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Topic: And Light Upon Them

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  1. #1

    And Light Upon Them

    I'd begun a post earlier on this, with the intention of just trying out a movement or two... but subsequently got the whole piece together. Sorry for the double post; but here, now, is the full sonata:

    Piano Sonata #7
    "And Light Upon Them"
    David Sosnowski

    Movement #1 - 'Wilderness of Thought'
    Movement #2 - 'Diverging Principles'
    Movement #3 - 'Providence Speaks'
    Movement #4 - 'Celebrating Clarity'
    Movement #5 - 'Undiscovered Truths'

    This is largely in a rather terse "modern" idiom; not for everyone, surely... but it does give the GPO piano a fairly good work-out -- though I'm certain my inexperience with the GPO prevents me from showing it at its absolute best.

    Best,

    etLux
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  2. #2

    Re: And Light Upon Them

    I will listen to this as soon as I get home from work.

    BTW, I like your naming system. Normally I just give it the standard names (i.e. Sonata, Rondeau, etc.) but this works for me. The names are very ambiguous which doesn't seem to give the listener any preconceived notions. Bravo! I look forward to listening to your sonata.
    Jess Hendricks
    DMA Student and Teaching Asst in Music Theory/ Composition at the University of Miami
    Personal Website

  3. #3
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Unhappy Re: And Light Upon Them

    Drat! I get a error message "Could not be found please check the link and try again". Will try later tonight.
    Styxx

  4. #4

    Re: And Light Upon Them

    Well Done david.It is an epic work which must have taken ages to produce.
    I love the way you get hold of a phrase and "wear it out" .Much like Beethoven used to do.Although clearly it is the shade of Bach that haunts this piece.
    What I find strange and interesting,is that it is the more tonal passages that sound the most tense,rather than the more acerbic "modern" passages.A very neat trick,(How the hell do you do that )
    It would be nice to know more about the background to this piece,it feels like a grand philosophical argument,but it would perhaps be "enlightening" to know more about the subject matter of the debate.
    Congratulations on a huge accomplishment.
    regards

  5. #5

    Re: And Light Upon Them

    Quote Originally Posted by joaz
    Well Done david.It is an epic work which must have taken ages to produce.
    I love the way you get hold of a phrase and "wear it out" .Much like Beethoven used to do.Although clearly it is the shade of Bach that haunts this piece.
    What I find strange and interesting,is that it is the more tonal passages that sound the most tense,rather than the more acerbic "modern" passages.A very neat trick,(How the hell do you do that )
    It would be nice to know more about the background to this piece,it feels like a grand philosophical argument,but it would perhaps be "enlightening" to know more about the subject matter of the debate.
    Congratulations on a huge accomplishment.
    regards
    There's a lot of Classical, Romantic, and especially Baroque period influence on this piece. (There are also frequent "references" to various Masters, including a virtually literal lift of a Bach invention as a substantive thematic element in the third movement - Providence Speaks.)

    It is becoming usual for your perception to surprise me, Joaz. This work is indeed a philosophical statement with a broadly overarching "back story" to it.

    I have added a NARRATIVE to the listing for And Light Upon Them which explores this in more detail; but in brief, it is a look at where humanity is now, and a possible future for which I hope.

    etLux
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  6. #6

    Thumbs up Re: And Light Upon Them

    It's a concert piece.

    My opinion is that this kind of music is accessible to a large base of people, even if rich in structure and cultural background.

    Personally I don't like the music that only has an esoteric structure, but breaking rules of euphony and dynamics (rhythmic and melodic), it is really better on the paper than playing.

    Unfortunately a lot of European masters and professors seems to appreciate pupils only if they write atonal strongly noisy and dissonant music, with so irregular rhythm that you can confuse it with a random sequence of free training and tuning runs and sounds of the single performers...

    I wrote a lot of this music in Conservatorio, just to be accepted. After degree, as a reaction, I wrote only tonal, classic style and pop music.

    Now I feel better. I will write some more modern music, finally free of forced request, just following my taste, as you did very well.

    My personal appreciation, David.

  7. #7

    Re: And Light Upon Them

    Quote Originally Posted by Fabio
    It's a concert piece.

    My opinion is that this kind of music is accessible to a large base of people, even if rich in structure and cultural background.

    Personally I don't like the music that only has an esoteric structure, but breaking rules of euphony and dynamics (rhythmic and melodic), it is really better on the paper than playing.

    Unfortunately a lot of European masters and professors seems to appreciate pupils only if they write atonal strongly noisy and dissonant music, with so irregular rhythm that you can confuse it with a random sequence of free training and tuning runs and sounds of the single performers...

    I wrote a lot of this music in Conservatorio, just to be accepted. After degree, as a reaction, I wrote only tonal, classic style and pop music.

    Now I feel better. I will write some more modern music, finally free of forced request, just following my taste, as you did very well.

    My personal appreciation, David.
    Thank you, Fabio -- we agree deeply on many things, in this regard.

    In conservatory, one of my professors said many years ago that one should "write with one's own voice."

    And I doubt too many of us have the voice of a random sequencer... lol.

    etLux
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  8. #8

    Re: And Light Upon Them

    Quote Originally Posted by Fabio
    It's a concert piece.

    My opinion is that this kind of music is accessible to a large base of people, even if rich in structure and cultural background.

    Personally I don't like the music that only has an esoteric structure, but breaking rules of euphony and dynamics (rhythmic and melodic), it is really better on the paper than playing.

    Unfortunately a lot of European masters and professors seems to appreciate pupils only if they write atonal strongly noisy and dissonant music, with so irregular rhythm that you can confuse it with a random sequence of free training and tuning runs and sounds of the single performers...

    I wrote a lot of this music in Conservatorio, just to be accepted. After degree, as a reaction, I wrote only tonal, classic style and pop music.

    Now I feel better. I will write some more modern music, finally free of forced request, just following my taste, as you did very well.

    My personal appreciation, David.

    I also agree on a lot of what you say. Universities here in the US are the same. But I do see one good thing about this training. When most young composers get to University, they are writing like Mozart. The professor snaps them out of that really quickly by forcing them to write atonal, serialist, etc. Then when we get out on our own, our music is much more well rounded. We learn to think more "out of the box".

    Great piece, BTW. I really like the rhythmic developement.
    Jess Hendricks
    DMA Student and Teaching Asst in Music Theory/ Composition at the University of Miami
    Personal Website

  9. #9

    Thumbs up Re: And Light Upon Them

    Quote Originally Posted by etLux
    There's a lot of Classical, Romantic, and especially Baroque period influence on this piece.
    (I can hear "Rhapsody in Blue"' in Movement #5. It's intentional, isn't it?. Sorry if it's not. )
    Thanks for posting All Movements file. I clicked and forgot I'm not in concert hall. I'm sure a real pianist would have fun playing the piece.
    Loved "rockish" harmonies of 3rd mov. Theme at 2:35 sounds eclectic though.
    LOVED development of 4th mov.
    I suspect you're working on Movement #6 . Somehow the suite doesn't sound complete to me. Just my opinion.
    sfiks

  10. #10
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    Re: And Light Upon Them

    David, I've only had time to listen to the first movement so far, but I like this piece. I'd write more as to why, but haven't the time at the moment.

    Well done.

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