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Topic: EIS?

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  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Castle Rock, Colorado
    Posts
    699

    EIS?

    Will there be any representatives/instructors here from Lyle Murphy's Equal Interval System? A little off the beaten path but nonetheless valid as well, since it is being taught in some colleges from what I've heard.

    www.equalinterval.com

    Peace,

    Frederick

  2. #2

    Re: EIS?

    Not a bad idea Frederick. This teaching style is very interesting and is gaining momentum. I'm not aware of any instructors using this method at present, but its something to look into.

  3. #3

    Re: EIS?

    Hey Hey hey!

    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick
    Will there be any representatives/instructors here from Lyle Murphy's Equal Interval System?
    I just checked the list of graduates and our own Craig Sharmat is listed.

    Sincerley,

    Jonathan

  4. #4
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    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Orcas Island
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    11,454

    Re: EIS?

    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick
    Will there be any representatives/instructors here from Lyle Murphy's Equal Interval System? A little off the beaten path but nonetheless valid as well, since it is being taught in some colleges from what I've heard.

    www.equalinterval.com

    Peace,

    Frederick
    Excellent suggestion Frederick. I think it would be a good idea to have an instructor for Lyle Murphy's Equal Interval System. Anyone you can think of?

    Gary Garritan

  5. #5

    Re: EIS?

    Well I just got through listening to ALL the demos at the site. I think I like the jazz stuff better than the orchestration BUT the orchestration is pretty tight.

    Not only is Craig there with a testimonial, I found a lot of composers writing for animation I watch on tv now. I loved the power puff girls, and Dexter, and Star Wars Clone Wars. Well the composers for those programs are all EIS grads!

    Makes me think EIS course $300 + GPO $250. Some knowledge and tools! Might pass the time while I consider a day job and grad school.

    Sincerely,

    Jonathan

  6. #6

    Re: EIS?

    I'm glad Craig, Frederick, and others are spreading the word on Spud Murphy. Spud is a remarkable guy with a fascinating slant on music theory. I personally find the results (as evidenced by Spud's and his students' music) extremely attractive. I hope EIS will be represented in some form here.

    Tom

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    366

    Re: EIS?

    If the audio samples posted at the site are any indication of what this system will turn you into, I'd recommend keeping as far away from it as you possibly can. Yet another gimmicky "system" of dubious merit. Just what the world needed.

  8. #8

    Re: EIS?

    Well Scott,

    To each his own, of course, but to dismiss an approach that appears to have contributed to such disparate examples as Mary Ekler’s gorgeous re-harmonizations, Craig Sharmat’s intricate and harmonically fascinating (to me at least) arrangements, Bennie Maupin’s high quality – as always - jazz, and Tim Torrance’s clever and fun Officer Gadget is rather . . . sweeping. That’s a lot of territory. Whatever, I would encourage people to investigate further if they hear things of interest to them in the examples above and others. If not, they should look elsewhere. This is another choice among many. I just happen to like what I hear in much of this. As nearly always, it comes down to nothing more than personal preference – not an absolute in sight.

    Tom

    P.S. Thanks Sharmy, for generously offering to answer questions as they arise. I hope anyone interested takes the opportunity to ask. Sharmy is well-versed in EIS (something I’m not) and would be a great source of information.

  9. #9

    Re: EIS?

    No system should be used as the sole means of composition. So I partially agree with Scott. But, it could be another tool. I will say that there are no short cuts in music. If one wants to be a great composer there is no way around doing the hard work, studying scores, scales, orchestration books galore, college (or conservatory or even just private tutoring). Remember, if it is too good to be true, it probably is too good to be true.
    Jess Hendricks
    DMA Student and Teaching Asst in Music Theory/ Composition at the University of Miami
    Personal Website

  10. #10

    Re: EIS?

    I see where Scott is coming from BUT I do feel there's some variety in the writing. Like I said a lot of the animation I do enjoy on cartoon network is written by folks who seem versed in this method.

    Now, I'm a vain music film fashion victim and I IMDB a lot of those folks and I was very impressed.

    Jess, you my man, and I agree that as with other crafts and arts that: 'There are no short cuts.' But I don't think this is a short cut. I mean somewhere on the site it said it takes about 2 years to do all the stuff.

    Also, and Craig says this, sounds like alot of people already had lots of playing experience and a degree before studying this method. I don't see anything that says no need to know music.

    I mean, I want to study the string quartet course that pete offers at his web site. It's a method and an approach. Funny, just last night I was at home trying to find a Bach piece from Well Tempered Clavier and off my shelf fell some Old Suzuki method books, and a Hannon, and Kodali(?). All methods to start and train someone in piano proficiency. A method.

    Also, the theory being expressed reminds me of something a theory teacher I had in college did. His background was big band arranging and he used what he called 'Miracle Voicings?'

    Sincerely,

    Jonathan

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