• Register
  • Help
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Topic: "Alaska" by Hummie Mann

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Orcas Island
    Posts
    11,454

    Arrow "Alaska" by Hummie Mann

    Here is an excerpt of "Alaska" composed by Hummie Mann. Ged Brockie performed the "GPO realization".

    http://www.garritan.com/mp3/HummieMann-Alaska.mp3

    All of the instrumentation for the piece was from Personal Orchestra.


    Hummie Mann is a two-time Emmy Award Winning Film and TV composer.Feature Film Credits include: Mel Brook's 'Robin Hood: Men in Tights', upcoming Capella Film’s “After the Rain”, Peter Yates' “Year of the Comet”, 'Dracula Dead and Loving It', 'Thomas and the Magic Railroad', 'Cyberworld 3D' (IMAX) and 'Falltime'. TV Credits include: 'P.T. Barnum' (mini-series), 'In Cold Blood' (mini-series), 'The Second Civil War' (HBO) and 'First Do No Harm' (CBS). Hummie co-produced the Marc Shaiman scores for such hits as “Sleepless in Seattle”, “A Few Good Men” and “Mr. Saturday Night”, and both orchestrated and conducted the Shaiman scores for “City Slickers” and “The Addams Family”. His orchestrations can also heard in such films as “Speechless”, “Addams FamilyValues”, “Misery”, “Sister Act”, “Dying Young”, and “For the Boys” and he co-arranged the song “Places That Belong to You“ for Barbra Streisand's “Prince of Tides” soundtrack album. One of Hummie's Emmy Awards was for arranging Billy Crystal's opening number for the “1992 Academy Awards”. In theatre, Hummie has also arranged material for Debbie Reynolds' tour of “The Unsinkable Molly Brown” and created new arrangements for Pia Zadora in “Funny Girl”, and has arranged music for various other stage productions including “Babes in Toyland”, “Kiss Me Kate”, “The Merry Widow” and Cloris Leachman's “Perfectly Frank”. Hummie is also a magna cum laude graduate of Berklee College of Music. Besides his busy composing career, he is also the principal instructor of the Pacific Northwest Film Scoring Program, a board member and founding president of the Seattle Composers Alliance and is a governor of the Northwest Chapter of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. You can visit Hummie's website at: http://www.hummiemann.com.


    Ged Brockie is a world-class acoustic guitarist and composer. He has recorded of three releases (two with SGQ - Scottish Guitar Quartet), with three new releases due out this year, Ged is also the driving force behind the Edinburgh International Summer Jazz School and Circular Records (http://www.circular-records.com/public/). Ged is a member of the Scottish Guitar Quartet comprising four of Scotland's leading acoustic guitarist-composers. Ged has worked at all levels of music education within Scotland from school to University level and will be teaching "Creating Orchestral Simulations using the Garritan Personal Orchestra" this Summer at the Pacific Northwest Film Scoring Program's European program in Edinburgh, Scotland (see http://www.pnwfilmmusic.com).

    Thanks Hummie and Ged!

    Gary Garritan



    [PS: Don't worry about the GPO Orchestration Competition - Hummie is disqualified from the Competition since he is one of the judges ]

  2. #2
    Very impressive. Should turn a few heads. Thank god they're disqualified is all I have to say. Of course, there are people on this board that more than compete with this (not said to offend.) I think it's about time for me to give it up.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph Burrell
    Very impressive. Should turn a few heads. Thank god they're disqualified is all I have to say. Of course, there are people on this board that more than compete with this (not said to offend.) I think it's about time for me to give it up.

    Dont give up! Contrary to popular belief writing is not something that happens overnight. Composers like Tchaikovsky were latecomers and the years show the maturity of his works. His later works are so drastically different then his early stuff. Not saying his early stuff was "bad" being that I find just about anything in music interesting. Not everyone is Mozart and writing masterpieces at ungodly young ages. You are your biggest critic. I looked thru my scrapbook of all my piano music over the years(that I now intend to re-write some for GPO)and admit that alot were more or less something im not proud of and sound more akin to just a piece of "showing off" technique or "excersises" then compositions.

    Sometimes taking breaks is really benificial. I found that not having to make a living writing or playing and concentrating my life on other things to be the most helpful. I was hesitant to post the unfinished excerpt being that I usually only played my works from the piano to a family member or friend. But, nonetheless dont give up. You never know.
    Nicole Davis

  4. #4
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    West Seneca, NY
    Posts
    11,075

    Thumbs up

    Well! What makes a professional a professional?
    Balance, knowing exactly how an instrument is used, its limitations, it's placement. If I didn't know better I would have absolutely thought this was a live orchestra. Notice how well placed the brass is? They sound comfortable not stressed out as if to carry the whole orchestra on their shoulders. The strings are so neatly involved as a unit of the whole. Wow, listen to that low brass the effect it has! Cool!
    This was a pleasure to listen to. Thanks Gary for posting.
    Let me listen again…

    I had to come back. Check the spatial placement of the instruments. As a percussionist, this had just the right amount of use in terms of spacing. None of the instruments sounded "stressed" or "stretched" to their limits. Wow, enjoyed this immensely. Then again, always enjoyed Hummie Mann's work.
    Gary, be nice if you could do an interactive interview with Mr. Mann.(?)
    Styxx

  5. #5
    Oh yes sorry I got caught up in the second post.

    That is very neat indeed and im glad it was shared with us. Helps to hear others using the same program and how they use the instruments. Goes without saying that the best way to learn more often then not is by example

    Now can we please have some noise, whispers, coughs, and a graphic on the player thing with some wild haired guy we can call Leapold swishing around the baton like a frenzied mad man!
    Nicole Davis

  6. #6
    Really nice stuff indeed. Lucky for those entering the competition he's one of the judges and not a participant.

    Thank's for sharing.

    Cheers

    Rodney

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Garritan
    [PS: Don't worry about the GPO Orchestration Competition - Hummie is disqualified from the Competition since he is one of the judges ]
    Now we know where to forward some of the bribes!

  8. #8
    Senior Member CString's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    152
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole
    Contrary to popular belief writing is not something that happens overnight. Composers like Tchaikovsky were latecomers and the years show the maturity of his works. His later works are so drastically different then his early stuff.
    Well put, Nicole. You can trace a path of maturity through most composer's works. Most early works are technically weaker in most cases which makes perfect sense. Not that I wouldn't have minded having technique downloaded directly into my noodle a la The Matrix.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole
    ]Not everyone is Mozart and writing masterpieces at ungodly young ages.
    Hehehe. Definitely a rare event. We toss the word genius around far too much.

    -Chad

  9. #9

    Re: "Alaska" by Hummie Mann

    Quote Originally Posted by Styxx
    Well! What makes a professional a professional?
    Balance, knowing exactly how an instrument is used, its limitations, it's placement. If I didn't know better I would have absolutely thought this was a live orchestra. Notice how well placed the brass is? They sound comfortable not stressed out as if to carry the whole orchestra on their shoulders. The strings are so neatly involved as a unit of the whole. Wow, listen to that low brass the effect it has! Cool!
    Interestingly enough..Hummie talks about this a lot in his course. A huge part of the true art of orchestration is understanding how to acheive the right balance of different timbres...WITHOUT touching a mixing board. With MIDI stuff, including with GPO..you can always bump up that flute part that is playing in too low of a register...or bring DOWN the level of a shreaking high flute part, etc. With real players..you don't have that luxury. Hummie wrote this piece for real orchestra...so naturally it should translate straight across to GPO with hardly any fiddling of levels between tracks and such.

    This is a testament, both to Hummie and GPO. Hummie for his tenured skills in orchestration, and GPO for taking a real score and fairly accurately representing it. I have an actual recording of the real version of "Alaska" performed by LA hot shot players; and this GPO version seems to represent the timbral balance quite well..

    A nicely orchestrated piece of music..just mixes itself.
    "Music is a manifestation of the human spirit similar to a language. If we do not want such things to remain dead treasures, we must do our utmost to make the greatest number of people understand their secrets" -- Zoltan Kodaly

  10. #10

    Re: "Alaska" by Hummie Mann

    ps - if Hummie is one of the judges..you can count on his vote leaning towards arrangements which will translate well to REAL orchestra. In other words, no matter how good it sounds with GPO..if he takes one look at the arrangement and realizes it will not sound right with the real orchestra...you'll probably not have his vote..

    That means, while working on your arrangement...try hard to leave all tracks mixed at unity "0" level and let the arrangement itself control the mix.
    "Music is a manifestation of the human spirit similar to a language. If we do not want such things to remain dead treasures, we must do our utmost to make the greatest number of people understand their secrets" -- Zoltan Kodaly

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •