• Register
  • Help
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 30

Topic: Conducting MIDI

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Boise, Idaho, U.S.A.
    Posts
    240

    Conducting MIDI

    Ok, this is going to sound a bit weird but I am looking for a little MIDI program that will allow me to artificially conduct my scores. I write by hand because I do not have a MIDI controller, and just putting in random tempo changes doesn't really seem to work all that well. So if I could find a program like this (kinda like the "tap tempo" in SONAR but one that you could use WHILE the file is playing) it would probably give a more human quality to my stuff. Does anyone know of anything like this out there? Thanks,

    James W.G. Smith

    [It's times like this that I wish I had learned more computer programming in college]

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    www.wisemanproject.com
    Posts
    398

    Smile Re: Conducting MIDI

    Cubase can do that staff. Instead of swinging a batton, you play keyboard.
    Kentaro Sato (Ken-P)
    Composer/Conductor/Orchestrator
    www.wisemanproject.com

  3. #3

    Re: Conducting MIDI

    If you are using Sonar or Cakewalk Pro Audio , you can go to View - Tempo and draw freehand exactly all the tempo changes you want, it really works wonders.
    Theo Krueger - Composer

    www.TheoKrueger.com

    Kontakt 2 Scripts

  4. #4

    Re: Conducting MIDI

    I think that this would be a blind avenue for most people as it would depend on your ability to conduct, the computer's interpretation of your conducting and many other variables. I think that the tapping scenario sounds like a good compromise.

    Daryl

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Boise, Idaho, U.S.A.
    Posts
    240

    Re: Conducting MIDI

    Well, the reason that I asked about this is because some guy listened to my music and said that it sounded "forced" and "mechanical" because it was too perfect or something (tempo-wise). So I went back into SONAR and basically put on a continually changing tempo, so, for example, if the tempo was 90 I would shift it between 85 and 95, about 256 times per measure. I also hand draw tempo shifts, such as ritards.

    That helped a bit but I am wondering if there is something that would be a bit better than randomly shifting the tempo so that it's not so perfect. Does anyone else have this problem? Oh, and most of the time I also make sure that the instruments are not playing perfectly in sync, but again that is random. Is that a bad idea? I am just trying to steer clear of having stuff that sounds horribly fake.

    If only I could play a keyboard worth a damn. Thanks,

    James W.G. Smith

  6. #6
    Power Profile User lukpcn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    on the end of the bow...
    Posts
    1,326

    Lightbulb Re: Conducting MIDI

    Quote Originally Posted by James W.G. Smith
    Well, the reason that I asked about this is because some guy listened to my music and said that it sounded "forced" and "mechanical" because it was too perfect or something (tempo-wise). So I went back into SONAR and basically put on a continually changing tempo, so, for example, if the tempo was 90 I would shift it between 85 and 95, about 256 times per measure. I also hand draw tempo shifts, such as ritards.

    That helped a bit but I am wondering if there is something that would be a bit better than randomly shifting the tempo so that it's not so perfect. Does anyone else have this problem? Oh, and most of the time I also make sure that the instruments are not playing perfectly in sync, but again that is random. Is that a bad idea? I am just trying to steer clear of having stuff that sounds horribly fake.

    If only I could play a keyboard worth a damn. Thanks,

    James W.G. Smith
    I always play with the translation of midi parameters like velocity and note position +/- on the for example violins and viola parts so they have random offset in posiotion and velocity.... it helps. Maybe you can try that also ?

  7. #7

    Re: Conducting MIDI

    Quote Originally Posted by James W.G. Smith
    Well, the reason that I asked about this is because some guy listened to my music and said that it sounded "forced" and "mechanical" because it was too perfect or something (tempo-wise). So I went back into SONAR and basically put on a continually changing tempo, so, for example, if the tempo was 90 I would shift it between 85 and 95, about 256 times per measure. I also hand draw tempo shifts, such as ritards.

    That helped a bit but I am wondering if there is something that would be a bit better than randomly shifting the tempo so that it's not so perfect. Does anyone else have this problem? Oh, and most of the time I also make sure that the instruments are not playing perfectly in sync, but again that is random. Is that a bad idea? I am just trying to steer clear of having stuff that sounds horribly fake.

    If only I could play a keyboard worth a damn. Thanks,

    James W.G. Smith
    I cannot really play the keyboard very well, but I play it all in segments... so i'll play one bit, then record the next bit etc. Work out what you need to play, even if it is a couple of notes at a time, and perform it. I don't think you can make it sound "human" any better way.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Budleigh Salterton
    Posts
    1,477

    Re: Conducting MIDI

    Quote Originally Posted by James W.G. Smith
    If only I could play a keyboard worth a damn. Thanks,

    James W.G. Smith
    James W.G. of Boise, Idaho,

    This is interesting. Everyone, including myself, wishes they new more about computers and programing. Instead of worrying about all that, why not take keyboard lessons? Got to be a lot more fun than constantly looking at a computer screen. It doesn't take that long, and then you could do what James Mac( and myself actually) do, and play in each individual part in sections. Then you can mess around with editing, like tempo changes etc. if indeed it's necessary.

    bests

    PR

  9. #9

    Re: Conducting MIDI

    If you can play keyboard at least well enough to play a melody, do this. Play the melody or primary line or bass part, whatever part you can for each section, with as much feel as you can. Then go back and create a quarter note (or whatever works) click track that corresponds to your melody.

    In Logic, you can then use that click track to create a tempo map for your song. I would imagine other programs have a similar function. This will put your melody on the bars/beats grid and away you do. You can always go back and edit the tempo map a bit if you need to.

    Also, over-quantization can lead to a mechanical feel, even with a "human" tempo map. Make sure you use your ears, not your eyes, to get the parts down. For example, on the piano roll editor, my string parts are almost always a bit ahead of the beat to compensate for the attack of the sample. Some notes are way ahead, some are a bit behind. PLay your parts line by line a bit at a time until they feel good. If you do quantize, set the percentage to only 50-80 %.

    Hope this helps.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    312

    Re: Conducting MIDI

    Hey James, I am assuming you are on a PC and so Ken-P's suggestion of Cubase for this purpose is a good choice. Digital Performer (Mac only) allows you to "conduct" the performance as well either in real time or after recording (audio and/or midi) by depressing a controller (piano key, foot pedal, etc.) The results are outstanding.

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •