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    An Interview with DANNY LUX

    <div align=\"center\">


    <font size=\"4\">Gary Garritan presents the Eighth in a series of GOS &quot;Meet the Artist&quot; Interviews featuring: </font>

    <font size=\"6\">DANNY LUX</font>

    </div>



    <font size=\"3\">

    It is an honor to have one of Northern Sound\'s most famous composers as our guest. Danny Lux has been with Northern Sounds from the beginning.

    Danny is an Emmy Nominated Composer whose music can be heard on many prime time television shows and in the movies. He has composed for the hit series \'Ally McBeal\' as well as \'John Doe\', \'Boston Public\'. \'Hack\', and \'Party of Five\'. Danny also scored for the film \"Halloween Resurrection\". Other credits include: \'Profiler\', \'Sabrina the Teenage Witch\', and \'Dawson\'s Creek\'. Danny is also a sample developer and created \"Harmonica Essentials: Blues Licks.\" </font>


    Below are questions submitted by members of the Northern Sounds forum and Danny\'s responses.


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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: KingIdiot

    Hey Danny, thanks for the time. How did you get your start in the biz? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    My start in television really happened by accident. I was 18 and out of high school for about 6 weeks when Mike Post\'s assistant Charlie Sydnor was looking for a music store. Charlie walked into the wrong building that was across the street. This was the building my father had a print shop, and after Charlie told my father what he was looking for, my father than sang my praises about how I was a musician, etc..and didn\'t let Charlie leave until he gave him Mike Post\'s office number, and said to call to inquire about a job.

    To make a long story short....I called, had an interview, and was hired to be Charlie\'s assistant at the scoring sessions. This was back in 1987, and Mike Post was still doing 2 to 3 scoring sessions a week. On many of Mike\'s shows, he would divide the music between about 5 or 6 composers. Mike owned 3 keyboard stations, and an electronic drum setup. My job was to help Charlie transport and setup this equipment, and remain at the sessions to troubleshoot problems, etc... throughout the sessions. I was paid $40 a session to do this. Not very much obviously, but it was really an amazing experience to go from playing in bands with friends, to being at amazing scoring stages and watching some of the best musicians around. The whole scoring session was a very unstressed social environment. At these sessions I became somewhat friendly with Mike Post which turned into being hired as his runner/assistant the following summer. Mike had a small project studio at his office. One thing lead to another, and after being there a year, I became Mike\'s engineer at his studio. The engineer is really also the producer/arranger for Mike\'s score\'s that were done at his studio. At first there was not a lot of shows being done there, but within 2 years, I believe about 90% of his work was done there.

    I could go on and on about my experiences over there, but I will just say that it was an incredible environment to learn about the TV music industry. Mike is very eager to give people opportunities to write, and I started out writing source music for him. Source music is music you hear when there is a scene in a bar, etc... and the music you are hearing if it is not recognizable is usually the composers responsibility. Eventually that lead to writing score, and the first show Mike had me write the whole score to was Silk Stalkings. At that point I think I was there for 3 years. I worked for Mike 9 years, and every year he would give me more shows to do. In my last year there, I think I wrote 3 or 4 of his series, and alternated episodes of NYPD Blue with him.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Scott Cairns

    Hi Danny, I was reading in another interview you did that you started as a drummer in a rock and roll band (so did I!). I was wondering, in what ways do you think that might\'ve helped your music? Or has it been a hindrance in any way? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    It probably initially helped me. Mike Post really did not have anyone at his studio working for him that was very proficient in the whole drum/ percussion area. Right away I was very involved in his projects playing and programming much of the percussion and drums for him. I would like to think in my own music, that I am still able to come up with interesting parts, so I can not really think of anything that has been a negative in regards to being a drummer.
    <font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    Also, do you have any classical training? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    I do not have any classical or legit training. I wish I had more training. Orchestrally speaking, my capabilities have been learned from listening and figuring out what how certain sounds are orchestrated. I feel I can write a fairly wide range of styles, but if I had to do a big John Williams sounding score, I would definitely use orchestraters to enhance. Thanks, Scott.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Maarten Spruijt

    Hey Danny, first let me say I admire you for the way you effectively write great underscores for ALL those series. What is your general method of writing? Do you write mostly on instinct? To what extend do you have a clear set of writing tools, templates, sounds and boundaries for every series, or episode? Thanks </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    I definitely write on instinct. I always try to get a feeling of tempo and mood first. The picture is definitely the road map. I try on every series to establish some sort of general pallet and vibe that is specific to that series. The templates can change depending on the specific story of a particular episode, but there is always a core template that gets utilized to some degree, especially when dealing with the main characters of a particular show. If I am going to go a different direction than I normally would, I would discuss this at the spotting session ( the meeting where I watch the show with the producer(s) ).

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: KingIdiot

    How the heck do you do so much work? It seems that everytime I watch a show you\'re name is attached somewhere </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    I would say while I was working for Mike Post, that speed was the most important factor to survive working for him, and that pace is how I continue to work. I have always felt the pressure to move fast, because fortunately there is usually enough projects heading towards me that I have to get the current one done quickly. I am always looking ahead about 7-10 days to try and figure out how much time I can put into each episode, and try not falter on the limits I put on myself.

    I mentioned the spotting sessions in the previous post. Normally composers have to drive to the particular studio where the producers are, and spot the shows at their offices. I would say on about 3/4 of the work I do, I have setup a system that we call \"telespotting\". On Ally McBeal, the drive to Manhattan Beach Studios is about 50 miles in traffic from my studio. I wanted to try to do some video conferences, but 6-7 years ago that was not reality. Then I wanted to setup ISDN lines to send smpte timecode from their location to mine, but I soon found that to be nightmare to get the lines going through the various studio red tape. My last effort was to purchase a Getner box which is essentially audio inputs and outputs to hook up to any phone. After A LOT of experimentation, I was able to find the magic combination of equipment that enables me to lock to timecode via a simple phone call. The producers on various shows messenger the video, I then digitize the video, they call me from there end and play a video that has the audio timecode being sent to me through their Gentner to mine. From that timecode phone call I am able to lock my picture to theirs in under 1 second when they hit play. A second phone line is used to talk to them as we look at the picture together. I think I have spotted about 200 episodes of tv episodes this way, saving me about a 3 hour round trip in the car each time.

    Unfortunately this can\'t be done on every show. The show has to be done being edited. John Doe this year never locked the episode in time, so I would spot off their AVID while they were still making changes.

    Part 2 of the answer is in the next question below from Phattlippz

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Phattlippz

    Hi Danny. My question is: in what ways do you save time in the composing process in order to get alot of music done in a short amount of time? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">
    </font>
    Danny:

    Definitely having big templates always loaded and ready to go for every cue whether I use all the sounds or not. For instance my templates in my sequencer usually have about 300 tracks assigned to various sounds ready to go. If a cue is going to have real woodwinds, etc..., I will pre-mix the cue minus the overdubs, and I have my assistant Matt Mariano record and run the overdub sessions in the other studio. My studio has 2 control rooms with a shared tracking room in the middle, so Matt can do the overdubs in the other room, and I can move on to another show while that takes place. Just having Matt do the sessions can probably save almost 2 full days a week for me.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Mike Harper

    hi danny: can you discuss your workflow a bit and site some typical examples. </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    My work flow basically starts with looking at a particular scene and deciding the tempo and mood. Every show or scene might have a different approach in terms of what kind of sound I might start with, but I will site an example from Ally McBeal which is vastly different from how I would approach a John Doe cue. On Ally I would typically start with a piano or acoustic guitar for the dramatic or play ons/ transitional cues. If it was a goofy comedy cue I might start with some pizz strings. But for an example on a playon (opening cue from a commercial), I might write the cues piano part first, next would be the drums that I trigger from a pad set, next I would record 2 Acoustic guitars, Bass, add more percussion, and perhaps some organ from the B4. After that I would mix it right away. Even though the cue might be short, it still takes a while to stack the real guitars and bass along with everything else. Something from John Doe would be a totally different approach.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Joanne Babunovic

    Hi Danny, ... When composing from scratch, some first start with drum track for defining basic concept, then add melody/chords, then add the arrangement fill. Some start with melody, then add arrangement fill, then add drum/rythym. Either of those describe your composing style? Or maybe you compose with a style different all together? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    I think I cited a good example in the previous question, however it totally depends on the type of music I am writing. If I am writing some sort of techno/action cue, I will probably try to build the rhythm or some cool synth riff first. If it\'s orchestral action, I might start with more of a marc string sound and put rhythm in last. I don\'t think I have any set order for every situation, it\'s more about what inspires me at the moment that is working to get the ideas flowing.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Didier Rachou

    Greetings Danny! Thanks for taking the time to do this and thank you Gary for making it happen. I enjoyed your score to Halloween Resurrection. I imagine you used a hybrid approach and the results were fantastic/ staggering. In today\'s climate of lower budgets, but higher expectations, this is a necessary survival trait. Could you elaborate a bit on your use of prerecorded orchestral structures and the way you weave them, sound design elements and of couse, live musicians into the tapestry of your compositions. Best regards, Didier </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    Glad you liked the score, I really had a lot of fun doing it. The approach to this score was a little backwards to how I would of wanted to do it. When I was hired, I was told that I might get some real musicians, but should proceed as if I were not going to get any. I tried to get them to commit to musicians but they would not. This completely alters the writing process. Instead of being free to write knowing I could do lots of creative orchestral effects, etc..., I had to write the score around the capabilities of my samples. In the end, I would have been fairly happy with just the samples, but I did add about 28 players at the end. I had a fair amount of custom violin and cello fx that I used alot. These effects are laid out, so one effect transposes over about 3 octaves giving a much more effect and bizarre texture. I used a lot of that throughout. I used probably most of the string effects in GOS and a few other libraries. I will try to give Gary an example to post. There are a lot of other effect type sounds, i.e, prepared pianos, Distorted Reality type effects, and so on.

    As for the real players, because I thought I might not get any, I took the approach that the real players would double a lot of the strings and brass, but the woodwinds would be a whole new texture added. I only had a few days from the time I knew I could use player until I recorded them, so I hired 3 orchestrators and let them be fairly creative on the woodwind writing as long as it was textural. We would also go over all the specifics for certain string and brass effects. In the end I think it sounds realistic and like a big size group.

    As for expectations from the producers, I think all producers think you can deliver the moon on any budget. As sample libraries get better and better, the expectations become huge.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: brewick

    Hi Danny, Just wondering how you tackle writer\'s block (if you get it!) when youv\'e got deadlines to meet. The reason I ask is because I\'m stuck in a musical rut at the moment, so any suggestions would be much appreciated! Thanks, Doug. </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    I don\'t really have any suggestions. I think I sort of get writer\'s block to some degree. I don\'t have a choice but to keep moving forward. I always have to write music that works for the picture regardless, although some days everything I seem to write does not really excite me, while other days it just seems to come out better for one reason or another. Who knows???

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Doyle W. Donehoo

    Hey, someone who looks like me! On one of my better days anyway. Anyway, I am always interested in studio setup, what libs are being used, and most important, what the workflow is on a given project. </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    I buy most of the major libraries, and use bits and pieces of all of them. Strange enough, I find that I tend to change occasionally. One day I might favor one main violin legato patch, and then I will right another cue where it sounds a little thin and switch to something different. It is also nice when you start a project to re-examine libraries for specific projects. I did a movie called Stolen Summer about a year ago where I had not used Gary\'s library much on the TV stuff, but I made an effort to use his library more, especially on the faster moving more whimsical cues, and the results were excellent. I did overdub some real players, but the samples were blended and it sounded great. Right now the TV season is on a break, and I am redoing all my computers and going through the libraries again. I really like the updated Hollywood KI strings. I like VSL a lot, and there are certain patches on Sonic Implants I like. I think we all owe Gary a tremendous amount for completely raising the bar on orchestral libraries. I can\'t wait to see what\'s next.

    As for my setup....(which is constantly changing)...............
    I have to Mackie D8b\'s linked - 4 Gigastudios - Run all PC\'s running Cubase SX system linked to 2 other machines - Mackie Control - run lots of soft synths ( Kontact, Halion, FM7, D\'Cota, Z3TA+, Absynth, B4, Reaktor, Delta III, etc....)- S-80 Controller - JV-1080 w/ world and FX Card, Emu XL-1, Access Virus C, Korg Triton, Waldorf Micro Q, TC M-3000, TC M-One, Avalon 737, Aphex 1100, etc.... That\'s the bulk of it.
    For the most part, I am in love with running mostly software, and debating going mixerless, or down to 1 D8b mainly for monitoring and bussing.
    As for the work flow I gave an example in Mike Harper\'s post earlier.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Franky

    Hi danny, This must\'ve been asked you dozens of times, and probably answered in some Magazine interview or what not but if you don\'t mind me asking, what\'s your typical setup for T.V. scoring, composing, (when you\'re not working with a real orchestra obviously)What bread and butter hardware, computer,software, samplers, Controller keyboard, sound modules effects etc etc do you have for your main work setup, Do you work out of your home studio alot or do you mainly work out of a big studio. What kind and brand of studio monitors do you prefer and why. I also enjoy your work, it\'s great to see the talent hanging around Northern Sounds, keep up the good work. Kindly, Franky
    </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    The basic equipment setup is mentioned in the previous post.
    I do work out of my home studio. A few years ago I built a house with separate studio. The studio is about 1300-1400 sq feet. It has 2 control rooms with a shared tracking room in the middle. The tracking room can hold about 15 players, and the control room B doubles as a booth that can hold about 5 more players. If I need to do more than that, I will break up sessions into Strings then Woodwinds and Brass together.
    Right now I am using JBL LSR 28Ps with the 12P sub woofer for my mains. The speakers I sit in front of and use more often are: LSR 25 Ps with a Tannoy subwoofer. Speakers are very subjective, and I have switched many times, but I do like my current setup. Regardless of the speakers, almost all mixes are checked on the crappy speakers on the TV monitor, they do wonders for setting correct balances.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Chadwick

    How much of a part do budget and time constraints play in deciding which parts will be played by synths, and which parts by players? taa Rick Chadwick </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    Budget almost completely dictates if I will use real players or not, but sometimes no matter what the budget is, I find that I have to bring in a particular player or 2 to keep it sounding good. I rather make less money than something sound awful.
    On John Doe, I wanted to use more players, but the schedule was ridiculous most of the time, giving me only 3 or 4 days to do 30+ minutes of music at times. There was one episode of John Doe that was quite different where I used something like 12 players on top of the strings as well as 4 woodwinds and 2 French horns.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Malo

    Hi, Danny! Let me start off by telling you that I love those clarinet/piano/acoustic guitar cues on Ally McBeal! Beautiful music that captures the various moods of the show perfectly. Keep up the good work! I would like to know how you handle the video aspect of your work: Are the episodes always delivered on VHS? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">
    </font>

    Danny:

    They are delivered on 1/2 inch VHS. Hopefully in the future they might come on DVD.
    <font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    How do you digitize them? (iMovie/FinalCut/Premiere, compression type, frame rate, key frame rate, data rate, image size, whole episode as one file?), and is this process very time consuming? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>

    The only MAC I use is my old G4 400 running ADOBE Premiere 5.1, Fuse Card, and Virtual VTR. I still use ORB 2 gig drives to back and forth to each room. JPEG compression from the FUSE card, 550k data rate, 16 bit 44k uncompressed, 320x240, and the whole episode is just under 2 gigs. It looks about AVID scratch quality at those settings which is fine for writing. <font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    Do you make Quicktime files (with your music added) so the producer can green light the cues? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Not yet, right now if they require a preview it is made mixed together on a VHS tape. I do anticipate doing some quicktime stuff delivered via my server which is hooked up to a T1 line. <font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    And then some audio questions: How do you record those beautiful clarinet cues on Ally McBeal? Do you remember the microphone, preamp, signal path...? They always sound really good! Do you record in your own studio or out-of-house? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">
    </font>
    In the beginning, I was working out my house out of 3 upstairs bedrooms. I initially think I had a Mackie 8 bus, replaced by 02rs. The pre amps were the 02rs and I used a Audio Technica 4050. Later on in the last year or 2 when I moved. I was using an Avalon 737 with a Rode NTK on guitar, and a Joe Meek VC1Q with the 4050 on Clarinet. <font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    What grand piano(s) is/are used on the McBeal cues? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">
    </font>

