• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Topic: Impulse Responses from the "Gold" Hall

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Impulse Responses from the "Gold" Hall

    I'm wondering if there are any IR's of the hall where EWQLSO Gold was recorded available. Are they included?

    What kind of success are folks having blending this library with other samples that were recorded dry? What types reverbs are best for this purpose?

    Looper

  2. #2
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    5,755

    Re: Impulse Responses from the "Gold" Hall

    I can't give you any specific examples, but in general, the wet/dry issue is going to be secondary to the microphone plot and distances from the source instruments.

    In other words, you're going to have more trouble blending a sound mic'ed at 5 feet with a sound mic'ed at 15 feet than you will have blending sounds which are more wet or dry than one another. It's relatively easy to use reverb or convolution to add some closely matched wetness. It is more difficult to adjust the sonic imprint of mic position, as this very radically affects the imaging width of the signal. On the most general level, one must use channel blending and EQ to match the nearer-mic'ed signal to the farther. The closest mic is always the one which you'll need to manipulate, i.e., you can make a close mic'ed signal sound more distant a whole lot easier than you can make a distant mic'ed signal sound closer.

  3. #3

    Re: Impulse Responses from the "Gold" Hall

    Thanks Bruce. I'm hoping a little hi-end roll-off will put the closed miked instruments a bit further back in the room. I've had some success making a closed miked solo piano sound like it was further away by rolling off the highs and adding reverb. I agree mixing close-mic and distant-mic instruments will be trickier.

    There must be a lot of EWQLSO users doing this (mixing libraries). Does anybody know of an IR that blends with the recorded ambience? I'm surprised that EW wouldn't include a matching IR (if in fact they haven't).

  4. #4

    Lightbulb Re: Impulse Responses from the "Gold" Hall

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce A. Richardson
    The closest mic is always the one which you'll need to manipulate, i.e., you can make a close mic'ed signal sound more distant a whole lot easier than you can make a distant mic'ed signal sound closer.
    Great point, Bruce. That's why close-mic samples are always preferable, IMNSHO. You can always add reverb to a sample, but you never take it away.

    Impulse library development will be "the next big thing" - with big companies like Sony (formerly Sonic Foundry) and small groups like Spirit Canyon Audio producing a vast array of sampled spaces - both real and imagined. Alexy Vaneev is developing a surround version of his impulse modeler program, which promises some amazing flexibility. Garritan has mentioned that he's working on something related to impulses, and would be awesome to see more coming on that front.

    On a technical note, you might want to toy not only with high end roll-off, but also the pre-delay and decay time of an impulse to change the relative position of a sample front-to-back. Of course, pan position should be controlled in the instrument itself, because you can wreak havoc when you muck with the image of stereo impulse. The effect is almost always interesting, but almost never realistic.
    Houston Haynes - Titan Line Music

  5. #5

    Re: Impulse Responses from the "Gold" Hall

    Quote Originally Posted by Looper
    I'm wondering if there are any IR's of the hall where EWQLSO Gold was recorded available. Are they included?

    What kind of success are folks having blending this library with other samples that were recorded dry? What types reverbs are best for this purpose?

    Looper
    IR-1's Lex 480L concert hall works really nicely for blending dry samples with Gold. I'm not a big fan of Gold's oboe or cor anglais so I often use a custom library (recorded dry), VSL and the Vitous instruments here. Tweaking just as Houston suggests helps meld them and in practical terms there's really not a noticeable difference. In fact, I tend to find there's not many libraries that wont work with others after some tweaking. I'm not sure there's a "best" when it comes to wet vs dry - except when it comes to nappies (diapers) as my 10 month old is just about to demonstrate
    Trev Parks

  6. #6
    Senior Member Robert Kooijman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Karlskrona, Sweden
    Posts
    233

    Re: Impulse Responses from the "Gold" Hall

    To mimic distance, some high end roll off is indeed a good idea.

    Standard shelving EQ's give you some 6dB/oct. This is rather drastic for this purpose: it forces you to either limit the roll-off or set a relatively high crossover frequency.

    Tip: try a 3dB/oct curve instead.

    Haven't found a VST plugin that does this yet. I'm using a relatively simple passsive analog RC circuit similar to what you find in real time spectrum analysers for turning white into pink noise. It really helps in various close-miked scenario's.

  7. #7

    Re: Impulse Responses from the "Gold" Hall

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Kooijman
    To mimic distance, some high end roll off is indeed a good idea.

    Standard shelving EQ's give you some 6dB/oct. This is rather drastic for this purpose: it forces you to either limit the roll-off or set a relatively high crossover frequency.
    Voxengo Pristine Space allows for non-destructive tailoring of the impulse through an envelope-controlled low-pass filter (and they also have the same for volume, stereo width, pan, hi-pass, etc) which can be very effective for "dampening" the play-out of the impulse without coloring it completely. This somewhat mitigates the concern of a 6/dB per octave filter killing off too many of the early reflections by simply leaving the impulse fully open during that segment - with pre-delay, volume, and color of the dry/direct signal setting much of the positional information early on.

    I haven't been bold enough to mess with the stereo width controls, but in true stereo mode (stereo impulse on each channel) that can also be a great help in changing the perception of depth for a sound - although that can very quickly "monkey" with key signature aspects of the room and become a distraction to the listener.
    Houston Haynes - Titan Line Music

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •