• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Topic: Tom's Pipe Organ Timbre Variations Tutorial

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Tom's Pipe Organ Timbre Variations Tutorial

    Even though I've taken many opportunities to point out the tonal variation features that I added to the last GPO Update I'm still not convinced that these features have been well-understood. So, I've created a brief tutorial that should clarify the tonal possibilities afforded by these new features. When applied properly, the effect of these new controllers can vary from extremely subtle to quite dramatic. The Update documentation gave the basic information on page 17. Here's a reprint:
    ---------------------------------
    Three controls have been added to the pipe organ instruments to increase the tonal possibilities. These instruments load by default as they always have. The new controllers are:

    cc20 = control of fundamental strength (rather like the bass drum fundamental control). This is especially useful for the pedal instruments. One exception: Scharf4 - no real fundamental is present in this instrument (it is intended only for layering).
    cc22 = control of the filter strength (FILTLV). Used in conjunction with cc23.
    cc23 = control of the center frequency of the filter (FILTFQ). With cc22 set to a modest or higher level, cc23 can be used to change the character of the instrument.
    ------------------------------------------

    For this tutorial I've prepared three examples. Each has a screenshot from CubaseSX to show the use of the controllers graphically; a standard MIDI file of the data; and an MP3 file of the exported audio (recorded dry.) The screenshot displays the piano roll view of the data with aligned velocity, mod wheel (cc1), cc20, cc22, and cc23 data below. Notice that changes in values for cc20, cc22, and cc23 are applied in discreet steps to better simulate the addition (or subtraction) of specific stops. The actual amount chosen by the user depends on many things. I've only picked values that make the discreet steps clear. I've chosen some contrasting value settings for these examples but there are an almost unlimited selection of combinations and gradations available. The ones I have chosen help illustrate how a single patch can be modified to have quite a variety of tonal qualities when using the new controllers. In each example I use a series of notes repeated 3 or 4 times for comparison purposes. Each occurrence of the series has different controller settings which create different tonal characteristics. One caveat: The third example using the pedal contains very strong low frequency energy that could harm your speakers if you try to play it too loud. Use caution.

    The first example uses the "Cornet" stop of the GPO pipe organ. On this one I chose to use cc1, cc22, and cc23. I use cc1 to slightly increase the volume of the note series with each repetition. The first series sets cc22 and cc23 to zero and, thus, has no affect on the timbre. This is the neutral position. The second series adds approximately a half strength cc22. The setting of cc23 attenuates the higher frequencies - as you lower the values you lower the center frequency - this one uses a moderately high value. The third series increases the cc22 strength to maximum and lowers the center frequency setting of cc23. The fourth series retains the maximum cc22 strength but lowers the center frequency to its minimum setting. These four combinations yield striking contrasts of timbre - all using the same patch. Links:

    http://www.garritan.com/tutorial/Org...ial/Cornet.mp3
    http://www.garritan.com/tutorial/Org...ial/Cornet.mid
    http://www.garritan.com/tutorial/Org...ial/Cornet.jpg

    The second example uses the "Symphonic Plenum" stop. This one employs cc1, cc20, cc22, and cc23. A single cc1 value is used throughout. The first series use the neutral zero settings for cc20, cc22 and cc23. The second series uses the maximum strength setting for cc22 and a moderately high setting for cc23. The third series retains the maximum setting for cc22 but uses a rather low setting for cc23. The fourth series adds a moderately high setting for cc20 to strengthen the fundamental but drops the value of cc22 to zero (neutral.) Note that it was unnecessary to lower the value of cc23 to zero since it has no effect when cc22 is set to zero strength. Links:

    http://www.garritan.com/tutorial/Org...onicPlenum.mp3
    http://www.garritan.com/tutorial/Org...onicPlenum.mid
    http://www.garritan.com/tutorial/Org...onicPlenum.jpg

    The final example uses the "Baroque Plen Reed Pedal" stop. The three series of notes exhibit progressively greater fundamental strength (cc20) while, at the same time, showing very different choices of timbre. The first and second series use maximum cc22 strength. The first series uses a moderate setting for cc23. The second series uses a low setting for cc23. The third series zeros both controllers (but remember, only cc22 actually needed to be set to zero to eliminate the effect of the two controllers.) This third series strengthens the fundamental to its maximum setting. Links:

    http://www.garritan.com/tutorial/Org...nReedPedal.mp3
    http://www.garritan.com/tutorial/Org...nReedPedal.mid
    http://www.garritan.com/tutorial/Org...nReedPedal.jpg

    You should now see the potential of using these controllers to greatly expand the available palette of sounds. I have shown three examples that demonstrate some of the possibilities when using single GPO pipe organ patches, but these stops can, of course, be combined for an even larger group of possibilities. Not only can different settings for different stops be combined with one another, careful adjustment of relative levels between patches can also help modify the perceived timbres.

    The addition of these controllers is not meant to fill the need for future additional stops for the GPO organ(s) but it is a very real supplement for the organ as it now exists. Don't overlook this new resource.

    Tom

  2. #2

    Re: Tom's Pipe Organ Timbre Variations Tutorial

    Exactly what is a filter?
    Isn't that when the eq curve sharply dips down for a certain range of frequencies?
    So cc22 controlls how deep the dip is and cc23 controlls where the dip is. Am I understanding this correctly?

    I'm just trying to understand this whole concept. I never really took a good look at this tutorial untill I actually started taking organ lessons, so now I must know MORE!!!

    -Chris

  3. #3

    Re: Tom's Pipe Organ Timbre Variations Tutorial

    Quote Originally Posted by cptexas
    Exactly what is a filter?
    Isn't that when the eq curve sharply dips down for a certain range of frequencies?
    So cc22 controlls how deep the dip is and cc23 controlls where the dip is. Am I understanding this correctly?
    Correct. These controls use parametric EQ to modify the timbre of the stops over a useful range.

    Tom

  4. #4

    Re: Tom's Pipe Organ Timbre Variations Tutorial

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hopkins
    Correct. These controls use parametric EQ to modify the timbre of the stops over a useful range.

    Tom
    Ahh. I see!

    Thanks for the clarification!

    -Chris

  5. #5

    Re: Tom's Pipe Organ Timbre Variations Tutorial

    I know it's only 8 years later, but are the links in this tutorial available anywhere? None of them are found on www.garritan.com anymore.
    Thank you,
    Stevan

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •