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Topic: WD Raptor a bad idea?

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  1. #1

    WD Raptor a bad idea?

    With Gigastudio 3.0 on the horizon I'm wondering if the WD Raptor HD's would be worth the money. Is there any information on what sort of performance boost a 10,000 RPM HD would give over a 7200 RPM HD? Also these things don't seem to live very long under heavy use. So in that respect would it also be wiser to go with the 7200 RPM HD's?

    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Thumbs up Re: WD Raptor a bad idea?

    Musica

    Dude - Raptors are fast and in Raid 0 they have good bursts/read speeds. I have a set in RIAD0, - only problem I ran out a space.(Aint good) I recommend two SATA drives 2xSeagate 250GB 8 mbcache drives 7200rpm for more space. If ya dont need the room get Raptors.
    Just my 2 cents.

    Back da cave

    Caveman

  3. #3

    Re: WD Raptor a bad idea?

    Well I realize size is an issue, but in my case I'm working on splitting up libraries between three different computers. So for now HD size isn't a huge factor for me. And when the time comes that I'm reaching the performance limit of my HD's I can always just install another Raptor per computer.

    So the impression I'm getting is I should go with the Raptors then. Anyone have any rough estimates as to the performance increase I'd see between a Raptor and a 7200 RPM drive?

    Thanks

  4. #4

    Re: WD Raptor a bad idea?

    Sorry if this is a stupid questions, but what exactly is RAID?

  5. #5

    Re: WD Raptor a bad idea?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Blaske
    Well, either a 7200 RPM drive or Raptor is adequate for the current GigaStudio. Someone from Tascam would be the only person who could answer for GS 3.0 performance since it's not out yet. This is going to be a hard thing to benchmark for real world applications. There are an enormous number of variables.

    Tascam seems to suggest that RAID is the way to go for GS 3, so the two new computers I just built have two 250 GB WD 8 MB cache drives in a RAID 0 configuration for samples.

    I don't think it's practical to totally segregate certain sounds on specific machines without a lot of overlap. You'd lose a lot of flexibility that way.

    Lee Blaske
    Hi Lee,
    I currently have 1 Raptor 74gb(samples) and a 80 GB WD(Sata) for system and another 80GB WD(Sata) for backup (Ghost) I have a P4C800-E deluxe motherboard.
    If I get a 2nd Raptor, do you agree that I configure them both on the ICH5 Sata port in Raid 0 configuration, and my system drive and backup on the 2 Promise Serial ATA ports. If so, where should the DVD-R go? (Pioneer 107D)...on the ICH5R DMA or the Promise DMA?

    thanks Lee
    Mal

  6. #6

    Re: WD Raptor a bad idea?

    Quote Originally Posted by unison
    Sorry if this is a stupid questions, but what exactly is RAID?
    There aren´t stupid questions, there are only stupid answers

    RAID means Redundant Array of Independent Disks. What is it for?
    Think RAID as the inverse of partitioning a drive. When you partition a drive, you create many logical units into one phisical hard disk.
    When you use a RAID, you can make two or more hard drives behave as one logical unit. And why would you do that?

    1 - For performance reasons. You can spread your data over two ore more units, making data output faster. If you save a 2Gb file in your c:\ partition, RAID chops data in several pieces and saves them in separate physical drives. Since there is no mirroring in this mode, a failure in one of the physical units will result in data loss. This is called RAID-0.

    2 - For security purposes. You can make one hard drive behave as a mirror to the other one. If you save data in one hard drive, a copy is made on the other. If one drive fails, you still have all data in the other! This is called RAID-1.

    There is also RAID-2,3,4 and 5.

    RAID-2 is used for drives that do not have built-in error detection. Almost useless today.

    RAID-3 is very good, and it is ideal for single users that access long sequencial records all the time, like musicians! But it requires special hardware to work correctly, synchronized drives in order to avoid performance loss when recording small amounts of data.

    RAID-4 is like RAID-5 but it does not support multiple simultaneous write operations.

    RAID-5 is the best choice for multi-user environments. But is requires at least 3 drives to work.

    I hope this expanation helps.

    Cya around!

  7. #7

    Re: WD Raptor a bad idea?

    Thanks Guga for clearing that up.
    So is this RAID mode a mere question of jumper settings or/and does the motherboard need to support it..

    Actually it's wierd how slow developement on HD speed has been the last 3-4 years.. if you compare to CPU or CD-R speed developement.

  8. #8

    Talking Re: WD Raptor a bad idea?

    Guess what... I´ve been searching on google for updated information about RAID and I just found out that there are RAID levels 6, 10, 50 and one thing called "0+1".

    I think it is never going to stop!

  9. #9

    Re: WD Raptor a bad idea?

    Quote Originally Posted by Guga Bernardo
    There aren´t stupid questions, there are only stupid answers

    2 - For security purposes. You can make one hard drive behave as a mirror to the other one. If you save data in one hard drive, a copy is made on the other. If one drive fails, you still have all data in the other! This is called RAID-1.

    !
    So does this mean if one has two identical drives in Raid 1 configuration, there would be no need to use programs like Ghost to do backups?

  10. #10

    Thumbs up Re: WD Raptor a bad idea?

    Quote Originally Posted by mal7
    So does this mean if one has two identical drives in Raid 1 configuration, there would be no need to use programs like Ghost to do backups?
    Well, I think that's true!

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