper meaning of the ambivalent tragical human existence. [yes...and sure this commercial wanted to show that classical music is reachable for everyone.] At that point of time I had no idea who wrote this melody...it only touched me deeply and for this piece I knew why I love string bodies playing big melodies with lots of half-tone progressions going on. not until this year as I did some research about Sibelius I recognized that this melody was from Sibelius....and thought...yea...no wonder...these northern composers (also grieg) have this big warm melancholy. well well...blabla...hope this doesn't bore you...
    ps. could you perhaps post a short excerpt of 'At the Castle Gates' ? ( I think under 50 sec mp3 excerpts are legal)

    @loogoo: glad ya like it! dunno if i have the time to extend this...but I'll keep it definitely on my mind!

    greetings
    Giga,... love your enthusiasm. Isn't it great when you discover a piece of music you haven't heard before! The valse triste and the likes of the dance macabre are interesting. There isn't too much room for similar pieces that's why I wonder if Sibelius didn't get there first how might another composer have treated a sad waltz? You make some thoughtful points. I'm Scottish by birth and like, I believe, the Scandinavian and Nordic races we have a melancholic streak. I'm a sucker for a sad and sentimental song....no doubt. BTW. please don't call me Sir!!, as I say I'm a Scot and have little time for show or titles....(I wouldn't even sit comfortably with the forum stars!!)

    If you go here you can download a (unfortunately Real Audio) file so that you can hear the piece. My spelling was wrong, the theme is Pelleas And Melisande (probably the best, or perhaps only decent piece of music in the entire opera...you know how it goes!) is the first part of the the suite. There's loads of stuff on the web. The real audio file has the virtue of being small but perhaps not the best sounding. I don't keep Real Audio on my system anymore so looked for an MP3 version which is further down this post.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/space/s...arymedia.shtml

    I must admit to having spent a fair old time on the Internet browsing looking for a sample MP3 of this piece. It just supports my view that all the music ever needed for a lifetime has already been written. I listened to snatches of all sorts whilst searching. Debussy and Faure also did a Pelleas And Melisande. Seemingly Pelleas and Melisande are Greek mythological characters.

    Listening to snippets of various pieces (the tower record site was useful for this) make one realise just how much music has been written....I shall certainly not be able to listen to it all and also much gets lost over time. It was interesting to hear how much 'cross fertilisation' ( ) there is; for example, I heard a section of Debussy a piece which sounded like it was lifted from one of the Star Wars themes....instrumentation and all.

    An MP3 of 'At the castle gates' is no 5 on the following page....just about long enough to give you a good feel for it. You need to scroll down the page to hear the sample MP3s.

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...898807-8854311

    I also bumped into a much loved piece Gluck Orphée et Eurydice (Orpheus and Eurydice): Dance of the Blessed Spirits. Try also to listen to Kathleen Ferrier singing Gluck's Orpheus and Eurydice Orpheus's Aria 'What is life to me, without thee, what is life if thou art dead' (catchy lyrics I think you'll agree!) perhaps one of the saddest and most beautiful songs ever written and one of my personal favourites which goes ideally with a 'hot toddy'!. Get the hanky ready!

    Sorry to rabbit on about personal taste/choice but my browsing just reminded me!

    I hope some of this is helpful.

    cheers

    frank

  10. #10

    Re: Sibelius: Valse triste

    hey frank....sorry for my late reply (was offline during the weekend)

    nevermind because of my "Sir"....I just like to use that thing from time to time to express my respect. In the next sentence I might use something like "dude" again.

    thanks for your research and the links! the tune that you've mentioned is definitely tasty! and I see that I have to do lots of more research about Sibelius and ...have to try to find it in better audio quality...and ....Orpheus and Eurydice. my hankerchiefs ready....haha...

    once again thanks for your input!

    scandinavian composers rock!

    cheers

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