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Topic: DFD vs. RAM vs. Freeze

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  1. #1

    DFD vs. RAM vs. Freeze

    With the myriad of RAM-saving technology, how does all of this work together? If, for example, someone is using GPO with Sonar 4 or Cubase. Do you even need DFD if you are freezing tracks? How does it all work?

  2. #2

    Re: DFD vs. RAM vs. Freeze

    "Freezing" is basically an automated way of converting a soft-synth or sampler track into an audio track. You could do it by hand in Sonar 2 and 3, but Cubase and Sonar 4 make it a whole lot easier to do, and thus make it more likely that you'll do it. For soft-synth tracks, this can mean a big savings of CPU. For sampler tracks, it can mean a big savings of memory. But of course, if you want to change anything, either in the MIDI track input or the patch settings, you need to un-freeze things, throw away the temporary audio track, and once you're happy with the changes, freeze it again.

  3. #3

    Re: DFD vs. RAM vs. Freeze

    If you have enough RAM in your DAW, loading GPO in RAM is the way to go imo. I really never trusted NI's DFD feature. I had read reports that using DFD adds more CPU overhead. Freeze is a different story. I'm not a Sonar user so I dunno. But in Nuendo 2, Freeze simply bounces down the midi track temporarily to audio and disables the VSTi to save CPU resources. In NU2 or SX2, the freeze function can take way too long to render especially if you have a very long project. Freeze render times depends on what you set in your project settings when you first make a new project. I have no idea if this feature was improved in SX3 or in the upcoming NU3. But the time it takes you to freeze/unfreeze the track is just not worth it if you have sufficient RAM to load and run GPO. My 2 cents...

  4. #4

    Re: DFD vs. RAM vs. Freeze

    Quote Originally Posted by Danielle
    I need the "for dummies" version of an explenation.
    Ok - I give it a try:
    In your sequencer, you have two kind of tracks:Midi Tracks and Audio Tracks. Midi Tracks contain the informations to drive GPO - loading your samples and playing back in real time. On audio tracks you can put wave and other audio files.
    So lets say you have a small computer and want to use the Piano in your composition. Since the piano uses a lot of computer power you want to "freeze" it and free the memory to load new samples.
    What happens:
    Your sequencer renders the whole piano track to disk and loads the result in a audio track, wich needs much less ressources from your computer. Now he can kick out the piano and make space for the new instruments. Since this track is an audio file (frozen), you can not alter it unless you "unfreeze" first.

    Does this make sense?

  5. #5

    Re: DFD vs. RAM vs. Freeze

    Actually, in Nuendo 2 (and probably Cubase) it's much easier to just export to audio, which adds a new audio version of the midi track. It's quick and easy. I've found Freeze to be something of a pain in the butt. Or maybe I'm not using it properly.....

  6. #6

    Re: DFD vs. RAM vs. Freeze

    Quote Originally Posted by robgb
    Actually, in Nuendo 2 (and probably Cubase) it's much easier to just export to audio, which adds a new audio version of the midi track. It's quick and easy. I've found Freeze to be something of a pain in the butt. Or maybe I'm not using it properly.....
    Same here. I'd rather export to new track than use the freeze function. Been doing it since v1.5 and gotten used to it that by the time v2 came out, the freeze feature was nothing special for me.

  7. #7

    Re: DFD vs. RAM vs. Freeze

    Quote Originally Posted by Danielle
    Thanks all. Though im not sure what the difference between this and simply recording a piano part seperate to audio, unloading, and re-loading/editing/recording when you need to make changes. Maybe just a faster method? Thanks for the responses
    That's basically exactly what the freeze function in sonar 4 is. Except instead of havign to do each of those steps seperately, you just choose freeze/unfreeze and it does it all for you.
    Tim

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