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Topic: 32 bit samples??

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  1. #1

    Question 32 bit samples??

    In the Kontakt player (in whatever mode you happen to be in) under options there is an option that says 'auto convert samples to 32 bit'.
    What does that mean? Does that mean that all of the samples go magicly from 16 bit to 32 bit? Doesn't that mean that the instruments double in size because it double the denseness of information? When I enable this feature my RAM stays the same--it doesn't double.

    I'M CONFUSED!!!!!

    What am I missing here?


    -Chris

  2. #2

    Re: 32 bit samples??

    You are quite right, when activated it doubles the size of the instruments. Don't use it. It is a built-in option in the Kontakt player and has no advantages for GPO users. Keep it de-activated.

    Tom

  3. #3

    Re: 32 bit samples??

    My new Power mac G5 is capable of going to 24 bit sound. I recorded to file a piece (The Sinfonietta) in both 24 and 16 bit. I couldn't tell the difference... even through my nice EV studio monitors.

    The recording industry requires 24 bit masters and I have never understood why because CDs are only 16 bit. I am sure the difference is measureable, just not discernible. Is this perhaps a throw back to the analog days? I guess if the master is 24 bit and printed to 16 bit CDs the sound loss is negligble.

    Kind of off topic, but I have always wondered.
    Jess Hendricks
    DMA Student and Teaching Asst in Music Theory/ Composition at the University of Miami
    Personal Website

  4. #4

    Re: 32 bit samples??

    Well DVD Audio disks are in 24bit sound as well as surround sound. So they have to use the highest quality source.

  5. #5

    Re: 32 bit samples??

    Quote Originally Posted by Heezzi
    Well DVD Audio disks are in 24bit sound as well as surround sound. So they have to use the highest quality source.
    That would certainly be pertinent if source quality was affected by this option but, in the case of GPO, all samples are 16bit and converting them to 32 bit just adds data "space" at the bottom of the dynamic range where no actual sample data exists. 16bit samples are 16bit samples and converting them to 32bit does not increase their resolution. Now, if the samples were 24bit then the 32bit option would have a potential benefit of giving room for the extra sample data. It is my understanding that background processing in the player is already being handled at the higher bit rate (which is really the more significant area - this is where waveform data can suffer "rounding" errors during fractional computations.) In any case, for most users, the efficient use of RAM while minimizing processing power is far more important in realizing complex orchestrations than any (real or, in this particular case, imagined) incremental gain in sample quality. In the case of GPO, these considerations remain the same for any destination format whether CD, DVD Audio, SACD, or any future media. I wonder how many people (among our users) are presently creating product for DVD Audio and/or SACD? Interesting question.

    Tom

  6. #6

    Question Re: 32 bit samples??

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hopkins
    I wonder how many people (among our users) are presently creating product for DVD Audio and/or SACD?
    How do you burn SACDs? Is it just a regular CD with an SACD file on it? Or is it a totally different type of disc? I've been debating weather or not to get an SACD player instead of a CD player being that my current 20-year-old CD player is on the fritz and can barely read CDRs.

    -Chris

  7. #7

    Re: 32 bit samples??

    SACD is a format all to itself. It is dual-layed, one layer for your standard CD player and a second for a SACD player. SACD discs DO NOT work in PCs.

    The SACD format is actually 1-bit, 2.8Mhz audio and is supposed to give the warmth of analog as it works more the way analog does (a more continuous stream of 2,800,000 samples per second over CD's 44,100 per second).

    Analog is infinite samples per second. Its not broken snap-shots like digital. SACD tries to imitate thsi with its DSD format which requires the special player and again will not work in PC drives.
    Alan Lastufka | www.BelaDMedia.com
    Producer/Artistic Design | Content Producer

    20 Things

  8. #8

    Re: 32 bit samples??

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lastufka
    SACD is a format all to itself. It is dual-layed, one layer for your standard CD player and a second for a SACD player. SACD discs DO NOT work in PCs.

    The SACD format is actually 1-bit, 2.8Mhz audio and is supposed to give the warmth of analog as it works more the way analog does (a more continuous stream of 2,800,000 samples per second over CD's 44,100 per second).

    Analog is infinite samples per second. Its not broken snap-shots like digital. SACD tries to imitate thsi with its DSD format which requires the special player and again will not work in PC drives.
    OOOOOOOOH!
    AHHHHHHHHHH!!!!

    Cool stuff!

  9. #9

    Re: 32 bit samples??

    Quote Originally Posted by cptexas
    How do you burn SACDs?
    It isn't easy - or cheap. There is much greater access to affordable software that is capable of burning DVD Audio than SACDs. Not sure why SACD capable software/hardware has been so slow to trickle down to the market but, last time I checked, it was still out of reach in any practical sense. I wouldn't worry about it. Despite the supposed advantages of the 1bit SACD technology, DVD Audio is extremely similar in real-world results and is easily available at reasonable prices. I've listened to both formats at length and have heard no significant difference between them, all other things remaining equal under non-scientifically controlled listening conditions. Both are capable of being used as high-resolution formats. Until I see statistical support for the audible superiority of one over the other (in the form of double blind ABX testing results under strictly controlled scientific conditions) I will let it go at that. The biggest advance of both formats is in their multi-channel capability which you may or may not require.

    Tom

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