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Topic: post tips here

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  1. #1

    post tips here

    Hello, everyone!

    I've been looking through all of the threads and I'm amazed at what and how much you can learn around here! I was thinking, it would be great if a big list of helpful hints and tips for the beginner were all in one convinent location, hence, I'm starting this thread.
    Post all of your helpful hints and tips for the beginner GPO user right here. It doesn't have to be limited to just GPO, but tips for other popular sequencers and GPO working together would be very helpful, too.
    Thanks in advance for your helpfullhinttellingness! (is that a word?)

    Chris

  2. #2

    Thumbs up Re: post tips here

    Great Idea, cptexas!

    Hope there is lots of responce and great Tips ahead!

    Maybe it is also usefull to collect old valuable informations found in previous threads, and place a link to it, for example, just a minute ago, I found something about...

    Wide Crescendo Cymbal Rolls (read first posting in that thread)

  3. #3

    Re: post tips here

    There's a great resource at http://www.vsl.co.at/english/pages/i...few__words.htmClick on the various instrumental groups and explore!! Everything you always wanted to know about the properties of instruments.

  4. #4

    Re: post tips here

    Great sight, Poolman!
    Very informative and informational and, above all, useful!

  5. #5

    Re: post tips here

    See also Artistic Orchestration
    by Alan Belkin
    For J.B. & others new to musical composition, see Ricci Adams' Music Net.
    I have asked this before. Don't any of you real composers have, like, lists of classical chord progressions? For instance, I know how to resolve from Eflat Dim to E Major. And of course I know all of the chords that go with each particular key signature. What are some other cool progressions? Or are those called "cadences"? And don't say I-IV-V, either smartypants.
    What is someone named "cptexas" doing in New Joisy?

  6. #6
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    Re: post tips here

    Rageangel,

    I personally don't know of any "lists" of classical chord changes. And the word classical covers a lot of territory, baroque, romantic, impressionistic, etc. What I'd suggest is find a particular piece of music that interests you, get the sheet music and analyze the harmonic structure yourself. Very often the best way to learn is things learned through self discovery.

    Jeff

  7. #7

    Re: post tips here

    Well, if I have to analyze anything, it shore ain't gonna be Baroque. I learned Bouree in Eminor (after hearing Jethro Tull play it, or is it Bmin?) on classical guitar and it was like every other note had its own chord.
    The last time I tried to read a score for an entire orchestra was in college 30+ years ago. Could I do just as well by looking at piano versions of some of the classics.
    I am aware of the different divisions of classical music, but would you say that "classic" period might be an easier staring part. As I jokingly said, baroque just sounds so difficult.
    Thanks for the suggestions. I do have a score for Tchaikovsky's First Violin Concerto (that I'd always hoped to transcribe for guitar). I guess I can start with that.
    But, I thought there were kind of basic chord progressions. You know how diminished and augmented intervals resolve? I thought there might be some kind of easy theory like that for chords, though maybe more advanced.
    I know my basic theory but little beyond that. I guess I should just open a book and get to work.

  8. #8
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    Re: post tips here

    But, I thought there were kind of basic chord progressions. You know how diminished and augmented intervals resolve? I thought there might be some kind of easy theory like that for chords, though maybe more advanced.
    I know my basic theory but little beyond that. I guess I should just open a book and get to work.[/QUOTE]

    I would suggest getting a book on harmony and studying that. As for classical music composing classical music Rule of Thumb Harmony is not popular. Serial music of the 20th centry(gag) is I guess. And Impressionistic music very popular for film scores really,which doesn't even follow any rules expect the rulesfor that composition. Most music isn't even written in a major or minor scale, but in modes like jazz or whole tone scale , penatonic etc. Publishers aren't even interested in publishing I V relationship music, as new music, and that makes up all the masterworks. Everything is larger harmony extentions like Jazz also. But there is an exception to everything
    writing a film score you can get away with writing any style and get it pusblished yea... Anywayz for your easy harmony progressions study Bach's Chorals it all started there.

  9. #9

    Re: post tips here

    That's the tip I needed.

  10. #10
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    Re: post tips here

    Quote Originally Posted by rageangel
    That's the tip I needed.
    you can do your studying right online too
    here's a great place to start
    http://www.dolmetsch.com/theoryintro.htm

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