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Topic: "midifying" your scores

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  1. #1

    \"midifying\" your scores

    Hi all,

    I was wandering how people usually approach the task of entering the parts in the sequencer.

    Do you enter each line without worrying about sequencer tempo? do you play with the click? Do you quantize what you play? Do you draw your notes on the piano roll-like window?

    If you play with the click, how do you overcome the problem of making natural tempo sweeps? Is this done manually after entering the score?

    I supose everyone will have its own technique, so I thought it would be an interesting discussion.

    Anton

  2. #2

    Re: \"midifying\" your scores

    [ QUOTE ]
    If you play with the click, how do you overcome the problem of making natural tempo sweeps? Is this done manually after entering the score?


    [/ QUOTE ]

    In a classical piece with small number of instruments, such as piano solo or flute and piano, I usually set tempo for each quarter note (or even eighth note) to create \"natural tempo sweeps\".

    Here is an example:

    http://homepage2.nifty.com/yamamoto_jun/LEGEND.MID

    Sincerely,

  3. #3

    Re: \"midifying\" your scores

    I prefer to enter everything to a fixed beat, then alter it afterwards for tempo changes. I might do it differently if the tempo changed greatly numerous times, but I think that\'s best if you\'re talking about gentle rubato type changes.

    Whatever you do, do not quantize 100% across the board. That\'s one way to quickly turn your beautiful GPO orchestra into an ugly synthesizer. I use some quantization, as I\'m not always the most accurate player. I just make sure I don\'t overdo it, and often add a slight random shift to each note during quantization (easy to do in most sequencers).

    It\'s a very simple equation:
    People do not play perfectly. Therefore, perfectly-played music does not sound like people.

  4. #4

    Re: \"midifying\" your scores

    Sure!

    There is so much difference when you play your parts. Then, suddenly, you have an orchestra made of lots of instruments, you can feel its size just because each instrument is doing its own way, and not playing chords in a block.

    Anton

  5. #5

    Re: \"midifying\" your scores

    I almost always do the initial rough draft to a fixed, inflexible beat, and then go back when it\'s done (or at least a large section of it) and modify the tempos accordingly so that I can get a sense of how the sound moves and flows. If I were to try to anticipate it before I really see how everything works together I\'d end up changing it all anyway so I figure why waste my time. Maybe others are better at the big picture while they\'re working than I am, but that\'s my system.

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