    Early on I was using the Coakley Steinway, but once I switched to Gigastudios I was using the Trachtman Steinway C for Ally. <font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    In what format do you deliver your music? (file types (aiff/sd2, stereo/mono), sub mixes?) Thank you for your time! </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">
    </font>

    I deliver all the mixes via the server on the T1 line. The mixes are any where from 1 to 4 stereo stems. I mix to Broadcast Wave files. Beleive it or not, most TV still want 16 bit not 24 bit mixes. I beleive that will change soon. Films definitely want 24 bit mixes. Music editors download the files direct and usually dump the stems into a protools session. No more mixing to a DA88!!!

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Joanne Babunovic

    Also, I would like to know your favorite piano sample/library. Thanks </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    I have a lot of pianos and like them all for different applications. I loved the Trachtman Steinway C for Ally McBeal, the Steinway B sounds good for songs, the Rain Piano is great sounding upright, my favorite for orchestral and delicate score is the Malmsjo. I love the distance on that piano. I am certainly no expert in this area, but I do think there are many great sounding pianos out there.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Thomas_J

    What orchestral library do you use the most? Do you have any private orchestral samples that you like to use? I know the L.A guys have some collections that are exchanged privately. </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    I mentioned earlier that I do have Gigastrings [Garritan Orchestral Strings], Sonic Implants, VSL [Vienna Symphony Library], etc.... I do have a handful of private samples, but a lot of them are gestures and fx type samples. I think towards the end of this season I was trying to lean on the VSL library. At the moment I am re-examining and have really been impressed by the Hollywood KI strings in Gigastrings. I think those will be my main pallet with a little bit of Sonic Implants in the violins. I am also interested in hearing some extensive EWQLSO demos. I hope you are one of the demo composers, but then again I think you could impress me with a sound canvas.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Alan Russell

    What do you consider the BEST Sax and Brass samplers in the Jazz genre? I enjoy scoring for Big Band. </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    I really am not the best person to ask this. For saxes, 99% of the time I will use real players. For Brass, I do like the VSL brass a lot. SAM horns are good. I don\'t have the Dan Dean stuff but the demos sound good. For me, I am mostly using VSL and am interested in the EWQLSO.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Haydn

    What is your typical work week schedule like when working on the average TV show? Does this schedule change depending on what show your doing? Thanks again for your time! </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    On average I have been balancing 3 or 4 series at once. Luckily, most weeks all 4 don\'t hit at the same time. Usually at least 1 show takes a week off while the others are going. But there are times when all happen at once. For me it\'s mostly about carving out blocks of time/day(s) for each show, and hope that some of them might not have a lot of music that week.

    A typical show might spot for instance on a Tuesday or Wednesday and mix the following Monday. Most shows that are running smooth will give at least 5-6 days. Some shows like John Doe couldn\'t get it together all season and would almost always give about 4 days. Even a show like Ally McBeal towards the end of the season would eat the post schedules up and start giving me about 2 or 3 days to turn it around. There have been plenty of times when I would only get 1 or 2 days, but typically you can hop for at least 5 days. Personally I count on at least 5 days from most shows so I can have some flexibility in juggling the work load.
    Does the schedule change??? Hourly in some cases. I usually can\'t count on my schedule being real if it is more than a week away on my calendar.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: MichaelAngelo450

    Hi Danny, appreciate you offering your time for this, thanks! In the modern world of film and television scoring, knowing what you know now, how would you have approached making a place for yourself in the industry differently? If there was something you could go back and maybe do a little differently, what would it be? (In your case, I think \"nothing\" could actually be a viable answer! But if there is something, what would it be? Thanks, mike </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    That\'s a tough question to ponder. I don\'t really know. Maybe at some point I will regret quitting certain shows? I hope not? I think I will have to look back in another 10 or 20 years. Right now I am pretty happy with my progression and don\'t have a lot of big complaints. It is also very hard to look back and say, \"what if I would of.....\" I would just be analyzing too much. I rather just focus on what\'s ahead.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Thomas_J

    Thanks for taking the time to answer some questions! I like your music very much! Have you been typecasted? If not, then how do you avoid it? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    Like wise on the compliment. I am sure most people that have some success get type casted by certain producers, etc.... I even think there are many producers out there that you can work for, and they will type cast you that you can not do anything outside of what you have done for their project. I think that arrogance is ridiculous, but it does happen. I think the best way to not be type casted is to have success or get some notice on different projects that sound completely different. Even film composers get type casted, \"he\'s the horror guy\", he\'s the light comedy guy\". I hear that stuff all the time. I found it much more interesting to do different projects requiring different sounds. At the beginning of Ally, I was also doing a similar sound on Party of Five. I did not want to, but that\'s the direction things went. I hope I don\'t have to do a guitar, piano, clarinet score for a long time. I believe good producers can listen to demos and make smart choices. Variety will hopefully keep the type casting to a minimum.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: JonFairhurst

    Hi Danny, I remember a quote - I think it was from the Jeff Rona book \"Reel to Reel\" - that went something like \"It\'s not what you can do, it\'s what you can do in a limited period of time\". Composing for television, I\'d imagine that you have more than a few \"limited period of time\" stories. Got any that really stand out? And do you have any suggestions for managing those types of situations, both emotionally and technically? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    I think this season was one of the uglier on schedules. As I pointed out, the last handful of John Doe\'s all had over 30 minutes, and were all 3 days to turn it around. I guess from an emotional mental level I try to wipe out big cues first to feel like the pressure is being lifted. Technically I hope nothing breaks!
    The time crunches happen all the time. The Stolen summer movie only gave me 2 weeks to do something like 35-40 minutes of music. A luxury in tv, but I had never worked with the director, so I had to preview in case of changes. Plus it was orchestral, so preparing for the sessions, recording,and mixing ate up about 4 or 5 days. Everyone has tight schedules, I just try to write music I like that the film makers will like.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Chadwick

    Hey Danny, Thanks for this. Could you describe your most difficult brief? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    I probably blocked it out....I tend to do that about miserable things. Thinking about this, there have been quite a few. I\'ll just say that in general, when you have a situation where the show runner(s) get in a room with anyone, i.e., lower producers, editors, assistant editors, etc... and ask the question \"what do you think???\" You are probably going to get put through hell. Music is absolutely subjective. What sounds great to one person can sound awful to another. You have to know the taste of the person(s) calling the shots, and if that suddenly becomes anyone walking by their door, be prepared for a lot of useless crap! I will just leave it at that, but rest assured there a lot of great people to work for, and just as many that are not.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: JonFairhurst

    I really like to hear the inside stories. Along those lines, have you had any, shall we way, interesting conversations with producers who just don\'t understand music? How about any jaw dropping requests from producers? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    I would say about half of the producers I have worked for are good at articulating what they are looking for. Some have been terrible. I have had comments in the past that a particular cue needed to sound more ironic. As far as I can tell, music plays moods and emotions. Ironic was one of the harder comments to interpret.

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    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Thomas_J

    What would be your best musical experience? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    I don\'t know if I can pin point it to one experience. I do think getting to record a decent amount of players is always a lot of fun. Anytime something comes out great, it really is a rewarding feeling. Although, I still think I had more fun playing gigs as a teenager in a band than any other musical experience.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Thomas_J

    Do you want to eventually score big budget hollywood blockbusters, or are you comfortable with the work you do for TV? Thanks and good luck with your career! Thomas </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    I think scoring a big budget blockbuster would be awesome! I am really comfortable doing the good tv gigs, and I think to get to the big movie level takes a huge lucky break, or a big committment to work you way up. Chris Beck is a perfect example. His TV career was going great, but he quit it all to focus on the film thing. In the end I think he will be doing many blockbusters, but for me, I am not ready to give up TV to try the same route. I am still very interested in films, but I rather just see where opportunities lead.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: KingIdiot

    What\'s been your favorite project/show to work on? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    I\'d have to say from a fun perspective, Ally McBeal was the most fun. The people were great to work with.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: KingIdiot
    Are there any projects you really would like to be doing? Specific Movies, TV shows, etc? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    From a music standpoint, I think I like doing the darker more suspenseful shows. I really enjoyed writing on John Doe and Profiler. The light hearted teen troubled shows don\'t allow you to write nearly as interesting music. I can\'t really say there\'s any specific project I wish I had, it\'s more about the style of the content.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: kid-surf


    What do you have that other\'s don\'t? More specifically, what do \"you\" like about your music? I mean you obviously have \"something\" happening musically that many others don\'t (hence your success)... what is \"it\" to you? What is your \"it\" factor? What makes you the \"hot guy\" around town in your eyes... other than being just another pretty face in Hollywood? No need to be modest! Thanks! Have a good one, Danny! </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    Very good question, but tough to answer about yourself. I\'ve always believed that to get and keep work, you have to give a score that services the picture well, be able to deliver quickly, be able to be very self sufficient technically, and know how to interpret the producers/directors. I think I do all of that well. As for specifics of what my stand out quality???? I think I can be a chameleon of many styles which allows me to have a shot and getting a wide variety of gigs. I think I can enhance a scene without fighting with dialogue and being noticed too much. I am just guessing though. This is a question for someone who actually hires me.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: Thomas_J

    What\'s your favorite instrument? Let me guess… CLARINET..? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">

    </font>
    Danny:

    I would have to say drums. That\'s the only instrument that I can actually play fairly well.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    <font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Member: KingIdiot

    How the heck did you become one of the first members here at NS? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">
    </font>
    Danny:

    I would assume I bought Gigasampler before most, and like everyone else, I was looking for some answers to some questions.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Thanks for all the questions and interests. I may not post a lot in the forums, but I read them all the time and am knocked out by a lot of the demos I have checked out from many of you. Good luck!

    Thanks again.

    Danny Lux

  2. #2

    Re: An Interview with DANNY LUX

    Hey Danny,

    Thanks for your time! I really enjoyed reading the interview.
    Thanks Gary for this series, great idea.

    Regards,
    Peter Roos

  3. #3

    Re: An Interview with DANNY LUX

    HA!

    Thanks Danny, great read, and it gives me a good feeling that you\'ve put the KI Strings in your normal Template. I\'ve converted two of you TV guys, and the truth is its you guys I made the patches for pretty much. I told Gary that \"This stuff is really for the TV guys\", so far both you and Rob Kral have popped them in your normal template. I understand how hard that is to let a sound to be part of your template, that you guys have already added them makes me feel like I did part of what I set out to do (besides ofcourse making them for myself, and other GOS users too [img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img] )

  4. #4

    Re: An Interview with DANNY LUX

    Danny,

    I got you beat by 91.

    - Chris (member #13)

  5. #5

    Re: An Interview with DANNY LUX

    hey jsut because you got a Time Machine....

  6. #6

    Re: An Interview with DANNY LUX

    I could only think of a question after I realized that Danny doesn\'t live in Los Angeles proper.

    How the heck do your musicians deal with driving all the way out to your studio for scoring?

    Are they late very often? Do they get extra money for the drive?

    Scoring days must be nerve wracking in that regard....especially when using a new person.

    How do you like living out there? I often wondered what it would be like moving out of town....(can you tell I\'m house hunting?)

  7. #7

    Re: An Interview with DANNY LUX

    Thank you Danny and Gary for the interview.

    King, congratulations! You\'ll be like Eric Persing now, sitting there watching TV saying; \"hey I made that patch!\"

    Scott.

  8. #8

    Re: An Interview with DANNY LUX

    Oh, and thanks to Northern Sounds too. These forums just blow me away. I can\'t believe how much I have learnt here... [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  9. #9

    Re: An Interview with DANNY LUX

    Thank you Danny!

    Lots of great questions answered there. Good luck with all your future projects.

    Chris

  10. #10

    Re: An Interview with DANNY LUX

    Thanks for the informative answers, Danny!

    I saw \"Stolen Summer\" on DVD last night. Great movie, wonderful music!

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