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Topic: Scoring advice needed...

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  1. #1

    Scoring advice needed...

    Hi folks.
    I have a question for those of you doing film scoring. I am working on my first one that is finally loaded into the mac as a QT file. Is it best when doing different cues to start new projects for each cue or to try to make the score complete to the entire film? I am thinking it is the former. Even though this one is ony a 10 minute short the director is calling for some minor tempo changes and that messes up everything else further down the line.
    What is the proper way?
    Thanks
    Chris

  2. #2

    Re: Scoring advice needed...

    Chris -

    definitely break it up. Even if you keep the same full, 10 min video for each file, at least have the cues separate. For tempo reasons mainly, but your overall sanity as well. I tried to do this before, and it didn't work too great. Plus, if (when) there are change requests, you have one single file for the cue you're messing with, and it's not the 'master' one, where you could screw up some automation or something like that, and affect earlier/later tracks.

    Eric
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    Eric Doggett
    MoonDog Media
    www.moondogmedia.net

  3. #3

    Re: Scoring advice needed...

    I think it's easiest to have a seperate sequence for each cue (you can use the same video file for all). Something that may be helpful is to have an additional sequence with the whole film on it. You can bounce mixes of each cue and then import them into this master sequence of the whole film. Then you can see how cues work next to one another. Sometimes you won't see a problem until the end of a previous cue butts against the next and doesn't work. This method is great for previewing your work for a director as well, so you don't have to open the sequence for each cue and have him/her sit and wait for each to open - kind of kills the vibe.


    Jeff

  4. #4
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    Smile Re: Scoring advice needed...

    Do spoting carefully with the director.
    According to the spotting, do each cues separately thinking unity of the whole cues.

    By the way, having good video editing software certainly helps.
    Kentaro Sato (Ken-P)
    Composer/Conductor/Orchestrator
    www.wisemanproject.com

  5. #5

    Re: Scoring advice needed...

    Thank you all for the advice it is most appreciated! This will be even more helpful once the nect project hits in a couple of weeks (it is feature length). I happen to have Final Cut express so if I don't get the rough cut broken down I can do it myself.
    Chris

  6. #6

    Question Re: Scoring advice needed...

    This topic makes me ask a question I've been wondering for a few days, about syncing cues at the dubbing stage on feature films and larger productions.

    Composers used to deliver their final mixes on tape along with a SMPTE striped track, but with Quicktime video LTC SMPTE timecode is no longer applicable.
    So, how do you sync the individual cues within a reel to the picture at the dubbing stage?
    Do tou deliver in WAV?
    Say you deliver 4 stereo stems in WAV format (e.g. strings, brass, solo instruments and percussion).
    Do you deliver 4 long stereo-tracks per reel, with silence in between cues so that you can just line these stems up to picure, placing cues for that reel all at once (using the head and tail pops on the video for lining up if necessary)?
    Or do you deliver individual WAV-files for each cue and use a cue sheet specifying the exact starting and ending point of each cue?
    If this is the case, what is used for reference, the visual timecode in the window burn on the quicktime movie?

    Many questions :-)

    Grtz. Roy

  7. #7

    Re: Scoring advice needed...

    My films come on quicktime, with timecode burned in. So I simply give them wav files, and make the time code part of the name of the file. E.G. Music1 01_17_51_18.wav . They then just match up the file location.

    Eric
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    Eric Doggett
    MoonDog Media
    www.moondogmedia.net

  8. #8

    Re: Scoring advice needed...

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Doggett
    My films come on quicktime, with timecode burned in. So I simply give them wav files, and make the time code part of the name of the file. E.G. Music1 01_17_51_18.wav . They then just match up the file location.

    Eric
    I usually give a ProTools session of the stereo or 5.1 mix. In any case, the files will all be timestamped relative to each other so they whould slot in at the correct place.

    Daryl

  9. #9

    Re: Scoring advice needed...

    Quote Originally Posted by Mandarin Man
    This topic makes me ask a question I've been wondering for a few days, about syncing cues at the dubbing stage on feature films and larger productions.

    Composers used to deliver their final mixes on tape along with a SMPTE striped track, but with Quicktime video LTC SMPTE timecode is no longer applicable.
    So, how do you sync the individual cues within a reel to the picture at the dubbing stage?
    Do tou deliver in WAV?
    Say you deliver 4 stereo stems in WAV format (e.g. strings, brass, solo instruments and percussion).
    Do you deliver 4 long stereo-tracks per reel, with silence in between cues so that you can just line these stems up to picure, placing cues for that reel all at once (using the head and tail pops on the video for lining up if necessary)?
    Or do you deliver individual WAV-files for each cue and use a cue sheet specifying the exact starting and ending point of each cue?
    If this is the case, what is used for reference, the visual timecode in the window burn on the quicktime movie?

    Many questions :-)

    Grtz. Roy
    If you are going to deliver your soundtrack there are two standards:

    1 - Pro Tools. If you made your final sync in pro tools, just burn the session in a cd and deliver it to your client. Most post studios have pro tools and they will accept your work in this format.

    2 - If you are not working in Pro Tools, just save your session as OMF file. It will keep record of all timecode positions of the tracks you used. This is a very professional choice, once almost every video production software can deal with this format. If you are working with Pro Tools and wish to deliver in OMF, no problem, it will do the job either.


    Good Luck!
    Last edited by Guga Bernardo; 08-25-2004 at 11:50 AM. Reason: bad english

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